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elitefx

join:2011-02-14
London, ON
kudos:2

1 edit
reply to yyzlhr

Re: Rogers Smart Home Monitoring: Who's Watching The Fox?

said by yyzlhr :

Secondly, do you think its fun to live your life constantly worried about being hacked.

I don't worry about sweet dick all bud. This thread is simply a topic to discuss. It's not about me. It's about Rogers Home Monitoring.

Personal attacks are not necessary. If you don't have something intelligent to say then you know what you can do......


yyzlhr

@rogers.com
That was not a personal attack at all. I'm trying to understand the point you're trying to get across. You start a thread essentially attacking the credibility of the Rogers home monitoring product but yet you have no substantive evidence to back it up. You bring up the remote possibility of the system being hijacked by Wifi, I think its fair to ask whether you feel the same way about other devices that have Wifi capabilities and aren't certified to the same standard that the Rogers Home monitoring product is...


elitefx

join:2011-02-14
London, ON
kudos:2
said by yyzlhr :

I think its fair to ask whether you feel the same way about...

Well, there's 2 sides to every story. I've heard Rogers position 1000 times over on their TV ads. So I thought I'd write the post from the opposing point of view......


elwoodblues
Elwood Blues
Premium
join:2006-08-30
Somewhere in
kudos:2
reply to yyzlhr
Rogers BS, they simply want a background check on their employees, it's not a legal requirement for a call centre.

Rogers_Chris
VIP

join:2010-12-15
Toronto, ON
reply to elitefx
Hi folks, Chris from the Rogers social media team here. First off, thanks to all who have jumped in on this discussion with your opinions and experiences with our service. I thought it would be worthwhile to try to address some of the questions raised here by elitefx because they're valid concerns possibly shared by others.

Internet security has been an integral part of the development of Smart Home Monitoring and we are constantly testing our system to protect customers and their system information. We take home security and monitoring seriously, and therefore Rogers Smart Home Monitoring is a professionally installed and fully managed service that is frequently updated, and uses advanced security practices.

Some of our general practices for security specifications and techniques include:

o Rogers Smart Home Monitoring uses a dedicated secure router for camera access, and a WPA2 encryption; one of the highest levels of encryption available

o The only place to access images and videos is on the secure Rogers Smart Home Monitoring portal. All images and videos stored by customers are encrypted down to a physical server disk level, meaning images are only accessible by the authorized customer through their secure username and password

o Rogers also uses advanced techniques that dynamically randomize access control to images and videos accessible on the Rogers Smart Home Monitoring web portal.

We have a dedicated group of experts at Rogers focused on Smart Home Monitoring. Their role is to monitor network connectivity on cable and wireless networks, ensuring consumer’s systems are always up and running.

Additionally, our Central Monitoring Station is staffed with certified security experts with over twenty years of professional experience who monitor and respond to emergency events in customer homes

Home owner liability is not something Rogers Smart Home Monitoring has ownership of.

I hope this helps!


elitefx

join:2011-02-14
London, ON
kudos:2
said by Rogers_Chris:

I hope this helps!

Just want to say Thanks Rogers_Chris for a clear, concise, informative reply to this thread. Personally, I couldn't ask for more than that......


Tx
bronx cheers from cheap seats
Premium
join:2008-11-19
Mississauga, ON
kudos:12
Reviews:
·TekSavvy DSL
·FreePhoneLine
·Rogers Hi-Speed
reply to yyzlhr
said by yyzlhr :

said by elitefx:

Okay. So you've installed Rogers Home Monitoring. Now, you're sitting in a public WiFi hotspot downtown and you decide to check on your house. What's to prevent the guy across the room from piggybacking/hacking into your iPad wifi to gain access through your Rogers installed secured Gateway, and robbing you blind at a later date by checking to see if your house is unoccupied (1 possible scenario of many)?

IMHO A lot of folks won't take the time (too busy) to secure their current public network access location.
Every wireless device accessing your Rogers Home Monitoring is a potential threat to your security. It's common sense.

Lol if you think any security system will actually protect your belongings then you're simply naive. Home security systems are only there to give you the sensation of feeling safer. If people want to break into your home they'll do it. Regardless of what security system you have, a burglar can simply break in and trip the alarm and steal your stuff and leave, and the police probably still won't arrive for another 15 minutes. Whether it can be hacked by wifi or whatever is irrelevant. If a burglar wants to get in they will find their way in whether you have a monitoring system or not.

Secondly, do you think its fun to live your life constantly worried about being hacked. Should I not use my wifi enabled laptop that has a camera in case someone hijacks my network and starts spying on me? Should we all do the same with our tablets and smartphoned that all have the same features?

Some of the things i'm reading in this thread are just insanely naive. Attacking a system most have yet to even see or try. Rogers has it's issues, but this system is actually very well done. People hate a company so much they are too naive to know what they are even talking about. I used to work for ADT for 6 years. CMC was run by SEVERAL "kids" that were all through the criminal checks.

I started with ADT knocking door to door, not my finest job at that time and moved up to an installer and moved up to management. I still have some old ADT contracts locking people in for 6 years laying around somewhere. You should read the terms on these contracts.
Though i worked for ADT for quite some time I decided to install the Rogers Home Monitoring.

I have a camera at each entrance and set rules. May not help if they are covering their face but it's better then a average response time of 15-25 minutes from police. Alarm trips are the lowest priority for the police.

Rogers Home Monitoring i'd dare anyone to try and hack. It's not a local IP that you use to access. My system plays the same purpose as my car alarm, a deterrent is it's purpose. It is the purpose of any alarm for anything you install one in.

Working for ADT, trying AlarmForce for 2 years, having a Brinks system in my house when i moved in and now using Rogers. Each are very much the same. If you think ADT is a quality system i encourage you to try it because i replaced more faulty door/window sensors then you can shake a stick at. Why you ask? Because ADT one year wanted to cheap out on an older model door/window sensor and went with cheaper parts. Customers didn't know the difference.


elwoodblues
Elwood Blues
Premium
join:2006-08-30
Somewhere in
kudos:2
reply to Rogers_Chris
I was waiting for the social marketing troll to show up, took longer then expected!
Expand your moderator at work

Viper359
Premium
join:2006-09-17
Scarborough, ON
Reviews:
·voip.ms
reply to elitefx

Re: Rogers Smart Home Monitoring: Who's Watching The Fox?

Ok, lets clear up a few things on this background check garbage. Some are making sound like a serious police background check is being conducted.

There is NO law requiring a call centre monkey to have a background check by the police. Its the silliest thing I have ever heard. The reference to the elderly and vulnerable is a joke. Its meant for people who work closely and intimately with them, not some guy hawking a cell phone.

A background check at Rogers will be the same as any other company. Telephone references, previous employers etc.

A company CANNOT use a credit record for purposes of possible employment. It's against the law. No different than insurance companies can use it to deny you coverage.

Some companies ask for a Police clearance letter. That is nothing more than a document stating you have no charges before the courts, and have no convictions of certain offences. The exact ones, I cannot remember, but there are many. It is usually done by the police service in the area you live.

Security Guards, Private Investigators, and other licensed professionals do undergo a RCMP background check. This is nothing more than a CPIC check to verify who you are, and that you have no charges against you, or convictions for which you have not received a pardon.

There are some professions where a credit check and CPIC check are conducted. Like bonded carriers, armed cash guards, certain Government employee's. The only time you really undergo a real background check is if you work for a police service as a cop or civilian member, higher ranking Government positions, or work at high threat risk institutions. Airports, DND, Energy sector, etc.

It can get a little more deeper, but, you get the point. No one at Rogers is undergoing some deep background check. I don't care what some guy on the telephone from HR told you.


nekkidtruth
YISMM
Premium
join:2002-05-20
London, ON
kudos:2
Reviews:
·WIND Mobile
·Rogers Hi-Speed
Sorry but, you are incorrect. It is absolutely legal for them to do a credit check and base their decision on this as to whether you are to be employed. There are many many call centers that deal with financial services that require it. It is not against the law.

The only one I'm unsure of is the criminal background check. I do know call centers that do this, whether it's legal or not is another story.
--
Weeeeeee


yyzlhr

@rogers.com
reply to Viper359
said by Viper359:

A background check at Rogers will be the same as any other company. Telephone references, previous employers etc.

...

It can get a little more deeper, but, you get the point. No one at Rogers is undergoing some deep background check. I don't care what some guy on the telephone from HR told you.

I don't know what you consider deep, but frontline employees that have been hired within the past year and half go through much more screening then telephone references from past employers. For retail, potential candidates now must visit a post office and present identification and have their ID verify and sign a consent form allowing Rogers to conduct a criminal background check. Once this is completed, the information is forwarded to a company called BackCheck which conducts a criminal background check. BackCheck will then tell Rogers whether the candidate has a clean record or not. If the record is not clean, the hiring manager will not know what the offence is but will not be able to move on with the hiring process.

This process is mandatory for all new hires, and HR will not generate employee numbers if the process is not followed. Obviously there is no legislation that outright states that it is a legal requirement for frontline telco employees to go through a background check. Whether it is required by law, most of us are not qualified to answer that question. This process was not mandatory in the past, but was suddenly required by Rogers corporate HR when Ontario introduced legislation to ensure the service sector was more accessible to those with disabilities. I doubt the legislation states that all frontline employees must pass a criminal background check but i'm sure there is other wording that would imply something similar.


rogersmogers

@start.ca
reply to elitefx
Credit checks are used all the time for employment. Ask anyone who works for a bank or credit card company.

Viper359
Premium
join:2006-09-17
Scarborough, ON
reply to nekkidtruth
Sorry, you are right! I was thinking of something else.

Viper359
Premium
join:2006-09-17
Scarborough, ON
Reviews:
·voip.ms
reply to yyzlhr
Having just finished training my last class with the new Ontario legislation that went into law dealing with the Ontario Accessibility Act, in retail and hotels, (As I am sure everyone out there had to) there is NO law on the books that requires a background check that I can find anywhere. Just mandatory training and clearly making sure its accessible and you bend over backwards.

BackCheck, ahhh. The one that has on a few times reported people not eligible for hire due to a criminal background they actually didn't have. Tried to find the links.
Again, a CPIC check is not some uber super computer. Its a DOS looking text format thing that goes ***bing*** on a hit. Its older than I am I think. Think telephone book entry with a list of what you have been convicted of. There are also many levels to CPIC, and the most detailed, only members of a police service can access. The star has a great article describing CPIC. »www.thestar.com/specialsections/···ic-works
Don't fool yourself. Its a basic name check. If the person has lied about their information, even in the smallest way, the results of the check would be skewed. Only a certified check can confirm, and that involves fingerprints via AFIS through one of a few companies out there.

Even how they do these checks in this company has raised the eyes of some from my understanding. This company doesn't have any formal access to CPIC, as I understand it, but that's a whole other topic.

Honestly, I can understand why Rogers might want their retail people to have a police clearance check, which is all that is being done, due to the high internal theft going on. Telephone operators do not. However, if Rogers wants to pay to screen all employee's like this, go nuts.

A somewhat deep background check to me is running my fingerprints through both AFIS in Canada and IAFIS in the US, accessing local police and provincial contact databases for every place I have lived for the last 10 years, CPIC check, credit checks, MTO pull, and a few other ones.

Please note, I was WRONG on the credit record, I had attributed to something else in my brain. An employer can demand one for pre employment, but after your hired, its apparently debateable. ---How is beyond me, if you said OK, I didn't think you could take it back.


mozerd
Light Will Pierce The Darkness
Premium,MVM
join:2004-04-23
Nepean, ON
reply to elitefx
said by elitefx:

Okay. So you've installed Rogers Home Monitoring. Now, you're sitting in a public WiFi hotspot downtown and you decide to check on your house. What's to prevent the guy across the room from piggybacking/hacking into your iPad wifi to gain access through your Rogers installed secured Gateway, and robbing you blind at a later date by checking to see if your house is unoccupied (1 possible scenario of many)?

IMHO A lot of folks won't take the time (too busy) to secure their current public network access location.
Every wireless device accessing your Rogers Home Monitoring is a potential threat to your security. It's common sense.

Very True. The rule to follow is to NOT use Public Wifi on the iPad, iPhone or iPod or any Android device to check your house.

If you are using a modern Laptop running Windows 7 or Windows Vista and Your Windows Firewall has not been turned OFF You can be protected while in a Public Wifi area by choosing a network location called Choose Public network for networks in public places (such as coffee shops or airports). This location is designed to keep your computer from being visible to other computers around you and to help protect your computer from any malicious software from the Internet. HomeGroup is not available on public networks, and network discovery is turned off. You should also choose this option if you're connected directly to the Internet without using a router, or if you have a mobile broadband connection.
--
David Mozer
IT-Expert on Call
Information Technology for Home and Business

yyzlhr

join:2012-09-03
Scarborough, ON
kudos:4
reply to Viper359
said by Viper359:

Honestly, I can understand why Rogers might want their retail people to have a police clearance check, which is all that is being done, due to the high internal theft going on. Telephone operators do not. However, if Rogers wants to pay to screen all employee's like this, go nuts.

A somewhat deep background check to me is running my fingerprints through both AFIS in Canada and IAFIS in the US, accessing local police and provincial contact databases for every place I have lived for the last 10 years, CPIC check, credit checks, MTO pull, and a few other ones.

Please note, I was WRONG on the credit record, I had attributed to something else in my brain. An employer can demand one for pre employment, but after your hired, its apparently debateable.

Obviously Rogers isn't taking fingerprints and running them through various police databases. It seemed like some feel like Rogers will hire someone straight out of prison without checking My point is that Rogers does more thorough screening then simple telephone references that are often fake anyways. The process extends to call centre reps as well as they have access to much more personal information then retail reps and most internal fraud is usually done in cahoots with those at the call centre.