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telco_mtl

join:2012-01-06
reply to Jack_in_VA

Re: Old Power Tools

said by Jack_in_VA:

+1

jack, im glad we agree!


SparkChaser
Premium
join:2000-06-06
Downingtown, PA
kudos:3
Reviews:
·Verizon FiOS
reply to telco_mtl

said by telco_mtl:

i have dealt with a lot of engineers in my career and its discouraging the amount of them that cant take things to practice after designing them. I am amazed how easy it is today for me to make a little extra pocket money simply doing "handyman" stuff for people, its simply because people dont know how to do things anymore

/rant on
I saw this start the early 90's and has just gotten worse. There seem to be few engineers that have any practical skills. To make it worse you now have 'human resources' putting people though a battery of tests and interviews by people who don't have a clue. The clueless interviewing the clueless.
/rant off

Glad I'm retired

--
--
--
"Facts do not cease to exist because they are ignored." - Aldous Huxley

"I’m not familiar precisely with exactly what I said, but I stand by what I said, whatever it was.." - Mitt Romney


Coma
Thanks Steve
Premium
join:2001-12-30
NirvanaLand

said by SparkChaser:

Glad I'm retired


+1



--
August is National Eye Exam Month


drjim
Premium,MVM
join:2000-06-13
Long Beach, CA
kudos:3
reply to telco_mtl

Boy, you sure have that right!
I'm an Engineer, but I'm a hands-on guy. The young guys I work with don't know which end of a soldering iron to pick up, or how to hold a screwdriver so if it slips you won't jab yourself in the hand!
When I look at the great things our Country has done, and the incredible feats of Civil Engineering (Hoover Dam), Mechanical Engineering (mass produced V8 engines), and Electrical Engineering (the power grid), it really make me scratch my head and wonder how we got here.
We not only couldn't build projects like that any more due to the lack of "Hands On" people it takes to drive a project of that magnitude, we also lack the will to do great things like that.
--
One man's Magic is another man's Engineering.



Hall
Premium,MVM
join:2000-04-28
Germantown, OH
kudos:2

I have a Mechanical Design (Engineering, A.S.) degree and have always considered those with hands-on experience in machining, for example, to have a leg-up on me... I did have a "Machine Tools" class in college for (1) quarter but it was 99% book and 1% hands-on. We used a lathe ONE TIME.


telco_mtl

join:2012-01-06
reply to drjim

said by drjim:

Boy, you sure have that right!
I'm an Engineer, but I'm a hands-on guy. The young guys I work with don't know which end of a soldering iron to pick up, or how to hold a screwdriver so if it slips you won't jab yourself in the hand!
When I look at the great things our Country has done, and the incredible feats of Civil Engineering (Hoover Dam), Mechanical Engineering (mass produced V8 engines), and Electrical Engineering (the power grid), it really make me scratch my head and wonder how we got here.
We not only couldn't build projects like that any more due to the lack of "Hands On" people it takes to drive a project of that magnitude, we also lack the will to do great things like that.

i work near the st-lawrence seaway and everyday i look at that thing, in the 1950s Canada and the US built a canal capable of moving ocean going (at the time) vessels to the great lakes, they built a lake between cornwall ontario and lake ontario, built a staircase around niagara falls. When you look at the companies that provided the equipment, canadian vickers, marine industries to name 2 neither are around. on the canadian side since we dont have legislation like you guys have our ship building industry is dead...

it really is sad.


fcisler
Premium
join:2004-06-14
Riverhead, NY
reply to sk1939

Click for full size
Click for full size
I'll add mine in here...

1948 (i believe ) dewalt model GP. I have since rebuilt the whole table with marine grade plywood. This was given to me by a family friend. He restored the whole unit, 100%, and used it with the proper blade to cut aluminium bracing!

The table saw is a late 50's model craftsman. Model 100 if i recall correctly. In transit the motor shaft got hit hard. This caused the cooling fins (pictured) to smash into the coils - burning up the motor. The cost to rewire was pretty prohibitive - so it now has a brand new leeson motor on it.

Not sure that the switch is proper BUT it is a double pole (240v) switch - it gets the job done.

Gets used several times a month. FAR more accurate and cuts a cleaner edge then most of my friends modern tools.


Nick_L
Premium
join:2003-01-22
Pittsburgh, PA
reply to sk1939

Holy Crap! I didn't realize that I'd stumbled into a major meeting of the Cranky Old Man Club!

-How many of you can plow several acres of ground, plant season appropriate vegetables, harvest them and put them up for preserves, WITHOUT those yard tractors that you love to go on about?

-How many of you can navigate from one end of your state to the other on horseback. without maps, without gps, without stopping at McDonald's for food?

-How many of you can change an old wooden buggy wheel?

How many of you can spin cotton into thread, weave it into cloth, dye it with roots and berries and turn it into functional clothing.

-How many of you can chase down a buffalo on horseback, bring it down with stone-tipped arrows, gut it and preserve it with brine for the winter?

-How man of you can get plopped down in the middle of a forest with an axe and make a home for yourself and your family?

-How many of you can skin and animal carcass, clean the skin, tan it, preserve it and make it into boots and clothes?

I think yesterday's cranky-old-men clubs would think that all of us are a bit lazy too!

-How many of you know how to take apart your iPods to replace a dead battery, with only a file?

-How many of you know how to search the torrents for the latest bootlegged Peter Jackson footage?

-How many of you can type 60 words a minute on your smart phones?

-How many of you know how to mod the latest X-Box or PS3 boards?

-How many of you can create a web page with just a text editor and HTML5 tags?

-How many of you understand the latest revisions of the HDMI specs and what that means for hooking up your equipment?

-How many of you could pilot a drone aircraft from thousands of miles away with accuracy?

My bet is that you've already been rendered obsolete by tomorrow's Cranky-old-men as well. Point being, human beings have had different skill sets throughout the history of the species. Somehow we have managed to make it this far. It seems unlikely that we are going to be the last decent, hard working generation before it all goes straight to hell.

That being said, and to bring it back to the topic of old tools, I do absolutely think that the practice of making tools, and other equipment, of more long-lasting materials and making them repairable instead of simply disposable, did foster an atmosphere of curiosity and innovation that doesn't exist as much in today's society. I also absolutely agree that in today's global society where we centralize the manufacture of electronics, equipment, etc. to one or two places, that we make sure that we retain the ability to make those things locally as well. We need to make sure that we have the capability of manufacturing critical equipment and supplies in the case of disaster or war.

In summary (or TL;DR for you youngsters): Remember the past, look to the future and hang on to quality, from any era.



Coma
Thanks Steve
Premium
join:2001-12-30
NirvanaLand

said by Nick_L:

Remember the past, look to the future and hang on to quality


. . . or to put it another way . . . you get what you pay for !

--
August is National Eye Exam Month


Lurch77
Premium
join:2001-11-22
Oconto, WI
kudos:4

1 recommendation

reply to Coma

said by Coma:


But I always wondered what the tire was for ?

In my picture? That's the spare tire mounted to my trailer tongue.


caffeinator
Coming soon to a cup near you..
Premium
join:2005-01-16
WA, USA
kudos:4
reply to drjim

said by drjim:

Boy, you sure have that right!
I'm an Engineer, but I'm a hands-on guy. The young guys I work with don't know which end of a soldering iron to pick up, or how to hold a screwdriver so if it slips you won't jab yourself in the hand!

I hear ya. I fixed my broken Ovale V8 e-cig device this morning. The bloody tiny paper-thin wires to the battery compartment (on a 2.5amp device no less!) had just snapped off from the solder joints on the IC board. Fortunately, Wal-Mart still carries solder...at 3AM.

I hadn't picked up an iron since the 1980's, but it is like riding a bike, eh?

Instead of pitching a $30 device, I simply fixed it. But, I reckon that buying a $2 tube of solder and repairing it is bad for Capitalism...I should have just bought a new one right?

:-\
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drjim
Premium,MVM
join:2000-06-13
Long Beach, CA
kudos:3

Don't know about being "good for capitalism", but at least you didn't send any more money to China.....
--
One man's Magic is another man's Engineering.



caffeinator
Coming soon to a cup near you..
Premium
join:2005-01-16
WA, USA
kudos:4

said by drjim:

Don't know about being "good for capitalism", but at least you didn't send any more money to China.....

That's a catch-22 sort of deal there, since I actually bought it from an excellent American vendor. Sure, he bought it from overseas, that's where they are made. But, I'm supporting him too.
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