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teddystacker

join:2001-12-08
Philadelphia, PA
Reviews:
·Comcast

1 recommendation

reply to whfsdude

Re: [BW Meter] New Limit on BW Meter?

@whfsdude

I am sure you are correct , the days of the much maligned "Bandwidth hogs" are gone , as Comcast have made their network more able to cope with the "heavy user" , even at peak I get the full 50mbit downstream , in the "old days" of a few years this would have never been possible.

My guess with the suspension of the 250 limit is that Comcast have intentionally "opened the flood gates" for a while , to see what the load is on the network when people are allowed to do what they like - that way they can work out the best business model to make the max amount of money from those of us who some people call "Bandwidth hogs" - I call us "value for your money in a poor economy" customers , but as we know this point had been debated for many , many years in these forums. things have moved on a great deal in the last few years and now its very , very easy to do 500gig a month without evening thinking about anything illegal...


telcodad
Premium
join:2011-09-16
Lincroft, NJ
kudos:15
Looks like the FCC is now looking into this "much higher data speeds now being offered vs. only slightly higher data caps/allowances being set" issue:

FCC to study data caps, and may raise broadband speed threshold
By Steve Donohue, FierceCable - August 22, 2012
»www.fiercecable.com/story/fcc-st···12-08-22

As the article says, one of the things the FCC is asking:
"What data capacity limits do most fixed broadband providers offer today? How often, and under what circumstances, do consumers exceed these limits?"

Link to the FCC notice of inquiry: »transition.fcc.gov/Daily_Release···91A1.pdf


Alcohol
Premium
join:2003-05-26
Climax, MI
kudos:4
reply to whfsdude
said by whfsdude:

I should mention the graph has not moved (I'm now at 1888GB) so it looks like it's not indicative of anything.

How much did you do last month? Did you go over that? The graph might be your last months usage.
I won't surpass last months usage for a few more days but that's my theory for now.
--
I found the key to success but somebody changed the lock.


Alcohol
Premium
join:2003-05-26
Climax, MI
kudos:4
reply to whfsdude
The bandwidth meter now seems to be completely gone. Anybody else?
--
I found the key to success but somebody changed the lock.


Bach
Premium
join:2002-02-16
Flint, MI
Gone here as well.

thatguyzp

join:2005-02-22
Smyrna, TN
reply to whfsdude
I'm in the Nashville test market for the new caps, with the new meter (as shown in my previous post on page one of this thread), and it's gone for me right now as well.

Hopefully Comcast came to their senses and did away with the new trial/cap thing (doubtful), probably just some temp outage.


Darknessfall
Premium
join:2012-08-17
kudos:6
reply to Alcohol
I just got my meter working after it wasn't working when we got hooked up a couple days ago :/ and now it's gone again lol.

mfmruizv

join:2001-09-01
USA
reply to whfsdude
my graph is gone now also, if its going to be some pay for ovg cap like that then maybe i should take advantage of the unlimited bandwith right now


TriForce

join:2008-05-27
Chico, CA

1 recommendation

reply to whfsdude
Meter disappears to reset at the end of the month. It will be back.


Alcohol
Premium
join:2003-05-26
Climax, MI
kudos:4
Yep.. It's back.


28619103
Premium
join:2009-03-01
21435
reply to whfsdude
Click for full size
»www.fcc.gov/measuring-broadband-···#chart19

Description: Cumulative distribution function of user traffic, by technology.
Shows the percentage of consumers using an indicated amount of data or greater, expressed in gigabytes.

I thought this was an interesting graph from the FCC Measuring Broadband America. It shows the distribution of usage as a % of the user base. If I am reading this correctly it shows that the top end downloaders are around 120G / month range. Perhaps the extreme heavy users 300G->1T+ are VERY few (but on this site are VERY vocal)


tshirt
Premium
join:2004-07-11
Snohomish, WA
kudos:5
Reviews:
·Comcast

1 recommendation

I believe you are reading that correctly, and it certainly jibes with everything CC, most other providers, other studies, many pundits and analysts have been saying all along...That current usage above the 250 cap was rare and typical usage is quite a bit less, AND for all we hear about it here (apocryphal or not ) terabyte+ users are a relative handful nationwide for most ISP's (certainly on residental accounts) and arent a market to pander to/ tailor services for/ or subsidize.


MSauk
MSauk
Premium
join:2002-01-17
Sandy, UT
So the question should be asked, if usuage is as low as they say, why the need for a cap? If less than 1% of users are using more than 250GB why is there a need for a cap?
--
801 Images


tshirt
Premium
join:2004-07-11
Snohomish, WA
kudos:5
Reviews:
·Comcast
Because that 1% is more expensive to build for, and they don't want to see it be 2%, 3%, 4%... without funding to stay ahead of the curve so first tier gets X GB/for $50 @XX/x speed. and can purchase more capacity as needed (extra large family, or similar MIGHT need adtional bandwidth for their particular needs.
That way lower end users aren't paying for/being priced out of the service by the demands of a very few. and those few can buy what they need.


28619103
Premium
join:2009-03-01
21435
reply to MSauk
said by MSauk:

So the question should be asked, if usuage is as low as they say, why the need for a cap? If less than 1% of users are using more than 250GB why is there a need for a cap?

Why shouldn't the 1% pay more if they use more than the 99%?

Oedipus

join:2005-05-09
kudos:1
Use more what?


MSauk
MSauk
Premium
join:2002-01-17
Sandy, UT
Reviews:
·Comcast
reply to 28619103
Because they are not harming the pipe. That is the whole point. They just use more, while others use way less. Why should they pay more to use? Guess I don't understand why they should have to pay more.

If you are going to do it that way than it should be like a utility. But the meter they use has to actually work properly and be regulated.
--
801 Images


MSauk
MSauk
Premium
join:2002-01-17
Sandy, UT
Reviews:
·Comcast
reply to tshirt
said by tshirt:

Because that 1% is more expensive to build for, and they don't want to see it be 2%, 3%, 4%... without funding to stay ahead of the curve so first tier gets X GB/for $50 @XX/x speed. and can purchase more capacity as needed (extra large family, or similar MIGHT need adtional bandwidth for their particular needs.
That way lower end users aren't paying for/being priced out of the service by the demands of a very few. and those few can buy what they need.

Why are they more expensive to build for? They are using the same speed as we are, they just happen to use more of it during a month. Why should we charge them more?
--
801 Images


28619103
Premium
join:2009-03-01
21435

1 edit

1 recommendation

said by MSauk:

Why are they more expensive to build for? They are using the same speed as we are, they just happen to use more of it during a month. Why should we charge them more?

It has to do with statistical multiplexing. A TB user is constantly contending for the resources available during peak time. This triggers a need for capacity augmentation more than other users. More contention = more capacity requirements = more cost.


FarmerBob

join:2000-12-21
Littleton, CO
Reviews:
·Comcast
·CenturyLink
·EarthLink
·ViaTalk
reply to whfsdude
This might explain it: »customer.comcast.com/help-and-su···ive-use/

Check the links below the explanation that the link above takes you to:
# Why are you making this change?
# What are the different plans you will be launching?
# Where will these plans be launched?
# Does this mean you're going to stop cutting people off who exceed your allowance?
# You previously said you needed the allowance to manage your network capacity, so how can you suspend it?
# How are you managing your network?
# Will you continue to offer access to the data usage meter?
# What is the average usage of people on your network today?

boontonflyer

join:2004-07-05
Ringoes, NJ
Reviews:
·Comcast
reply to whfsdude
FYI
We're located in Central New Jersey. Looked up "My Current Data Usage" . It shows the data for the prior three months which is ~~ 170 GB/mo. (~~ 130 GB/down and 40 GB/up). This data essentially agrees with the data collected in the "Traffic Meter of the SamKnows/FCC Router for monitoring the ISP's delivery of services ".

Paul


whfsdude
Premium
join:2003-04-05
Washington, DC
Reviews:
·Comcast

1 edit
reply to MSauk
said by MSauk:

Because they are not harming the pipe. That is the whole point. They just use more, while others use way less. Why should they pay more to use? Guess I don't understand why they should have to pay more.

You've falsely made the assumption that bandwidth usage equals costs. A consumer doing 250 gigs during peak hours vs. a user using 2 terabytes during off-peak hours. The user doing 250 gigs is going to consume the most resources [edit/correction: fixed wording].

Network engineers (hopefully) design networks to handle the peak traffic load which says nothing about the amount transfer, but rather transfer w/time period.


28619103
Premium
join:2009-03-01
21435

4 edits

said by whfsdude See Profile
You've falsely made the assumption that bandwidth usage equals costs. A consumer doing 250 gigs during peak hours vs. a user using 2 terabytes during off-peak hours. The user doing 250 gigs is going to consume the most bandwidth.

Network engineers (hopefully) design networks to handle the peak traffic load which says nothing about the amount transfer, but rather transfer w/time period.

While this is a good academic analysis for discussion, the reality is the 2TB users ARE using their connection during peak time FAR MORE than any other user.

Even if one did configure their download/upload system to use only off-peak utilization, the complexity and cost to build a billing system around this for the extreme minority of users that would use it and then try to explain how it works to the rest is not smart business.

ExoticFish

join:2008-08-31
Stuarts Draft, VA
reply to whfsdude
said by whfsdude See Profile
You've falsely made the assumption that bandwidth usage equals costs. A consumer doing 250 gigs during peak hours vs. a user using 2 terabytes during off-peak hours. The user doing 250 gigs is going to consume the most bandwidth.
[/BQUOTE :

Bandwidth, no... Resources, maybe.
--
»www.VAJeeps.com



whfsdude
Premium
join:2003-04-05
Washington, DC
said by ExoticFish:

Bandwidth, no... Resources, maybe.

Derp on my part. Thanks for the correction.


tshirt
Premium
join:2004-07-11
Snohomish, WA
kudos:5
Reviews:
·Comcast
reply to MSauk
said by MSauk:

If you are going to do it that way than it should be like a utility. But the meter they use has to actually work properly and be regulated.

But currently they don't have regulated utility status, so like any other business "No Shirt, No shoes, No Service" they can REFUSE service to anyone they please (based on franchise terms) if they see that customers actions to be detremental to their business, or disruptive to their network.
even with the cap "suspended" they still say

Does this mean you're going to stop cutting people off who exceed your allowance?

On May 17, 2012, we announced the suspension of our 250 GB usage allowance and that we would launch new data usage plans. We will continue to contact the very small number of excessive users about their usage, which can be indicative of security or related issues.
It can also mean they are just using too much, and costing more than they pay i.e. an undesirable customer.



telcodad
Premium
join:2011-09-16
Lincroft, NJ
kudos:15

1 edit
reply to telcodad
said by telcodad:

Looks like the FCC is now looking into this "much higher data speeds now being offered vs. only slightly higher data caps/allowances being set" issue:

FCC to study data caps, and may raise broadband speed threshold
By Steve Donohue, FierceCable - August 22, 2012
»www.fiercecable.com/story/fcc-st···12-08-22

As the article says, one of the things the FCC is asking:
"What data capacity limits do most fixed broadband providers offer today? How often, and under what circumstances, do consumers exceed these limits?"

Link to the FCC notice of inquiry: »transition.fcc.gov/Daily_Release···91A1.pdf

An article on the Broadcasting & Cable site today:

Genachowski: Consumers Need Sufficient 'Monthly' Broadband Capacity
Signals FCC has its eye on impact of usage-based pricing on broadband ecosystem

By John Eggerton, Broadcasting & Cable - September 25, 2012
»www.broadcastingcable.com/articl···city.php

EDIT: The full text of Genachowski's remarks can be seen here: »www.fcc.gov/document/chairman-ge···ox-media


telcodad
Premium
join:2011-09-16
Lincroft, NJ
kudos:15
A pair of articles on the GigaOM site today about ISP caps:

As broadband caps turn 4, it’s time for the FCC to take action
By Stacey Higginbotham, GigaOM - October 1, 2012
»gigaom.com/2012/10/01/data-caps-fcc/

and:

Which ISPs are capping your broadband, and why?
By Stacey Higginbotham, GigaOM - October 1, 2012
»gigaom.com/2012/10/01/data-caps-chart/


telcodad
Premium
join:2011-09-16
Lincroft, NJ
kudos:15
FCC commissioner Ajit Pai has warned that they could attempt to regulate the pricing of usage-based broadband packages next year if its net neutrality rules are upheld by an appellate court:

FCC could attempt to regulate usage-based broadband pricing, commissioner Pai warns
By Steve Donohue, FierceCable - December 7, 2012
»www.fiercecable.com/story/fcc-co···12-12-07


telcodad
Premium
join:2011-09-16
Lincroft, NJ
kudos:15
An article on the Multichannel News site today:

NCTA Funds Study Claiming Usage-Based Broadband Pricing Is Pro-Consumer
Free Press Disputes Findings of Paper Authored by Michigan State Professors

By Todd Spangler, Multichannel News - December 14, 2012
»www.multichannel.com/cable-opera···r/140728