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sk1939
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join:2010-10-23
Mclean, VA
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2 recommendations

Old Power Tools

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Delta Drill Press Model DP-220 Circa 1952
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Delta Lathe - Model 2 Circa 1930's
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Delta Lathe - Model 2 Badge
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Craftsman King-Seeley Table Saw Model No. 103.22160 - Circa 1952
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Craftsman King-Seeley Table Saw Model No. 103.22160 - Circa 1952
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Craftsman King-Seeley Table Saw Model No. 103.22160 - Circa 1952
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Craftsman King-Seeley Table Saw Model No. 103.22160 - Circa 1952
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Shopmate Model 1818 Type 1 Sabre Saw - Circa Mid 1960's
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Shopmate Model 1818 Type 1 Sabre Saw
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Shopmate Model 1818 Type 1 Sabre Saw
For anyone who has a love of the antique:


mityfowl
Premium
join:2000-11-06
Dallas, TX

I'm pretty sure my father had that Sears table saw.

He bought it used in about '54-'55.

A real beast when he fired it up.



Jack_in_VA
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join:2007-11-26
North, VA
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reply to sk1939

said by sk1939:

For anyone who has a love of the antique:



Thanks so much for sharing with us. Some of us are old enough to remember some of them.

Zach1
Premium
join:2006-11-26
NW Minnesota

said by Jack_in_VA:

said by sk1939:

For anyone who has a love of the antique:



Thanks so much for sharing with us. Some of us are old enough to remember some of them.

+1

Yes Sir. The drill press in the picture looks just like the 1950 model in my shop. Also have a 1954 Delta table saw. Both run like new after all of these years. Gone are the days of tools that last virtually forever.
--
Zach


drjim
Premium,MVM
join:2000-06-13
Long Beach, CA
kudos:3
reply to sk1939

I've still got the Craftsman 1/4" electric drill my Dad bought when I was 8 years old.
Going on over 50 years now, and it still works perfectly!
--
One man's Magic is another man's Engineering.


telco_mtl

join:2012-01-06
reply to sk1939

my next door neighbor has a similar table saw, works great but scary as hell, no guard on the blade. Back when these tools were made a lot didnt come with motors, you would buy your choice of motor, like my neighbors table saw.

Old tools had user serviceable parts too, my 1965 B&D sabre saw has replaceable motor brushes, today you buy a new one!


sk1939
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Mclean, VA
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1 edit

said by telco_mtl:

my next door neighbor has a similar table saw, works great but scary as hell, no guard on the blade.

From what I can tell, this is the first table saw from Craftsman to have a guard on the blade. It is rather scary to use, the motor is original (GE), as is the cord. The motor connects to a switched outlet attached to that base, which in turn plugs into the wall. The entire unit is ungrounded (all of the larger tools are that way of course, given their age).

said by telco_mtl:

Old tools had user serviceable parts too, my 1965 B&D sabre saw has replaceable motor brushes, today you buy a new one!

Depends, my Rigid power drill from 2010 still allows you to replace the motor brushes, and they will provide them free so long as you have registered the tool.

sk1939
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Mclean, VA
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reply to Jack_in_VA

said by Jack_in_VA:

said by sk1939:

For anyone who has a love of the antique:



Thanks so much for sharing with us. Some of us are old enough to remember some of them.

Glad to have brought back some memories.

All of these tools are still in use, although parts for some (like the lathe) are near impossible to find. The motors on both the drill press and the lathe have been replaced for various reasons, but the motors on the saws are both original.

I have some other tools floating around that I will post pictures of later if anyone is interested.


Hall
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join:2000-04-28
Germantown, OH
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reply to sk1939

I'll bet that jigsaw weighs a ton !


sk1939
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Mclean, VA
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said by Hall:

I'll bet that jigsaw weighs a ton !

It's not as heavy as you would think given it's construction (about 5lbs). My (newish) Milwaukee is about the same weight, but I would trust the Shopmate better for longetivity and durability.


Hall
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join:2000-04-28
Germantown, OH
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But the casing of that is made of some exotic material we don't see in tools much nowadays.... Isn't it called "metal" ?



ilikeme
I live in a van down by the river.
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Sugar Land, TX
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reply to drjim

said by drjim:

I've still got the Craftsman 1/4" electric drill my Dad bought when I was 8 years old.
Going on over 50 years now, and it still works perfectly!

I still have my dads Craftsman drill that he bought in the late 60's or early 70's. Still works great.

sk1939
Premium
join:2010-10-23
Mclean, VA
kudos:10
reply to Hall

Yessir, they just don't make them like that anymore.


telco_mtl

join:2012-01-06

i have my dads old single speed non reversable drill, cant remember the make, but its solid as hell, use it to stir paint and joint compound!


garys_2k
Premium
join:2004-05-07
Farmington, MI
reply to sk1939

Yeah, my father had one of those table saws, too. I still remember the whine it made when running. Awesome to a young kid's ears...



KrK
Heavy Artillery For The Little Guy
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join:2000-01-17
Tulsa, OK
reply to sk1939

.... and they'll still work in 2050's



pike
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join:2001-02-01
Washington, DC
kudos:3
reply to sk1939

Thanks for sharing, interesting stuff! They sure don't make them like they used to.

The metal sabre saw reminded me of a video I had to watch during a week-long NFPA arc flash certification class about 10 years ago. A guy using a very similar saw learned a painful lesson about using cheater plugs. I don't remember the specifics, but the metal casing became energized and he was burned so badly, from the inside out, eventually his entire arm had to be amputated.


sk1939
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Mclean, VA
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said by pike:

A guy using a very similar saw learned a painful lesson about using cheater plugs.

Ironic that you mention that, because when I got that saw it had exactly that on the end of the plug (with the ground wire on the cheater removed of course).


Jim
Premium
join:2003-02-10
reply to sk1939

Click for full size
These old Shopsmiths are a dime a dozen. This one belonged to my grandfather and my uncle. I still have the original receipt from (I think) 1952. I only use it now as a drill press or for horizontal boring.
--
Blasting, billowing, bursting forth
With the power of ten billion butterfly sneezes

telco_mtl

join:2012-01-06

said by Jim:

These old Shopsmiths are a dime a dozen. This one belonged to my grandfather and my uncle. I still have the original receipt from (I think) 1952. I only use it now as a drill press or for horizontal boring.

i have some old home improvement books from the 60s that used to sing the praises of these things! i never saw one in real life though!


drjim
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join:2000-06-13
Long Beach, CA
kudos:3

1 edit

All these tools were made when they were an investment by the buyer. As such, they were expected to last a long time, and be user serviceable.
My Dad's old drill has replaceable brushes, and the manual came with an exploded view, listing all the parts with their Sear's part numbers.
It's a far cry from the $8.99 1/4" drill I bought at Harbor Freight when I wanted something CHEEP to buff out the clear headlights on my wife's car!
--
One man's Magic is another man's Engineering.


telco_mtl

join:2012-01-06

i know, its pretty sad i find, look at clint eastwood the way he describes his tool collection in grand torino



nonameyet
I Make Them Ring..Ring
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Sellersville, PA
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reply to sk1939

Click for full size
craftsman drill press
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kennedy tool box
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craftsman 6
My Dad's Old tools, Still work. Circa 1950.


shdesigns
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Stone Mountain, GA
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said by nonameyet:

My Dad's Old tools, Still work. Circa 1950.



I have that lathes big, older brother (Circa 1941);)
--
Scott Henion

Embedded Systems Consultant,
SHDesigns home - DIY Welder


caffeinator
Coming soon to a cup near you..
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join:2005-01-16
WA, USA
kudos:4
reply to sk1939

Nice stuff....man, wish I had some of my Dad's tools as some were over 100yrs old. But, I do have a nice 1950's era toolbox.


The Box.



Nevermind that mess...


IDK who made it as there are no markings. I got it about 20 years ago from a friend who was leaving the country and couldn't take it with him. He was 40-ish then, and said it had belonged to his Dad.

It's a bit rough, but it's still solid as hell. I've used it to stand on many times. It's heavy, good 'ol steel and fire engine red. I love it.
--

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mityfowl
Premium
join:2000-11-06
Dallas, TX
reply to sk1939

It's going to be a few months before I get back to N. Illinois to show you guys my dad 1st project with that table saw.

I think it was 1955-56.

You will be impressed.

He was quite the craftsman. We had a lathe too.


telco_mtl

join:2012-01-06
reply to sk1939

i enjoy visiting houses on open house days, i especially love 50s and 60s houses. they date to an era when every man was expected to be handy and know how to fix things, they generally all have a workshop. I love the look of a good workshop, no matter how small, and think of the things fixed there from lamps to kids toys. Houses built after that that ive seen rarely if ever have any kind of shop area, kinda sad in my opinion



drjim
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join:2000-06-13
Long Beach, CA
kudos:3

Yep, I agree it's very sad. We really need more vocational schools. Not everybody is cut out for, or should, go to College.
When I was in high-school back in the middle 60's, I wanted to take General Shop. My "counselor", looking at nothing more than my test scores, said no, because "Shop was for dummies"!
I old my parents what he'd said when I got home, and my Dad, a Tool and Die Maker, called the school to make an appointment with my counselor.
I never heard what he told the counselor, but the next day I was signed up for the shop class.
Call me old-fashioned, but I grew up in an era like what telco_mtl describes. Men were EXPECTED to know how to fix things, and get them fixed, even if it meant getting dirty and sweaty.
Today it just us "hobbyists" for have an appreciation of things like the old tools in this thread, and who know how to use them.
Very sad indeed......
--
One man's Magic is another man's Engineering.


sk1939
Premium
join:2010-10-23
Mclean, VA
kudos:10
reply to mityfowl

I look forward to it.

I still use em, once I get back I'll show you the TV stand I built a week or so ago.



Lurch77
Premium
join:2001-11-22
Oconto, WI
kudos:4
reply to sk1939

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I have this monstrous old Buffalo Forge drill press from 1974. It was a military tool, I got it for free when some jar heads in the squadron next to us were going to toss it. Overkill for my garage shop, but it will never die and will never come up short on a job.