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point125

join:2012-08-06

1 edit

[Connectivity] "not servicable" despite trunk line and

So, a house I would like to move to is "unserviceable" despite the trunk line running past on the utility poles and the houses 3 doors down having service.

I have read a bit on the subject but most of what I see are people who don't have cables past their house already and wanting them to extend them to their house. Since the trunk line already runs past, I believe I am safely assuming that the problem is not being too far from a node.

The only, and obviously glaring, catch is that the house is setback 1000' from the state road that has the trunk line running. Is this a common limitation that makes a house "unserviceable"? I am trying to get a copy of the franchise agreement, but no luck so far (to see if I can require them to drop it down right by the street and do the wireless thing from there).

The phone reps are pretty useless on giving any kind of explanations, does anyone know who I need to be in touch with to get an accurate description of the reasons?

What are the limitations on running line 1k'? Would they have to run trunk line with amplifiers down my driveway? Or could that extra 1k feet magically put me too far from a node? I don't have a problem paying a few thousand to get service as I understand 1k' is a bit out of the norm.

IDK I am just really frustrated.


DrDrew
That others may surf
Premium
join:2009-01-28
SoCal
kudos:17

Re: [Connectivity] "not servicable" despite trunk line

said by point125:

What are the limitations on running line 1k'? Would they have to run trunk line with amplifiers down my driveway? Or could that extra 1k feet magically put me too far from a node? I don't have a problem paying a few thousand to get service as I understand 1k' is a bit out of the norm.

Standard drops go out to about 300', that's about the usual "serviceable" range from an existing cable tap. Beyond that you need hardline (trunk line). Once past 500-600' you'll need amplifiers and amplifiers need power. Power extensions usually require plant design and engineering involvement.

So yes, you'll need a trunk line with an amplifier. Make a visit to your local cable office and get information for the local construction manager, that's who you need to contact.
--
If it's important, back it up... twice. Even 99.999% availability isn't enough sometimes.

point125

join:2012-08-06
said by DrDrew:

Standard drops go out to about 300', that's about the usual "serviceable" range from an existing cable tap. Beyond that you need hardline (trunk line). Once past 500-600' you'll need amplifiers and amplifiers need power. Power extensions usually require plant design and engineering involvement.

So yes, you'll need a trunk line with an amplifier. Make a visit to your local cable office and get information for the local construction manager, that's who you need to contact.

Thanks a lot for the reply. Can "cable taps" be done at any point along a trunk line, or are they at specific points only (I.E. 3 doors down) Asking to see if that could be a limiting factor.

I assume that 500-600 range that need "plant design' (definition?) is where things get unbearably pricey for one person? Even 5k would be ok with me.


tshirt
Premium
join:2004-07-11
Snohomish, WA
kudos:5
Reviews:
·Comcast
If it's just one house, it will likely be in the 10K plus range (and that's not the whole cost, comcast would be covering quite a bit.
However if you check with the local "construction" office, thet will arrange to have it survyed AND give you an exact estimate for a plant extension.
good luck

BTW the non cash part of the cost is they will REQUIRE a permanent RoW easement, deeded if that is required in your state.


DrDrew
That others may surf
Premium
join:2009-01-28
SoCal
kudos:17
reply to point125
Yes cable taps are done at specific points.

Trunk lines are between the node and amplifiers or between 2 amplifiers . Feeder lines are from amps to taps. So if it's truly a "trunk" line, they won't tap it. The cable company will tap a feeder line though, if they signal is strong enough and it won't put customers further down the line out of acceptable signal levels.
--
If it's important, back it up... twice. Even 99.999% availability isn't enough sometimes.


gar187er
I do this for a living

join:2006-06-24
Dover, DE
kudos:4
reply to point125
trunk it called trunk for a reason....normally taps are not inline on trunk runs.....what they could do is cut a DC (directional coupler/fancy splitter), and mount an amp at that point; which as was said needs power. Then run feeder (smaller hardline) back to you, and put a tap within a hundred feet of your house.
--
I'm better than you!

point125

join:2012-08-06

1 edit
I thank you all for your replies, you are starting to move out of my vocabulary though so please forgive me for asking about things google does not provide definitions for.

said by tshirt:

If it's just one house, it will likely be in the 10K plus range (and that's not the whole cost, comcast would be covering quite a bit.
However if you check with the local "construction" office, thet will arrange to have it survyed AND give you an exact estimate for a plant extension.
good luck

BTW the non cash part of the cost is they will REQUIRE a permanent RoW easement, deeded if that is required in your state.

Well, I own the road frontage and the utilities already run to the house, so I don't think it's an issue of having a place to put it.

said by DrDrew:

Yes cable taps are done at specific points.

Trunk lines are between the node and amplifiers or between 2 amplifiers . Feeder lines are from amps to taps. So if it's truly a "trunk" line, they won't tap it. The cable company will tap a feeder line though, if they signal is strong enough and it won't put customers further down the line out of acceptable signal levels.

So trunk line is from node, going along with amplifiers, feeder lines only come off from where amplifiers are and terminate at taps which then run drops to homes?

So I might not be in range of a feeders tap and may have to pay to get one run from the closest amplifier just to have service at the end of my driveway (forgetting about the 1k foot driveway)? There looks to be an amplifier less than 100' down the road. If it is in fact an amplifier, there should be no problem with them running a line from it to the road frontage of the property correct?

Is that not something they normally take care of?

said by gar187er:

trunk it called trunk for a reason....normally taps are not inline on trunk runs.....what they could do is cut a DC (directional coupler/fancy splitter), and mount an amp at that point; which as was said needs power. Then run feeder (smaller hardline) back to you, and put a tap within a hundred feet of your house.

I may be using the terminology incorrectly. What I know is the large cable below the power cables with the loops and metal boxes (what I assume are amplifiers) in them run along the power lines, all down the road. And that 3 houses down it tees off toward a few houses, and a rep confirmed that was the closest serviced address.

Also, one of those metal boxes on the lines I assume are amplifiers are less then 100' from the road frontage.


flwpwr

@comcast.net
reply to point125
said by point125:

So, a house I would like to move to is "unserviceable" despite the trunk line running past on the utility poles and the houses 3 doors down having service.

I have read a bit on the subject but most of what I see are people who don't have cables past their house already and wanting them to extend them to their house. Since the trunk line already runs past, I believe I am safely assuming that the problem is not being too far from a node.

The only, and obviously glaring, catch is that the house is setback 1000' from the state road that has the trunk line running. Is this a common limitation that makes a house "unserviceable"? I am trying to get a copy of the franchise agreement, but no luck so far (to see if I can require them to drop it down right by the street and do the wireless thing from there).

The phone reps are pretty useless on giving any kind of explanations, does anyone know who I need to be in touch with to get an accurate description of the reasons?

What are the limitations on running line 1k'? Would they have to run trunk line with amplifiers down my driveway? Or could that extra 1k feet magically put me too far from a node? I don't have a problem paying a few thousand to get service as I understand 1k' is a bit out of the norm.

IDK I am just really frustrated.

250 foot from an existing tap to your power meter, if this is possible you are serviceable, 250 foot = RG11, 150 foot = RG6, more than that = you pay for plant extension/modification, period, and no they do not even have to offer you that.

point125

join:2012-08-06
said by flwpwr :

250 foot from an existing tap to your power meter, if this is possible you are serviceable, 250 foot = RG11, 150 foot = RG6, more than that = you pay for plant extension/modification, period, and no they do not even have to offer you that.

So would 250ft from an amplifier would qualify? Why do you say to the power meter?


gar187er
I do this for a living

join:2006-06-24
Dover, DE
kudos:4
reply to point125
an amp is less then 100' down the road? you know that between poles is about 150'...so there is an amp right out in front of your house?

if so then you would need only pay for the hardline to be run back to your house....but again, his isnt a normal install....construction department would be involved
--
I'm better than you!


trythisfirst

@comcast.net
reply to point125
The only problem is you cant be more than 250' from the trunk line. If you are you are considered unserviceable, the node has nothing to do with your problem. Best bet is ask to have a site survey done. They will then discuss how much, and who is on the hook for the amount. They may or may not be required to build out to you at no cost since you are that far away.

point125

join:2012-08-06
said by gar187er:

an amp is less then 100' down the road? you know that between poles is about 150'...so there is an amp right out in front of your house?

if so then you would need only pay for the hardline to be run back to your house....but again, his isnt a normal install....construction department would be involved

Yes, there's actually 3 poles right out in front of the driveway spaced much closer then normal for all the utilities to the houses (4 driveways come out right there), the amplifier is at the closest normally spaced pole no more then 200 feet away, I would say 100, but it's a bit of a guess.

said by trythisfirst :

The only problem is you cant be more than 250' from the trunk line. If you are you are considered unserviceable, the node has nothing to do with your problem. Best bet is ask to have a site survey done. They will then discuss how much, and who is on the hook for the amount. They may or may not be required to build out to you at no cost since you are that far away.

Why cant I request that they drop down to the front of my drive and I have the connection completed there like I assume a new house with that much of a setback would be constructed?


DrDrew
That others may surf
Premium
join:2009-01-28
SoCal
kudos:17
said by point125:

Why cant I request that they drop down to the front of my drive and I have the connection completed there like I assume a new house with that much of a setback would be constructed?

If they end the drop at the front of your driveway (1000' from your house), you won't have enough signal to do anything with once at your house.

To get the signal to your house, they need to do a cable plant extension so there will be a tap within 250' of your house.

A simple drop 250' or less = free or low cost install.

A plant extension to make a 250' drop (less is better) possible = pay for construction of cable plant.

Average construction costs for cable plant $5-10 per foot. Talk to the local cable construction manager to get a better estimate.
--
If it's important, back it up... twice. Even 99.999% availability isn't enough sometimes.

point125

join:2012-08-06
said by DrDrew:

If they end the drop at the front of your driveway (1000' from your house), you won't have enough signal to do anything with once at your house.

Well I was thinking about one of the work around I had read about like using a directional wireless, or maybe some sort of Ethernet run with extenders or some other jerry-rigged setup.

The biggest problem I'm having is the reps I've spoken to have said it's yes or no with no gray area, and it's no for me, and I've been haven't been able to get to anyone who would even consider having me pay for the connection.

But I will try calling the local office rather then the 1800 number tomorrow instead, and try to get to a construction manager.

Again, thank you very much for the help.


gar187er
I do this for a living

join:2006-06-24
Dover, DE
kudos:4
comcast wont go for it. talk to construction. and talk with your town/city council about your franchise agreement, as that dictates what comcast is entitled to do to get you service.
--
I'm better than you!


flwpwr

@comcast.net
reply to point125
said by point125:

said by flwpwr :

250 foot from an existing tap to your power meter, if this is possible you are serviceable, 250 foot = RG11, 150 foot = RG6, more than that = you pay for plant extension/modification, period, and no they do not even have to offer you that.

So would 250ft from an amplifier would qualify? Why do you say to the power meter?

Is an amplifier a tap? No.

point125

join:2012-08-06
What would the title of a company be that would be installing cabling? Like data infrastructure or something? The type of company you would call if you were doing new construction. Comcast doesn't seem to want to help at all so I think I would have better luck talking to a contractor who deals with this and is actually interested in business to run cable from my house to the street and then just have Comcast hook into a junction box.

ExoticFish

join:2008-08-31
Stuarts Draft, VA
You can call whom ever you want to install cable but the problem will be IF Comcast wants to use it and is even able to without plant modification. You need to be speaking with Comcast first before shelling out any $ for cable installation.
--
»www.VAJeeps.com

point125

join:2012-08-06
Like I said, they aren't interested in helping, aren't they legally required under most franchise agreements to make a connection so long as it's X number of feet from the public utility polls?

How does anyone build a house setback more than 100 feet from the road if the cable company can basically say F you any time they want.


DrDrew
That others may surf
Premium
join:2009-01-28
SoCal
kudos:17
said by point125:

Like I said, they aren't interested in helping, aren't they legally required under most franchise agreements to make a connection so long as it's X number of feet from the public utility polls?

How does anyone build a house setback more than 100 feet from the road if the cable company can basically say F you any time they want.

Stop calling and go into the local office. Contact the LOCAL construction manager.
--
If it's important, back it up... twice. Even 99.999% availability isn't enough sometimes.


SpottedCat

join:2004-06-27
Miami, FL
reply to point125
I'm curious.. when you pay $10K or whatever obscene amount to have cable brought out to your home, do you still have to pay the same amount for the service once they install it?

Or does part of that huge payment become a service credit? I know Comcast doesn't want to take a risk by spending thousands to run cable out to a home, only for the customer to cut service two months in... but if I paid such an outlandish cost for installation I'd expect some sort of a break on the service!

ExoticFish

join:2008-08-31
Stuarts Draft, VA
said by SpottedCat:

I'm curious.. when you pay $10K or whatever obscene amount to have cable brought out to your home, do you still have to pay the same amount for the service once they install it?

Absolutely !
--
»www.VAJeeps.com

rendrenner

join:2005-09-03
Grandville, MI
reply to SpottedCat
There is no discount on service for paying to have the cable installed. You may be put into a promo package like any onther new customer. That would defeat the whole purpose of ROI.


tshirt
Premium
join:2004-07-11
Snohomish, WA
kudos:5
If you are willing to pay $10k for the install, they don't need to offer a promo to get and keep your business.


SpottedCat

join:2004-06-27
Miami, FL
reply to rendrenner
said by rendrenner:

That would defeat the whole purpose of ROI.

But that's just, you PAID to have the cable installed. I can think of it as paying their "ROI" ahead of time, rather than them waiting for years to break even.

After all, they paid to run cable to many neighborhoods and homes in the past, without subscribers having to pay thousands. If a subscriber pays a large amount of money to help them expand their plant, they should be willing to give that subscriber a break in exchange for that.

I figured they'd be greedy about it though.


gar187er
I do this for a living

join:2006-06-24
Dover, DE
kudos:4
reply to point125
yes they are held by law to do that, but only to THEIR cable....they are responsible for it.....so when it gets cut/damaged, etc and starts causing issues for the whole note, comcast must fix it....that is why they wont allow you to do that. Rare circumstances it gets done, but yours isnt so rare...
--
I'm better than you!


gar187er
I do this for a living

join:2006-06-24
Dover, DE
kudos:4
reply to SpottedCat
neighborhoods = dozens and dozens of people...not just 1.....the OP needs 1000' plant extension....this equates to say 7 pole spans....7 x 4 (ports a tap) = 28 possible hooks in a fairly populated area....
--
I'm better than you!

point125

join:2012-08-06

said by DrDrew See Profile
Stop calling and go into the local office. Contact the LOCAL construction manager.

I did go to the local office, which was quite far out of the way. They were very nice and seemed to do everything they could with a smile, but they could not give me the number of anyone, only submit a form that seems like the same thing the CSR from 1800 were doing. I got the same line about plant extensions and figuring out if it was economically feasible. Explaining that I wanted to just pay for the extension got the same response that oh no they don't do that.

She did say that she would try to get someone to call me directly, but I have heard that already before, so I do not have high hopes.



tshirt
Premium
join:2004-07-11
Snohomish, WA
kudos:5
Reviews:
·Comcast
It may take some time before you hear back.
You may or may not ever see anyone. The first part is they research what they presently have in place, IF that is expandable, THEN someone comes out to measure/asess. Then they crunch the number and offer(by mail usually) an estmate and contract. Don't get too anxious even if it's a go, it could take months to get it completed.
They aren't being rude or mean, you are just one of many requests that they fit in between normal construction activity.

netuser2010

join:2010-07-06
reply to point125
We live in a rural area right outside of Richmond, VA. We paid Comcast approximately $3 per foot to extend their service to our home in 2010. The extension was approximately 1 mile. At first, we called our local office, but no one took us seriously. We had to write a letter to the local construction supervisor before we received a response. The construction supervisor then came out and did a site survey, then sent us a letter indicating the amount of money that they wanted to extend their service. After we signed the contract/letter that they sent us and paid for the extension, they then put us on the construction schedule. It took about 6 months from contacting the construction supervisor before they began construction. They buried the extension and put in several amplifiers along the way. It took about one week to complete. Let me know if you have any questions.