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kawa001

@verizon.net

Netflix Poor Video Quality- what to troubleshoot next?

Can anyone make some suggestions as to how to troubleshoot the consistently poor Netflix video quality (.56 Mbps) I receive? Here the facts:
- .56 Mbps is consistently what I receive my movies at according to Netflix.
- I have 25 Mbps Verizon FIOS up/down.
- The Netflix "manage video quality" setting is set to Best Quality
- The AT&T, Verizon, Speedtest.net & Vudu throughput tests all put my throughput at better than 20 Mbps.
- I copied and then downloaded a 1 GB file from my PC to an internet server several times and got better than 20 Mbps.
- I can watch Vudu HDX movies perfectly.
- It makes no difference whether it's my iPhone, desktop PC, laptop PC, or my Blu-ray player.
- It makes no difference whether I'm running wired LAN or wireless.
- I have cold rebooted all my devices many times over.
- Time of day doesn't matter.
- Verizon insists that they don't throttle Netflix streaming.
- Verizon replaced my Actiontec NI424-WR Rev D. router with a newer Rev I. router at my request in order to rule a bad router out. I'm using factory settings.
- Netflix says that they don't know what the problem is.
- Verizon says that they don't know what the problem is.


darcilicious
Cyber Librarian
Premium
join:2001-01-02
Forest Grove, OR
kudos:4
Reviews:
·Frontier FiOS
As a test, try changing the DNS on one device (PC or iPhone) to one of Google's or OpenDNS' addresses:

8.8.4.4
8.8.8.8
208.67.222.222
208.67.220.220

Sometimes the default DNS used by ISPs isn't the best when it comes to serving content via CDNs...
--
♬ Music is life ♬


IllIlIlllIll
EliteData
Premium
join:2003-07-06
Hampton Bays, NY
kudos:7
reply to kawa001
check the current version of Silverlight and see if there is an upgrade on the MS website.

BoulderHill1

join:2004-07-15
Montgomery, IL
Reviews:
·AT&T DSL Service
reply to kawa001
Let me ask,

What exactly is the poor video quality.

I am taking note of your reference to .56Mbps but what I am asking is what do you see on your screen?

What is the picture quality? What issues do you have? buffering?

What are you using to watch netflix? on a computer? ROKU? other streaming device?


kawa001

@verizon.net
reply to IllIlIlllIll
I also experience poor throughput on my Blu-ray player so Silverlight probably isn't the culprit. Recall that I said the I experience uniformly poor throughput across all my platforms. My version of Silverlight is 4.1.10329.0. I'm reluctant to upgrade Silverlight since previous upgrades (from a year or two ago) always broke Netflix on the PC for me.


kawa001

@verizon.net
reply to BoulderHill1
I experience frequent buffering and the inability to view movies in HD quality. Overall, the picture is pretty grainy on my bigger screens. Netflix states that I need 5 Mbps throughput for HD.
The devices I'm using to view Netflix are listed in the 7th bullet of my original post, i.e., " iPhone, desktop PC, laptop PC, or my Blu-ray player".

BoulderHill1

join:2004-07-15
Montgomery, IL
Reviews:
·AT&T DSL Service
Okay, yes I see that now. Various devices.

I am not inclined to think it is a silverlight issue. Too many platforms with the same issue.

It would seem to be a connection issue to me.

I am a bit puzzled as I'm sure you are. It seems you have a good connection otherwise.

Can you try another different router? Not one supplied by verizon?


darcilicious
Cyber Librarian
Premium
join:2001-01-02
Forest Grove, OR
kudos:4
I'd try those other DNS addresses long before trying to swap out the router (especially if you get TV via Verizon and not just internet).
--
♬ Music is life ♬


kawa001

@verizon.net
reply to darcilicious
said by darcilicious:

As a test, try changing the DNS on one device (PC or iPhone) to one of Google's or OpenDNS' addresses:

8.8.4.4
8.8.8.8
....

The DNS changes didn't make a difference but thank you for suggesting for me to rule this out. As I understand it DNS is just there to resolve a FQDN to an IP address. Once the TCP/IP connection is made between the Netflix content server and my device DNS ceases to be a player. Incidentally, I did some NSLOOKUPS using the Verizon DNS server and the response was virtually instantaneous even with some really obscure domain names.


darcilicious
Cyber Librarian
Premium
join:2001-01-02
Forest Grove, OR
kudos:4
Reviews:
·Frontier FiOS

2 edits

As I understand it DNS is just there to resolve a FQDN to an IP address.

Like I said, DNS is also used for CDNs to find the nearest server to provide the content; sometimes the ISP DNS doesn't do this well.

I take it you tried this on your PC?

--
♬ Music is life ♬


darcilicious
Cyber Librarian
Premium
join:2001-01-02
Forest Grove, OR
kudos:4
Reviews:
·Frontier FiOS

1 edit
reply to kawa001
The second post in this thread explains it quite well. If you only tried Google's (the first pair) try the second pair (OpenDNS's), etc.

EDIT, uh, here's the url »forums.roku.com/viewtopic.php?p=253201
--
♬ Music is life ♬


kawa001

@verizon.net
reply to BoulderHill1
said by BoulderHill1:

Can you try another different router? Not one supplied by verizon?

I thought it might be the router so I was able to persuade Verizon to send me a newer one (same model but different firmware). I'm getting 20+ Mbps throughput elsewhere on the internet and HDX quality from Vudo. It's only Netflix. The only thing left to do that I can think of is to connect my laptop to a friend's network who also has FIOS in my neighborhood and see what kind of quality I'm getting.

BoulderHill1

join:2004-07-15
Montgomery, IL
Reviews:
·AT&T DSL Service
It would be worth it to connect to another ISP and compare the results. Perhaps you have a friend that is on comcast or a DSL connection. or maybe a hotspot somewhere.

Maybe if the same hardware is used on another connection with a better result then you can could be certain that the problem is based on your connection.

If trying another ISP results in the same poor quality then it would have something to do with your devices and how you have them set up.


treetop1000

join:2003-11-07
Lexington, KY
reply to kawa001
If it's a flash based playback, make sure you check that you do not have more than one version of Flash operational.
I'm using Google's Chrome, and a month back it started incessant buffering and really jerky playback when in full-screen.
Seems someone else figured this out, and started telling everyone to check for extra versions of Flash.

I had three versions of Flash running and they are(were) interfering with each other. The only one that you should have is the one that resides in the win32 directory. On Chrome, look at the plugins (enter Chrome-plugins in the search bar and see if you have more than one) and disable all the older versions except the win32 install (it IDs each version and where it is)


kawa001

@verizon.net
said by treetop1000:

If it's a flash based playback, make sure you check that you do not have more than one version of Flash operational.
I'm using Google's Chrome, and a month back it started incessant buffering and really jerky playback when in full-screen.
Seems someone else figured this out, and started telling everyone to check for extra versions of Flash.

I had three versions of Flash running and they are(were) interfering with each other. The only one that you should have is the one that resides in the win32 directory. On Chrome, look at the plugins (enter Chrome-plugins in the search bar and see if you have more than one) and disable all the older versions except the win32 install (it IDs each version and where it is)

I also experience this on my Blu-ray player as well.

floydb1982

join:2004-08-25
Kent, WA
reply to kawa001
Blu-ray does upto 1080p 40Mbps, Broadcasting does upto 1080i 19.5Mbps, DVD does upto 480p/i 8Mbps to 10Mbps. Netflixs does HD 1080p at 4.8Mbps, SD 480p/i at 2.2Mbps. It's not going to look any better than it already does.


darcilicious
Cyber Librarian
Premium
join:2001-01-02
Forest Grove, OR
kudos:4
Reviews:
·Frontier FiOS
The problem that the OP has is nothing like what you've just posted about.

The OP is saying that he can't even get "HD 1080p at 4.8Mbps" from Netflix, that is, he said, "- .56 Mbps is consistently what I receive my movies at according to Netflix."

Best guess is that he has some kind of routing/CDN issue.
--
♬ Music is life ♬


88615298
Premium
join:2004-07-28
West Tenness
reply to floydb1982
said by floydb1982:

Blu-ray does upto 1080p 40Mbps, Broadcasting does upto 1080i 19.5Mbps, DVD does upto 480p/i 8Mbps to 10Mbps. Netflixs does HD 1080p at 4.8Mbps, SD 480p/i at 2.2Mbps. It's not going to look any better than it already does.

Actually Netflix HD streams are 5.3 Mbps.

floydb1982

join:2004-08-25
Kent, WA


88615298
Premium
join:2004-07-28
West Tenness

2 edits
"Best" - Best picture quality and highest date use per hour (generally about 1.0 GBytes/hour - or up to 2.3 GBytes/hour when streaming HD content.

2.3 GB per hour = 18.4 Gb per hour = 18842 Mb per hour = 19293798 kb per hour/3600 seconds in an hour = 5359 kbps.

4800 kbps would equal 2.06 GB per hour.


aurgathor

join:2002-12-01
Lynnwood, WA
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Frontier Communi..
reply to kawa001
a) post some screenshots -- I was getting worse video quality on Netflix streaming than on TVRips of the same movies acquired via BT
b) How big is your display?
b) Can you sniff the Ethernet traffic between your PC and router?
--
Wacky Races 2012!


wishera

join:2000-12-12
Everett, WA
reply to kawa001
definitely check on a different network. it sounds like your router has QOS on it that is automagically giving netflix lowest priority on your network. do you have other network apps running? can you access the router?
--
Douglas Adams: "Anyone who is capable of getting themselves made President should on no account be allowed to do the job."