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drjim
Premium,MVM
join:2000-06-13
Long Beach, CA
kudos:3

1 edit
reply to telco_mtl

Re: Old Power Tools

All these tools were made when they were an investment by the buyer. As such, they were expected to last a long time, and be user serviceable.
My Dad's old drill has replaceable brushes, and the manual came with an exploded view, listing all the parts with their Sear's part numbers.
It's a far cry from the $8.99 1/4" drill I bought at Harbor Freight when I wanted something CHEEP to buff out the clear headlights on my wife's car!
--
One man's Magic is another man's Engineering.


telco_mtl

join:2012-01-06

i know, its pretty sad i find, look at clint eastwood the way he describes his tool collection in grand torino



nonameyet
I Make Them Ring..Ring
Premium
join:2000-12-19
Sellersville, PA
Reviews:
·Comcast
reply to sk1939

Click for full size
craftsman drill press
Click for full size
kennedy tool box
Click for full size
craftsman 6
My Dad's Old tools, Still work. Circa 1950.


shdesigns
Powered By Infinite Improbabilty Drive
Premium
join:2000-12-01
Stone Mountain, GA
Reviews:
·Atlantic Nexus

said by nonameyet:

My Dad's Old tools, Still work. Circa 1950.



I have that lathes big, older brother (Circa 1941);)
--
Scott Henion

Embedded Systems Consultant,
SHDesigns home - DIY Welder


caffeinator
Coming soon to a cup near you..
Premium
join:2005-01-16
WA, USA
kudos:4
reply to sk1939

Nice stuff....man, wish I had some of my Dad's tools as some were over 100yrs old. But, I do have a nice 1950's era toolbox.


The Box.



Nevermind that mess...


IDK who made it as there are no markings. I got it about 20 years ago from a friend who was leaving the country and couldn't take it with him. He was 40-ish then, and said it had belonged to his Dad.

It's a bit rough, but it's still solid as hell. I've used it to stand on many times. It's heavy, good 'ol steel and fire engine red. I love it.
--

My 9/11 Tribute..online since 9/14/01
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mityfowl
Premium
join:2000-11-06
Dallas, TX
reply to sk1939

It's going to be a few months before I get back to N. Illinois to show you guys my dad 1st project with that table saw.

I think it was 1955-56.

You will be impressed.

He was quite the craftsman. We had a lathe too.


telco_mtl

join:2012-01-06
reply to sk1939

i enjoy visiting houses on open house days, i especially love 50s and 60s houses. they date to an era when every man was expected to be handy and know how to fix things, they generally all have a workshop. I love the look of a good workshop, no matter how small, and think of the things fixed there from lamps to kids toys. Houses built after that that ive seen rarely if ever have any kind of shop area, kinda sad in my opinion



drjim
Premium,MVM
join:2000-06-13
Long Beach, CA
kudos:3

Yep, I agree it's very sad. We really need more vocational schools. Not everybody is cut out for, or should, go to College.
When I was in high-school back in the middle 60's, I wanted to take General Shop. My "counselor", looking at nothing more than my test scores, said no, because "Shop was for dummies"!
I old my parents what he'd said when I got home, and my Dad, a Tool and Die Maker, called the school to make an appointment with my counselor.
I never heard what he told the counselor, but the next day I was signed up for the shop class.
Call me old-fashioned, but I grew up in an era like what telco_mtl describes. Men were EXPECTED to know how to fix things, and get them fixed, even if it meant getting dirty and sweaty.
Today it just us "hobbyists" for have an appreciation of things like the old tools in this thread, and who know how to use them.
Very sad indeed......
--
One man's Magic is another man's Engineering.


sk1939
Premium
join:2010-10-23
Mclean, VA
kudos:10
reply to mityfowl

I look forward to it.

I still use em, once I get back I'll show you the TV stand I built a week or so ago.



Lurch77
Premium
join:2001-11-22
Oconto, WI
kudos:4
reply to sk1939

Click for full size
Click for full size
Click for full size
I have this monstrous old Buffalo Forge drill press from 1974. It was a military tool, I got it for free when some jar heads in the squadron next to us were going to toss it. Overkill for my garage shop, but it will never die and will never come up short on a job.


chmod
Premium
join:2000-12-12
Lockport, IL
reply to nonameyet

I have that same tool box.



caffeinator
Coming soon to a cup near you..
Premium
join:2005-01-16
WA, USA
kudos:4

said by chmod:

I have that same tool box.

Cool.

Do you know happen to know anything about it?

telco_mtl

join:2012-01-06
reply to drjim

i often reget listening to my highschool guidance counsellor for telling me to go into I.T. when i initially wanted to go into electricity, but tradeschools as you said above "trades are for dummies" im the guy in my circle of friends who is proud to drive a beater, scour U-pull yards for the best parts deals, all my buddies tell me i could easily afford a new car why dont i get one, i like the feeling of fixing it myself, so what if its off the road sometimes for a couple of days, my 2 beaters cost me less than their lease!



drjim
Premium,MVM
join:2000-06-13
Long Beach, CA
kudos:3

Yeah, I've been 'tinkering' with stuff since I was 10 years old. The General Shop class I wanted to take was 6 weeks of wood shop, 6 weeks of metal shop, 6 weeks of automotive, etc until the school year was finished.
I aced all of them, and learned a lot of things I didn't know, and have never forgotten.
I'm sure dear old Dad reamed the counselor a new one, as he seemed a bit miffed at me when I went to pick up my new class schedule!
--
One man's Magic is another man's Engineering.



Nick_L
Premium
join:2003-01-22
Pittsburgh, PA
reply to Lurch77

Wow. Surely this is what H.H. Geiger had in mind when he designed 'Alien'. It's scary just as it is.



Coma
Thanks Steve
Premium
join:2001-12-30
NirvanaLand


But I always wondered what the tire was for ?

--
August is National Eye Exam Month


telco_mtl

join:2012-01-06
reply to drjim

said by drjim:

Yeah, I've been 'tinkering' with stuff since I was 10 years old. The General Shop class I wanted to take was 6 weeks of wood shop, 6 weeks of metal shop, 6 weeks of automotive, etc until the school year was finished.
I aced all of them, and learned a lot of things I didn't know, and have never forgotten.
I'm sure dear old Dad reamed the counselor a new one, as he seemed a bit miffed at me when I went to pick up my new class schedule!

i have dealt with a lot of engineers in my career and its discouraging the amount of them that cant take things to practice after designing them. I am amazed how easy it is today for me to make a little extra pocket money simply doing "handyman" stuff for people, its simply because people dont know how to do things anymore


Jack_in_VA
Premium
join:2007-11-26
North, VA
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Millenicom

said by telco_mtl:

said by drjim:

Yeah, I've been 'tinkering' with stuff since I was 10 years old. The General Shop class I wanted to take was 6 weeks of wood shop, 6 weeks of metal shop, 6 weeks of automotive, etc until the school year was finished.
I aced all of them, and learned a lot of things I didn't know, and have never forgotten.
I'm sure dear old Dad reamed the counselor a new one, as he seemed a bit miffed at me when I went to pick up my new class schedule!

i have dealt with a lot of engineers in my career and its discouraging the amount of them that cant take things to practice after designing them. I am amazed how easy it is today for me to make a little extra pocket money simply doing "handyman" stuff for people, its simply because people dont know how to do things anymore

I've observed the same thing and it's one reason we are falling behind in the world.

People now are helpless unless it can be texted, tweeted, or found on X-Box.

telco_mtl

join:2012-01-06

said by Jack_in_VA:

said by telco_mtl:

said by drjim:

Yeah, I've been 'tinkering' with stuff since I was 10 years old. The General Shop class I wanted to take was 6 weeks of wood shop, 6 weeks of metal shop, 6 weeks of automotive, etc until the school year was finished.
I aced all of them, and learned a lot of things I didn't know, and have never forgotten.
I'm sure dear old Dad reamed the counselor a new one, as he seemed a bit miffed at me when I went to pick up my new class schedule!

i have dealt with a lot of engineers in my career and its discouraging the amount of them that cant take things to practice after designing them. I am amazed how easy it is today for me to make a little extra pocket money simply doing "handyman" stuff for people, its simply because people dont know how to do things anymore

I've observed the same thing and it's one reason we are falling behind in the world.

People now are helpless unless it can be texted, tweeted, or found on X-Box.

a big sign of what is happening is our "home improvement" shows on TV there was a time in the 80s when they used to show us how to do the nitty gritty, install a sub panel, sweat pipe, install a receptacle. today they are all about paint and wallpaper, same goes for magazines, i remember certain magazines used to be about home improvement and car repair, now sadly they hardly have any of that stuff. Its like the places we buy from, i remember when i was a kid heading down to one of the 3 local lumberyards. They were classic hardware stores on steroids, nothing pretty but had everything you need and were staffed with guys who knew their product and if they didnt have an item could tell you where to go. Today those 3 yards as well as my 2 favorite local hardware stores are gone. Now all i have in my direct area are 3 of the big home center places, while they may be pretty to shop at they are not the old hardware and lumberyard. but this can be attributed to the fact "we dont know how to do anything anymore" It can easily be seen on garbage day by what people throw out. My neighbor loves it, he is retired and fixes small engines in his spare time. He pulls lawnmowers out of the trash, cleans the carb, changes the oil and paints them and sells for a profit. 30 years ago most people i know would have done all that prior to simply tossing it.

sorry im going in circles its just this is a subject that really gets me going, and its the same in the US as in Canada, people are becomming helpless. This isnt good, we have become 2 nations of button pushers.


Jack_in_VA
Premium
join:2007-11-26
North, VA
kudos:1

+1


telco_mtl

join:2012-01-06

said by Jack_in_VA:

+1

jack, im glad we agree!


SparkChaser
Premium
join:2000-06-06
Downingtown, PA
kudos:3
Reviews:
·Verizon FiOS
reply to telco_mtl

said by telco_mtl:

i have dealt with a lot of engineers in my career and its discouraging the amount of them that cant take things to practice after designing them. I am amazed how easy it is today for me to make a little extra pocket money simply doing "handyman" stuff for people, its simply because people dont know how to do things anymore

/rant on
I saw this start the early 90's and has just gotten worse. There seem to be few engineers that have any practical skills. To make it worse you now have 'human resources' putting people though a battery of tests and interviews by people who don't have a clue. The clueless interviewing the clueless.
/rant off

Glad I'm retired

--
--
--
"Facts do not cease to exist because they are ignored." - Aldous Huxley

"I’m not familiar precisely with exactly what I said, but I stand by what I said, whatever it was.." - Mitt Romney


Coma
Thanks Steve
Premium
join:2001-12-30
NirvanaLand

said by SparkChaser:

Glad I'm retired


+1



--
August is National Eye Exam Month


drjim
Premium,MVM
join:2000-06-13
Long Beach, CA
kudos:3
reply to telco_mtl

Boy, you sure have that right!
I'm an Engineer, but I'm a hands-on guy. The young guys I work with don't know which end of a soldering iron to pick up, or how to hold a screwdriver so if it slips you won't jab yourself in the hand!
When I look at the great things our Country has done, and the incredible feats of Civil Engineering (Hoover Dam), Mechanical Engineering (mass produced V8 engines), and Electrical Engineering (the power grid), it really make me scratch my head and wonder how we got here.
We not only couldn't build projects like that any more due to the lack of "Hands On" people it takes to drive a project of that magnitude, we also lack the will to do great things like that.
--
One man's Magic is another man's Engineering.



Hall
Premium,MVM
join:2000-04-28
Germantown, OH
kudos:2

I have a Mechanical Design (Engineering, A.S.) degree and have always considered those with hands-on experience in machining, for example, to have a leg-up on me... I did have a "Machine Tools" class in college for (1) quarter but it was 99% book and 1% hands-on. We used a lathe ONE TIME.


telco_mtl

join:2012-01-06
reply to drjim

said by drjim:

Boy, you sure have that right!
I'm an Engineer, but I'm a hands-on guy. The young guys I work with don't know which end of a soldering iron to pick up, or how to hold a screwdriver so if it slips you won't jab yourself in the hand!
When I look at the great things our Country has done, and the incredible feats of Civil Engineering (Hoover Dam), Mechanical Engineering (mass produced V8 engines), and Electrical Engineering (the power grid), it really make me scratch my head and wonder how we got here.
We not only couldn't build projects like that any more due to the lack of "Hands On" people it takes to drive a project of that magnitude, we also lack the will to do great things like that.

i work near the st-lawrence seaway and everyday i look at that thing, in the 1950s Canada and the US built a canal capable of moving ocean going (at the time) vessels to the great lakes, they built a lake between cornwall ontario and lake ontario, built a staircase around niagara falls. When you look at the companies that provided the equipment, canadian vickers, marine industries to name 2 neither are around. on the canadian side since we dont have legislation like you guys have our ship building industry is dead...

it really is sad.


fcisler
Premium
join:2004-06-14
Riverhead, NY
reply to sk1939

Click for full size
Click for full size
I'll add mine in here...

1948 (i believe ) dewalt model GP. I have since rebuilt the whole table with marine grade plywood. This was given to me by a family friend. He restored the whole unit, 100%, and used it with the proper blade to cut aluminium bracing!

The table saw is a late 50's model craftsman. Model 100 if i recall correctly. In transit the motor shaft got hit hard. This caused the cooling fins (pictured) to smash into the coils - burning up the motor. The cost to rewire was pretty prohibitive - so it now has a brand new leeson motor on it.

Not sure that the switch is proper BUT it is a double pole (240v) switch - it gets the job done.

Gets used several times a month. FAR more accurate and cuts a cleaner edge then most of my friends modern tools.


Nick_L
Premium
join:2003-01-22
Pittsburgh, PA
reply to sk1939

Holy Crap! I didn't realize that I'd stumbled into a major meeting of the Cranky Old Man Club!

-How many of you can plow several acres of ground, plant season appropriate vegetables, harvest them and put them up for preserves, WITHOUT those yard tractors that you love to go on about?

-How many of you can navigate from one end of your state to the other on horseback. without maps, without gps, without stopping at McDonald's for food?

-How many of you can change an old wooden buggy wheel?

How many of you can spin cotton into thread, weave it into cloth, dye it with roots and berries and turn it into functional clothing.

-How many of you can chase down a buffalo on horseback, bring it down with stone-tipped arrows, gut it and preserve it with brine for the winter?

-How man of you can get plopped down in the middle of a forest with an axe and make a home for yourself and your family?

-How many of you can skin and animal carcass, clean the skin, tan it, preserve it and make it into boots and clothes?

I think yesterday's cranky-old-men clubs would think that all of us are a bit lazy too!

-How many of you know how to take apart your iPods to replace a dead battery, with only a file?

-How many of you know how to search the torrents for the latest bootlegged Peter Jackson footage?

-How many of you can type 60 words a minute on your smart phones?

-How many of you know how to mod the latest X-Box or PS3 boards?

-How many of you can create a web page with just a text editor and HTML5 tags?

-How many of you understand the latest revisions of the HDMI specs and what that means for hooking up your equipment?

-How many of you could pilot a drone aircraft from thousands of miles away with accuracy?

My bet is that you've already been rendered obsolete by tomorrow's Cranky-old-men as well. Point being, human beings have had different skill sets throughout the history of the species. Somehow we have managed to make it this far. It seems unlikely that we are going to be the last decent, hard working generation before it all goes straight to hell.

That being said, and to bring it back to the topic of old tools, I do absolutely think that the practice of making tools, and other equipment, of more long-lasting materials and making them repairable instead of simply disposable, did foster an atmosphere of curiosity and innovation that doesn't exist as much in today's society. I also absolutely agree that in today's global society where we centralize the manufacture of electronics, equipment, etc. to one or two places, that we make sure that we retain the ability to make those things locally as well. We need to make sure that we have the capability of manufacturing critical equipment and supplies in the case of disaster or war.

In summary (or TL;DR for you youngsters): Remember the past, look to the future and hang on to quality, from any era.



Coma
Thanks Steve
Premium
join:2001-12-30
NirvanaLand

said by Nick_L:

Remember the past, look to the future and hang on to quality


. . . or to put it another way . . . you get what you pay for !

--
August is National Eye Exam Month


Lurch77
Premium
join:2001-11-22
Oconto, WI
kudos:4

1 recommendation

reply to Coma

said by Coma:


But I always wondered what the tire was for ?

In my picture? That's the spare tire mounted to my trailer tongue.