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beachintech
There's sand in my tool bag
Premium
join:2008-01-06
kudos:5

1 recommendation

reply to point125

Re: [Connectivity] "not servicable" despite trunk line

said by point125:

Like I said, they aren't interested in helping, aren't they legally required under most franchise agreements to make a connection so long as it's X number of feet from the public utility polls?

How does anyone build a house setback more than 100 feet from the road if the cable company can basically say F you any time they want.

You make arrangements \ do research BEFORE you buy the property and build a house there if cable is something you require.
--
Ex-Tech at the Beach.
I speak for myself, not my former employer.

bpratt

join:2006-10-24
Redwood City, CA

Unfortunately doing research or making arrangements doesn't always work, for instance when one buys a house before cable comes to the neighborhood, and when they do bring cable around they decide not to bother running it up your cul de sac. Especially in states like California, where franchise agreements are now done at the state level rather than the municipality, you are completely on your own when that happens, as we found out.

Not having Internet available at the house (we can't get DSL or decent wireless either) would cost us a lot more than $15-20K if we ever sell, so it was a no-brainer to foot the bill ourselves, but it's still irritating that Comcast could just decide to skip us, and that AT&T has no obligation to provide DSL along with voice telephony, when every residence on every side of our house does have both options.

Bob



beachintech
There's sand in my tool bag
Premium
join:2008-01-06
kudos:5

1 edit

Yes it does, then you would have known that you didn't have that option available when you bought the house and could make a decision to move forward with purchasing the property, or looking elsewhere.

I'm not referencing selling your house, only purchasing, like the subject in this thread. You chose to live there.
--
Ex-Tech at the Beach.
I speak for myself, not my former employer.


point125

join:2012-08-06
reply to beachintech

said by beachintech:

said by point125:

Like I said, they aren't interested in helping, aren't they legally required under most franchise agreements to make a connection so long as it's X number of feet from the public utility polls?

How does anyone build a house setback more than 100 feet from the road if the cable company can basically say F you any time they want.

You make arrangements \ do research BEFORE you buy the property and build a house there if cable is something you require.

What exactly do you think I'm doing?... I thought it was sort of clear that's exactly what I'm doing. But it seems ridiculous that any house more than a few hundred feet from the utility poles could be cut off anytime the cable company felt like it.


tshirt
Premium,MVM
join:2004-07-11
Snohomish, WA
kudos:5
Reviews:
·Comcast

said by point125:

But it seems ridiculous that any house more than a few hundred feet from the utility poles could be cut off anytime the cable company felt like it.

No they can't. That's why comcast goes through this process, right now they have told you "we are NOT legally obligated to serve your home" and "we will calculate the cost of putting a drop in" But once they return that bid, if you accept and return it with the proper payment and forms (ROW, etc.) they then ARE obligated to build, and maintain a drop FOREVER.
Most of the time when a cul-d-sac or other property is bypassed it is due to one of the specific "NOT SERVICABLE" exemptions in the Franchise or or state utility regulations. (usually RoW or setback issues)


DrDrew
That others may surf
Premium
join:2009-01-28
SoCal
kudos:15
reply to point125

said by point125:

.. it seems ridiculous that any house more than a few hundred feet from the utility poles could be cut off anytime the cable company felt like it.

Beyond a couple hundred feet the cable company HAS to install additional signal amplification equipment which needs power and access for regular maintenance. It's not just a "feeling" the cable company has, it's physics they have to obey.

Not everybody wants cable or the equipment on their property.

If it's a line passing through to feed OTHER customers, it's a totally different situation that involves utility easement permits that overrule individual landowner rights to a certain degree.
--
If it's important, back it up... twice. Even 99.999% availability isn't enough sometimes.


beachintech
There's sand in my tool bag
Premium
join:2008-01-06
kudos:5
reply to point125

said by point125:

said by beachintech:

said by point125:

Like I said, they aren't interested in helping, aren't they legally required under most franchise agreements to make a connection so long as it's X number of feet from the public utility polls?

How does anyone build a house setback more than 100 feet from the road if the cable company can basically say F you any time they want.

You make arrangements \ do research BEFORE you buy the property and build a house there if cable is something you require.

What exactly do you think I'm doing?... I thought it was sort of clear that's exactly what I'm doing. But it seems ridiculous that any house more than a few hundred feet from the utility poles could be cut off anytime the cable company felt like it.

Not at all - you made it sound like you own and live in the house already.
--
Ex-Tech at the Beach.
I speak for myself, not my former employer.

rody_44
Premium
join:2004-02-20
Quakertown, PA
Reviews:
·Comcast

1 edit
reply to point125

I also thought you owned the house. When you dont own the house it opens up a new can of worms. You need to enter into a agreement of sale and make it contingent on being able to have cable installed to the house before it goes anywhere. I just started one this week that was 2000 feet from the road with just that scenario. We were able to cut it down to 1150 feet by securing a ROW from the neighbor at the price of a years free cable. We installed conduit thru the ROW and will finish the buildout after closing. It cut the price down pretty much and cant be completed until after closing. My main point is other factors come into play. the cable company i work for was able to guarantee a price once the ROW was secured and the conduit installed. So the potential buyer was able to just pay that part until closing takes place. Personnaly if cable was a priority of mine i would just move on to the next house.


point125

join:2012-08-06
reply to beachintech

said by beachintech:

Not at all - you made it sound like you own and live in the house already.

I thought saying "a house I would like to move to" would indicate pretty well that I don't own it, but w/e.

said by rody_44:

When you dont own the house it opens up a new can of worms. You need to enter into a agreement of sale and make it contingent on being able to have cable installed to the house before it goes anywhere.

Wasn't an option, sellers wouldn't agree to contingency.

Anyway, I got an estimate of about $3k for the 1k foot run under ground. Relieved since I was preparing for much worse, but still a fortune when you shift back to the perspective of a normal view.

rody_44
Premium
join:2004-02-20
Quakertown, PA
Reviews:
·Comcast

Who did you get that estimate off of? I hope it was comcast. You wouldnt be the first person that paid someone to run cable only to find out its unusable. 3 dollars a foot for cable to be run underground is way to cheap. Makes sense if it was actually comcast since they usually eat the first 3thousand dollars in expense.


point125

join:2012-08-06

Yes it was comcast.



techguyga
Premium
join:2003-12-31
Buford, GA
Reviews:
·AT&T U-Verse
reply to point125

I was in a similar situation. My house is about 1000' to 1200' from the road where we have aerial cable and electricity running. At the time, we were serviced through Adelphia, now Comcast.

I called to have a site survey done. It took about 6 weeks for someone from engineering to come out and they originally told me that they would not build a line. A few more calls and visits to my local office got another engineer out and they quoted me $1800 for the build. Over the next few weeks, I had a couple more engineers come out and I eventually haggled with them and got them down to $400 for the build.

When I had electricity installed to the house, the power company set 3 new poles...2 of them were very tall and made for high-tension and the third was a smaller pole, about 75' from my home. They ran power between the 2 large poles, about 700' apart. They set a transformer on the closest high-tension pole to my home, ran a pigtail from that pole to the small one, then went underground from there.

The cable-co followed the same route. Aerial from the street to the first high-tension pole (~200'), aerial spanning the high-tension poles (~700'), then placed a tap at the closest high-tension pole. They placed an amp in-line at the farthest high-tension pole. I believe it was RG11 cable that they used from the street to the tap.

They then used RG6 from the tap to the small pole (~50') and then underground to the house (~75').

Reading what others are posting about pricing, I consider myself lucky to have gotten away with a $400 build-out charge. I would just stay on their case, while being polite, until you get someone who is willing to help you out. Just be aware that it can take a great deal of time for everything to happen.
--
My hourly rates:
$35 per hour.
$45 per hour if you want to watch.
$55 per hour if you want to help.
$100 per hour if you already tried to fix it.


point125

join:2012-08-06

Yea, they actually said it would only take 2 weeks to do once they had payment. And they also said doing it with poles would be cheaper, but that it would take much longer because of permits.



telcodad
Premium
join:2011-09-16
Lincroft, NJ
kudos:15
reply to point125

Just for reference, just saw this news item on the FierceCable site:

Comcast offers to deliver cable to Chappaquiddick for $1,526 per home
By Steve Donohue, FierceCable - September 17, 2012
»www.fiercecable.com/story/comcas···12-09-17

Also see: »www.mvgazette.com/article.php?46837



DrDrew
That others may surf
Premium
join:2009-01-28
SoCal
kudos:15

said by telcodad:

Just for reference, just saw this news item on the FierceCable site:

Comcast offers to deliver cable to Chappaquiddick for $1,526 per home
By Steve Donohue, FierceCable - September 17, 2012
»www.fiercecable.com/story/comcas···12-09-17

Also see: »www.mvgazette.com/article.php?46837

Should've posted more than just the headline and links:

said by Fiercecable article :
Under Comcast's 10-year franchise proposal, the MSO is asking Chappaquiddick residents to pay $824,000 to cover half of the costs of extending its network to the island. It would cost $1,526 per home if every home signed up for Comcast service, according to The Martha's Vineyard Times.

But some island residents have said they are concerned that it may cost them even more to receive Comcast's triple play, since the MSO says it would charge additional fees to residents whose homes are located more than 250 feet from its cable plant.
Basically it's costing Comcast $1.6 million to make a distribution network to offer service to 540 homes.
--
If it's important, back it up... twice. Even 99.999% availability isn't enough sometimes.


THZNDUP
Deorum Offensa Diis Curae
Premium
join:2003-09-18
Lard
kudos:2

That's $3K per home passed. What are the more valuable/premium systems being sold for nowdays?

The last I remember eons ago was about $2K per home passed (or was that per subscriber?).
--
one should not increase, beyond what is necessary, the number of entities required to explain anything



tshirt
Premium,MVM
join:2004-07-11
Snohomish, WA
kudos:5
Reviews:
·Comcast

Not suprizing the higher price.
Remember that Chappaquiddick is a seperate island at the west end of Martha's vinyard »maps.google.com/maps?q=Chappaqui···sQ_AUoAg so construcution invovles bring crews to wood's hole, take a ferry to MV and then another very short ferry to Chappaquiddick.
and then to avoid the commute everyday housing them on MV ($$$$) plus the houses are spread out and most are well off the road, with occupants likely to be VERY picky about the install and any percieved damages. It adds up fast.



DrDrew
That others may surf
Premium
join:2009-01-28
SoCal
kudos:15

1 recommendation

reply to THZNDUP

said by THZNDUP:

That's $3K per home passed. What are the more valuable/premium systems being sold for nowdays?

The last I remember eons ago was about $2K per home passed (or was that per subscriber?).

TWC bought Newave customers in Kentucky and Tennessee last year for $3700/subscriber:
»www.trefis.com/stock/twc/article···11-06-23

TWC's purchase of Insight Communicastion's Ohio, Kentucky and Indiana systems, employees, 750,000 customers was $3 Billion or $4000/customer:
»www.bizjournals.com/columbus/new···-of.html
--
If it's important, back it up... twice. Even 99.999% availability isn't enough sometimes.


THZNDUP
Deorum Offensa Diis Curae
Premium
join:2003-09-18
Lard
kudos:2
reply to tshirt

I didn't think the $3K/HP was that far out of line especally for a premium, low density area. I was just looking for some current real pricing and conversion to that metric. Comcast wanting half that reflects what they feel they need to 'make money' on a new build.

I'd like to see the marketing projections used for the financial analysis of the project though. They're always fun to look at. The engineering end is/was pretty straight forward especially at this stage.
--
one should not increase, beyond what is necessary, the number of entities required to explain anything



THZNDUP
Deorum Offensa Diis Curae
Premium
join:2003-09-18
Lard
kudos:2
reply to DrDrew

Thanks!

Looks like the $3K/HP isn't too far out of reason, just that Comcast seems to think it should be half that to meet their financial requirements and rate of return.

Getting a good metric for a new build with subscriber estimates versus established systems and proven cash flow can get........interesting.
--
one should not increase, beyond what is necessary, the number of entities required to explain anything



DrDrew
That others may surf
Premium
join:2009-01-28
SoCal
kudos:15

said by THZNDUP:

Thanks!

Looks like the $3K/HP isn't too far out of reason, just that Comcast seems to think it should be half that to meet their financial requirements and rate of return.

Getting a good metric for a new build with subscriber estimates versus established systems and proven cash flow can get........interesting.

That $3k Comcast cost is per home passed, not per customer which is what the links I posted had stats for.

That $3k also doesn't cover the install from the plant to the TV/PC/phone for homes that actually want some service. Looking at Google maps sat view I can see most of those homes are set WAY back and will take extra work to hook up.
--
If it's important, back it up... twice. Even 99.999% availability isn't enough sometimes.


THZNDUP
Deorum Offensa Diis Curae
Premium
join:2003-09-18
Lard
kudos:2

The way I read the article, around $1,500 is Comcast's maximum cost per home passed..........

The second article telcodad See Profile posted has a bit more info:

...
According to the Comcast proposal there are 540 homes on Chappaquiddick. With 100 per cent participation, the one-time fee paid by a subscriber would be $1,526. With 40 per cent participation, the one-time fee would be $3,815. The proposal requires a minimum 40 per cent participation and a commitment by homeowners to subscribe year-round for two years.
...

Right back up in the $3K-$4K market.

The extra 'over 250ft long drop' charges would be paid for by the homeowner, although getting the heavier construction done in conjunction with the plant should be a no-brainer, they will know who and where the 40% minimum is. Hopefully the people would have a good idea of what those charges would be prior to making any commitment.

I wonder what level(s) of service are required for that two year contract. Somehow I don't think Limited Basic is going to be a big factor in Comcast's plans.
--
one should not increase, beyond what is necessary, the number of entities required to explain anything


telcodad
Premium
join:2011-09-16
Lincroft, NJ
kudos:15

BTW - it looks like Comcast's proposal did not get a good reception from Chappaquiddick's residents:

Comcast turns off Chappy residents with offer of cable service
By Steve Myrick, The Martha's Vineyard Times - September 19, 2012
»www.mvtimes.com/2012/09/19/comca···e-12580/

and:

Editorial : Comcast prices Chappy service, but does it really want to deal
The Martha's Vineyard Times - September 19, 2012
»www.mvtimes.com/2012/09/19/edito···l-12585/

But, there is a wireless internet service available on the island provided by a resident and local businessman:

Wireless Internet has a home on Chappaquiddick
By Tony Omer, The Martha's Vineyard Times - September 19, 2012
»www.mvtimes.com/2012/09/19/wirel···k-12548/