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Dodge
Premium
join:2002-11-27

Furniture and a power outlet

I have a single power outlet in the bathroom that is now covered by a standing cabinet. Everytime I need to get to the outlet I need to move the cabinet and it's starting to get on my nerves:)

Is there a way to move the outlet onto the cabinet while still keeping it fairly detachable if I need to move the cabinet completely out of the way?


bolt
End of the line DSL sucks.
Premium
join:2003-11-11
Charlestown, IN
kudos:1
I use something like »www.lowes.com/pd_90581-16503-UTP···cetInfo= with a low profile plug behind some of our bigger pieces of furniture.

Dodge
Premium
join:2002-11-27
This would probaly work if it was 1) smaller and 2) this is going to be used about 3 feet from a bathroom sink, so I'll probably need some sort of GFI outlet.

Bob4
Account deleted

join:2012-07-22
New Jersey

1 recommendation

reply to Dodge
Cut a hole in the back of the cabinet so you can access the outlet.


alkizmo

join:2007-06-25
Pierrefonds, QC
kudos:1
reply to Dodge
There are plenty of choices for size and colors of powerstrips.
As for GFCI, just replace the outlet with a GFCI outlet. Anything connected to it will therefore be GFCI protected.


The Pig
I know you want to be me
Premium
join:2009-09-11
reply to Bob4
said by Bob4:

Cut a hole in the back of the cabinet so you can access the outlet.

And do not throw out the piece that was cut out just in case you need to fill the hole later on!


chamberc
Premium
join:2008-08-05
Irving, TX
reply to Dodge
said by Dodge:

This would probaly work if it was 1) smaller and 2) this is going to be used about 3 feet from a bathroom sink, so I'll probably need some sort of GFI outlet.

Avoid GFCI, as they're more trouble than they're worth...


fifty nine

join:2002-09-25
Sussex, NJ
kudos:2
said by chamberc:

said by Dodge:

This would probaly work if it was 1) smaller and 2) this is going to be used about 3 feet from a bathroom sink, so I'll probably need some sort of GFI outlet.

Avoid GFCI, as they're more trouble than they're worth...

What trouble are they? Mine only trip on an actual fault. The old ones I had were terrible but the new ones are just fine. They're no problem here, and I have what is considered a harsh environment for a GFCI (strong RF fields, specifically).


nunya
LXI 483
Premium,MVM
join:2000-12-23
O Fallon, MO
kudos:12
Reviews:
·Charter
·voip.ms
·surpasshosting

8 recommendations

reply to chamberc
Since we are giving out bad advice:

Seatbelts and airbags ore over rated too.

Sunscreen is for pussies.

Smoking never hurt anyone.

Just put some butter on that 3rd degree burn.

Kids should start drinking early to build up an alcohol tolerance.
--
If someone refers to herself / himself as a "guru", they probably aren't.


John Galt
Forward, March
Premium
join:2004-09-30
Happy Camp
kudos:8

1 recommendation

said by nunya:

Since we are giving out bad advice:

Smoking when dispensing gasoline is OK since it is not 'real fire'.

Wearing safety glasses just makes it harder to see.

Reaching under the wood to see if the saw blade is making it through the material is OK if you just barely touch the blade.

Austinloop

join:2001-08-19
Austin, TX
kudos:1
reply to chamberc
"Avoid GFCI" So is non permitted electrical work that doesn't meet code.

TheMG
Premium
join:2007-09-04
Canada
kudos:3
Reviews:
·NorthWest Tel
reply to fifty nine
said by fifty nine:

What trouble are they? Mine only trip on an actual fault.

Ditto. Never had a GFCI trip when it wasn't supposed to.


tvtek
Live life to its fullest
Premium
join:2004-03-07
Concord, CA
reply to chamberc
said by chamberc:

said by Dodge:

This would probaly work if it was 1) smaller and 2) this is going to be used about 3 feet from a bathroom sink, so I'll probably need some sort of GFI outlet.

Avoid GFCI, as they're more trouble than they're worth...

I guess so are circuit breakers and fuses


norbert26
Premium
join:2010-08-10
Warwick, RI
said by tvtek:

said by chamberc:

said by Dodge:

This would probaly work if it was 1) smaller and 2) this is going to be used about 3 feet from a bathroom sink, so I'll probably need some sort of GFI outlet.

Avoid GFCI, as they're more trouble than they're worth...

I guess so are circuit breakers and fuses

Transformers and meters are stupid too. Who needs that stupid nonsense. Just tap right into the top high voltage lines directly into your home.


Jack_in_VA
Premium
join:2007-11-26
North, VA
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Millenicom
reply to TheMG
said by TheMG:

said by fifty nine:

What trouble are they? Mine only trip on an actual fault.

Ditto. Never had a GFCI trip when it wasn't supposed to.

I've had them trip and not reset when they fail......Nothing to do with any connected equipment.


fenriswlf

join:2001-04-23
Joshua Tree, CA

1 edit
reply to Dodge
1. Buy a retro box at your local hardware store.
2. Trace the shape of the box with a pencil roughly where you want your outlet to come through.
3. Remove cabinet and cut out hole you traced with a router or jig-saw.
4. Screw retro box into the hole you made.
5. Turn off main power to home.
6. Remove the power outlet and disconnect the wires, pull wire into the new box reattach to outlet; screw that into your new box and replace the cover plate.
7. Turn power back on.
8. Reward yourself with a well deserved beer of your choice.

severach

join:2002-09-12
Jackson, MI
>5. Turn off main power to home.

That's a clever way to avoid a long explanation. I'd have said "Turn off power to your county" myself.

GFCI are a problem when extension outlets are wired inappropriately. Some feel that because the GFCI offers protected terminals for extension outlets that every possible outlet should be attached. Ever hear about hallway and closet outlets don't work and noone knows why. Isn't it nice when the exhaust fan blows the GFCI and the bathroom light goes out.


fifty nine

join:2002-09-25
Sussex, NJ
kudos:2
reply to Jack_in_VA
said by Jack_in_VA:

said by TheMG:

said by fifty nine:

What trouble are they? Mine only trip on an actual fault.

Ditto. Never had a GFCI trip when it wasn't supposed to.

I've had them trip and not reset when they fail......Nothing to do with any connected equipment.

If it fails then you need to clear the fault then replace it. If a fuse blows you don't put a bolt in its place just because the stupid fuse keeps blowing! My (late) grandfather almost burned his car down by using a piece of metallic wrapper from a box of cigarettes to replace a blown fuse.

I have several kilowatts ERP of RF less than 100ft from my house and not a single GFCI trips. The older ones did which is why they were replaced, but a few of the older ones failed anyway.

TheMG
Premium
join:2007-09-04
Canada
kudos:3
Reviews:
·NorthWest Tel
said by fifty nine:

If it fails then you need to clear the fault then replace it. If a fuse blows you don't put a bolt in its place just because the stupid fuse keeps blowing!

I think he's referring to the GFCI receptacle itself failing, which is definitely possible, although personally I haven't witnessed such a failure, but that doesn't mean they don't happen.

They do contain sensitive electronic components which can definitely fail, especially if subjected to transient surges and spikes. They typically contain MOV for protection of their own internal circuitry, but that is not infallible, especially in areas where lightning storms are frequent.


alkizmo

join:2007-06-25
Pierrefonds, QC
kudos:1
said by TheMG:

I think he's referring to the GFCI receptacle itself failing, which is definitely possible, although personally I haven't witnessed such a failure, but that doesn't mean they don't happen.

GFCIs have a test button for a reason: To test if they didn't fail yet.

So ya they WILL fail eventually. Everything fails in due time

Better they fail tripped than not.


Jack_in_VA
Premium
join:2007-11-26
North, VA
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Millenicom
reply to TheMG
said by TheMG:

I think he's referring to the GFCI receptacle itself failing, which is definitely possible, although personally I haven't witnessed such a failure, but that doesn't mean they don't happen.

They do contain sensitive electronic components which can definitely fail, especially if subjected to transient surges and spikes. They typically contain MOV for protection of their own internal circuitry, but that is not infallible, especially in areas where lightning storms are frequent.

Yes they do fail. Personally I've had three fail here. One outdoor receptacle and two in our bathroom. The bathroom is probably caused by the hairdryer and curling iron over time.


AVD
Respice, Adspice, Prospice
Premium
join:2003-02-06
Onion, NJ
kudos:1
reply to chamberc
said by chamberc:

said by Dodge:

This would probaly work if it was 1) smaller and 2) this is going to be used about 3 feet from a bathroom sink, so I'll probably need some sort of GFI outlet.

Avoid GFCI, as they're more trouble than they're worth...

in a bathroom?
--
--Standard disclaimers apply.--
The preceding posting is null and void in Arizona and any other jurisdiction where prohibited by law.


AVD
Respice, Adspice, Prospice
Premium
join:2003-02-06
Onion, NJ
kudos:1
reply to tvtek
said by tvtek:

I guess so are circuit breakers and fuses

THIS!!!! I hate when a breaker trips, especially when I lose all the work on my computer.
--
--Standard disclaimers apply.--
The preceding posting is null and void in Arizona and any other jurisdiction where prohibited by law.


AVD
Respice, Adspice, Prospice
Premium
join:2003-02-06
Onion, NJ
kudos:1
reply to fenriswlf
said by fenriswlf:

1. Buy a retro box at your local hardware store.
2. Trace the shape of the box with a pencil roughly where you want your outlet to come through.
3. Remove cabinet and cut out hole you traced with a router or jig-saw.
4. Screw retro box into the hole you made.
5. Turn off main power to home.
6. Remove the power outlet and disconnect the wires, pull wire into the new box reattach to outlet; screw that into your new box and replace the cover plate.
7. Turn power back on.
8. Reward yourself with a well deserved beer of your choice.

or just buy an extension cord.
--
--Standard disclaimers apply.--
The preceding posting is null and void in Arizona and any other jurisdiction where prohibited by law.


Jack_in_VA
Premium
join:2007-11-26
North, VA
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Millenicom
reply to AVD
said by AVD:

said by tvtek:

I guess so are circuit breakers and fuses

THIS!!!! I hate when a breaker trips, especially when I lose all the work on my computer.

What in the heck are you running on the circuit your computer is on? I've never had a breaker trip on anything since I moved in in 1989 especially the circuit my computer, printer and modem is on. Now power failures are quite another matter here.


alkizmo

join:2007-06-25
Pierrefonds, QC
kudos:1
said by Jack_in_VA:

What in the heck are you running on the circuit your computer is on? I've never had a breaker trip on anything since I moved in in 1989 especially the circuit my computer, printer and modem is on. Now power failures are quite another matter here.

Older houses tend to have the same circuits for several rooms.

For example, my fridge is on the same circuit as the living room and hallway. I'm going to fix that, but it was built that way.

But I can imagine someone with a window AC will have lots of problems on that circuit.


Jack_in_VA
Premium
join:2007-11-26
North, VA
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Millenicom
said by alkizmo:

Older houses tend to have the same circuits for several rooms.

Part of my house was built in 1954 and has the old wiring with no ground. Circuit testers says "Open Ground" I guess so. That's what my computer equipment is plugged into. Never been a problem. I have two bedrooms and this room with the original wiring.


alkizmo

join:2007-06-25
Pierrefonds, QC
kudos:1
said by Jack_in_VA:

Part of my house was built in 1954 and has the old wiring with no ground. Circuit testers says "Open Ground" I guess so. That's what my computer equipment is plugged into. Never been a problem. I have two bedrooms and this room with the original wiring.

What I was saying is that old houses have multiple rooms on single circuits so it's possible to have heavy loads on it.

His PC might be on the same circuit as the bathroom, and then someone goes to use a hairdryer and BAM, your breaker trips.
Or it could be shared with a kitchen receptacle on which the microwave is plugged and he can't change that setup.

In other words: It's a possibility, but if you don't have that problem and don't change what's plugged to which receptacle, you probably will NEVER have that problem.

As for your open ground, it is not going to make a circuit more likely to trip the breaker or fuse, but it is a safety hazard.


Jack_in_VA
Premium
join:2007-11-26
North, VA
kudos:1
We plug the vacuum cleaner in it with no adverse problems with the computer. Otherwise it's just the computer equipment and one desk lamp.


alkizmo

join:2007-06-25
Pierrefonds, QC
kudos:1
said by Jack_in_VA:

We plug the vacuum cleaner in it with no adverse problems with the computer. Otherwise it's just the computer equipment and one desk lamp.

Vacuums tend to be around 10A-12A
The PC, monitor and lamp can use maybe 2A-3A.
So you're obviously fine. Even 1A-2A over the limit and your breaker won't trip for 5-10 minutes (Time that your finish vacuuming in that room).

AVD's circuit gets overloaded. He might be running a window AC on that circuit and when he plugs in the vacuum, that sends it way over 15A.

ANYWAY, why don't we let AVD explain what's his situation?