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Dan2112

join:2001-08-24
San Jose, CA

[IPv6] Time for IPv6?

Looking for some feedback about IPV6.

I am currently provisioned at the "grandfathered" Blast speed tier 30/8 (22.5/5).

I own a Motorola 6120 and rent the EMTA modem for voice. I like having separate devices for data and voice.

My current router is a Buffalo WHR-HP-G300N with DD-WRT v24-sp2 (08/07/10) std - build 14896. This router does not support IPv6 as far as I know.

Everything on my connection is working great. Good signals, good speeds, reliable phone.

If I make the switch to IPV6 I was considering upgrading my data modem to either the Motorola 6141 or an Arris. I figure more downstream/upstream channels will be needed if we ever get higher speeds in the SF Bay Area and may help in other ways.

The router I am considering is the ASUS RT N66U, which I know just got new firmware to be IPv6 compatible with Comcast.

Is now a good time to upgrade my network to IPv6?

In order to replace the modem I think I just have to plug it in, but with being "dual" provisioned I want to check here first.

Dan



graysonf
Premium,MVM
join:1999-07-16
Fort Lauderdale, FL
kudos:1

1 recommendation

Unless you are trying to reach some of the IPv6 only sites, which are minuscule in number, then you don't have to have IPv6 now.

But it won't hurt anything to "upgrade" now either other than lighten your wallet some for new hardware.

You could also try playing with IPv6 now by finding IPv6 capable firmware for the router you already have.



NOCTech75
Premium
join:2009-06-29
Marietta, GA
reply to Dan2112

Everything is working fine... leave it alone.



anon 595148

@verizon.net
reply to graysonf

quote:
Unless you are trying to reach some of the IPv6 only sites, which are minuscule in number, then you don't have to have IPv6 now.

Last time I heard/read, it was less than 1 percent.

From source: »www22.verizon.com/Support/Reside···8742.htm

So nods in agreement with you.

quote:
You could also try playing with IPv6 now by finding IPv6 capable firmware for the router you already have.

What IPv6 capable firmware would run on the OP's router (Buffalo WHR-HP-G300N) ?

quote:
But it won't hurt anything to "upgrade" now either other than lighten your wallet some for new hardware.

By that you mean that IPv6 routers cost more than routers that do not support IPv6?

Thanks


graysonf
Premium,MVM
join:1999-07-16
Fort Lauderdale, FL
kudos:1

1 recommendation

I have no idea what IPv6 firmware is out there for that router. If it's a popular item there might be enough interest in updating DD-WRT for it, even if it has to be forked.

I don't think IPv6 routers necessarily have to cost more than IPv4 only routers.

What I meant was that if the OP is going to replace the router itself, he'll have to spend some money. If he also needs a new modem (which could be questionable) that's more money unless he is renting one from Comcast, in that case he can swap.


Dan2112

join:2001-08-24
San Jose, CA

1 edit

said by graysonf:

I have no idea what IPv6 firmware is out there for that router.

I am not aware of a port of DD-WRT for this router that includes IPv6. The newer versions of the Buffalo routers do.

I don't think IPv6 routers necessarily have to cost more than IPv4 only routers.

Everything else being equal I agree. The ASUS RT N66U has 802.c next gen wireless which I was thinking about for streaming HD to a projector in another room. VPN Termination is also a must for any router under consideration.

What I meant was that if the OP is going to replace the router itself, he'll have to spend some money. If he also needs a new modem (which could be questionable) that's more money unless he is renting one from Comcast, in that case he can swap.

I own the data modem 6120 as stated, but the only reason to move to a new modem would to be pick up more up/down channels which has been confirmed to have been rolled out to San Jose.


graysonf
Premium,MVM
join:1999-07-16
Fort Lauderdale, FL
kudos:1

Well, I joined the party here on Comcast only recently in June. I elected to buy a modem at Best Buy, the Zoom 5431J. At that time Comcast hadn't certified it a IPv6 ready even though it said so on the box. I questioned Comcast about that and within a week or two they updated their list of approved modems now showing this modem as IPv6 certified. It's an 8x4 channel unit capable of 343Mbps downstream. I'm done for now.

What I use here for a router will run anything for X86 that I can write to a CF card. I am currently using m0n0wall, but pfsense works as does GBWare OS. All of them are IPV6 capable. I know there is a DD-WRT build for PC that I could load onto it, but I don't know if it's IPv6 enabled or not. Undoubtedly there are others.


Dan2112

join:2001-08-24
San Jose, CA

said by graysonf:

I elected to buy a modem at Best Buy, the Zoom 5431J. It's an 8x4 channel unit capable of 343Mbps downstream. I'm done for now.

Yes that was another modem I was considering - just couldn't remember it when I posted.

Care to share what hardware you are running your router on. I had considered a "roll-your-own" router, but power/size was a concern. Didn't want a power sucking alien whirring away in my closet at night..


graysonf
Premium,MVM
join:1999-07-16
Fort Lauderdale, FL
kudos:1

My router is a GB-1000 originally sold by Global Technology Associates back in the early 2000s for huge dollars, over $3K. This included their firewall software and support was on an annual basis for more money.

These are X86 Intel Celeron 650-733MHz boards in a 19 inch rack mountable 1U case with internal power supply. There are four built in Intel 10/100 chipset NICs on the board. The two fans are fairly noisy so I replaced them with very low noise items. RAM is DDR type in three slots, up to 128MB per slot. All versions of these have a PCI expansion connector on the board, but it is enabled only in the later versions. Two of the ones I have came with a Phobus 10/100 four port NIC in that slot for a total of eight 10/100 NICs. Older versions of these ran the software out of a 16MB DOM module inserted into one of the IDE ports. Later versions came with a 16MB CF card mounted on an IDE to CF adapter above the mainboard supported on plastic standoffs. The final version has a CF card interface on the mainboard itself. I run my CF card on a IDE to CF adapter that mounts in the PCI slot on the back panel. This allows the card to be removed and replaced without opening the unit. These units run headless over the network and also have a serial port for console access to the software. There is no video, keyboard, or mouse support. There is a USB port and a parallel port but I don't think there is any access to these. The BIOS is not reachable either, or is but access is undocumented.

For wireless I just plug a WAP into my switch. I don't need that built into the router. I have tried a DLINK AirPlus Extreme G PCI wireless card in the PCI slot. It works fine but I'd rather have the exposed CF card there instead.

These can be found occasionally on ebay for 1% of their original cost or less. I got one of these for $0.99 plus $20.00 shipping. The most I ever paid for one was $35.00 shipped. There is one still available for $59 plus shipping, but I don't need any more of these and wouldn't pay that price - it has been falling for quite some time and will eventually get to the point where someone will scoop it up. It is the last version, a GB-1000R.

I can't find any decent pics of these online right now, but if you want to see one, let me know and I'll snap a few shots of one of my spares.

I run m0n0wall on these, but pfsense will also work as will Global Technology's freeware version of their code which is pretty nice too.