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Ken
Premium,MVM
join:2003-06-16
Markle, IN

1 recommendation

reply to rbnice1

Re: New home build framing question.

said by rbnice1:

They told me the rim joist kerfs are normal they do it all the time.

I'm sure they do it all the time, but that doesn't change the fact it's just poor workmanship. If they let the lumber guy know not to send out junk wood like that they would have to come up with work arounds. It's really just laziness more than anything.

said by rbnice1:

As to the top plate lapping. They lapped all the outer walls and the wall that is normally the load bearing wall for that support. Looking at one of the other houses the wall that is running parallel to the steel beam is not under it. I am trying to get the blueprints to see why my wall is off. It is not just my wall that is off but 2 other houses as well.

Usually the builder will have a standard plan and then optional upgrades for it. Usually a common upgrade will be to move the back wall out 2' or something similar. Perhaps you and the other 2 houses either have the same upgrade over standard, or you have standard and all the others have the upgrade. Might not be the back wall either, a garden tub upgrade also will bump an interior wall over a bit.

kherr
Premium
join:2000-09-04
Collinsville, IL
Reviews:
·Charter

As far as sending junk wood, if you need enough of one size, they'll just send out an entire bundle right off of their rack and never pick out individual boards. Been there done that. It is then up to you to bad order individual boards. Usually you buy precuts by the bundle. When using the same size floor joists on a two story house(as it may be for this instance) they probably need enough to use an entire bundle.

As for as getting good individual boards, the only way to ensure good stock is to pick it out yourself. The yard has no time to hand pick 40 of one size., 20 of another, 30 of yet another .... and so on. They load many delivery trucks in a day. At best they'll throw aside the obvious ones. If they continue to send out junk, time to change your source.

I only know first hand where the builder was assured of good individual boards, he had controlling interest in the lumber yard .....



Coma
Thanks Steve
Premium
join:2001-12-30
NirvanaLand
reply to rbnice1

said by rbnice1:

I looked at a couple of the other houses that are that same floor plan as mine today and talked to the carpenters. They told me the rim joist kerfs are normal they do it all the time.


That statement suggests that this new house is in a new housing development, is that correct ?

If so, then that also suggests that the general contractor is more of a project manager for the development and defers to the sub contractors to use best practices. At this point the general contractor does not have daily site interaction (single lot) and the entire housing development becomes a tract housing project or "Builder Grade Housing" at best.

I'm just trying to sort through the facts.

--
September is National Blueberry Popsicle Month


rbnice1

join:2000-12-16
Fenton, MO
reply to Ken

Ahhh yes. The other house that the wall and beam are slightly different does have the back wall pushed out 4 foot in the living room area.(optional upgrade.)



rbnice1

join:2000-12-16
Fenton, MO
reply to Coma

Yes this is a house being built in a neighborhood by a builder. They are building 3 other homes right now in the neighborhood, and 1 other builder is building 2 other houses as well.



AVD
Respice, Adspice, Prospice
Premium
join:2003-02-06
Onion, NJ
kudos:1
reply to BrewBoy5

said by BrewBoy5:

I showed the pictures to my structural engineer today. Concerning the rim joist he said it is not an issue, as I said, it is a compression load and the majority of the weight is transferred to the joists anyway. As far as the top plates, he said it's up to the inspector to determine it a steel tie strap would be required, there is not enough information in the pictures make a judgement. By the way he is a licensed structural engineer in Oregon, Washington, Idaho and Colorado.

How about the steel beam bearing?
--
--Standard disclaimers apply.--

BrewBoy5

join:2002-04-28

How about the steel beam bearing?

The OP stated in an prior post that the contractor comes back at a later date and secures and grouts the beam. Standard procedure.



Msradell
P.E.
Premium
join:2008-12-25
Louisville, KY

said by BrewBoy5:

How about the steel beam bearing?

The OP stated in an prior post that the contractor comes back at a later date and secures and grouts the beam. Standard procedure.

True but the shims that are now in place are not adequate even if they are going to be grouted!


rbnice1

join:2000-12-16
Fenton, MO

They added shims so it should be fine now. Just a sham they didnt have it right to begin with.


robbin
Premium,MVM
join:2000-09-21
Leander, TX
kudos:1

New pic?



rbnice1

join:2000-12-16
Fenton, MO

So never got any pics of the shims but basically they doubled them up so the shims run the width of the opening so there is no chance of them slipping off like they were.

As far as updated they have it basically finished framing.











Will be going by tomorrow they actually have the rafters done and most the sheathing.



John Galt
Forward, March
Premium
join:2004-09-30
Happy Camp
kudos:8
reply to rbnice1

They're wrapping the house...did the inspector sign off on the nailing?



Ken
Premium,MVM
join:2003-06-16
Markle, IN

Probably not something that has to be inspected there, I know it isn't inspected here. We always put the housewrap on as we were building the walls.



John Galt
Forward, March
Premium
join:2004-09-30
Happy Camp
kudos:8

Just checking...!

They're rabid about it here. Better use galvanized nails, too. If you use regular GV nails, no go. And no 're-nailing' allowed. The usual remedy is to pull and replace the sheathing.

It's always good fun when valley contractors come over to the coast to build...they have no idea was is involved.


seederjed
Premium
join:2005-02-28
Norcross, GA
reply to John Galt

Usually the only nailing that is inspected is for shear panels on the corners.



koma3504
Advocate
Premium
join:2004-06-22
North Richland Hills, TX
reply to robbin

Holy cow that need to be fixed right. Other wise wait for problems with walls moving and cracks start showing up in the sheetrock later on down the line.



rbnice1

join:2000-12-16
Fenton, MO
reply to rbnice1

some new pics for this week.

roof almost done:






rbnice1

join:2000-12-16
Fenton, MO
reply to rbnice1

Front door we picked out:


roof finished:


They screwed up the shower already:


round_toit
Premium
join:2005-02-01
Pensacola, FL

1 edit

It "appears" that they did what typical framers always do. They rolled the wrap under the top headers on the windows. This is not the proper way, althought it has a long tradition. This method leaves a way for water to travel behind the window flange and into the interior. The wrap should at least be on the outside of the flange, so if water gets to the wrap it runs on the outside of the window. For the better way. »www.jlconline.com/Images/Flashin···3829.pdf

For folks who are REALLY interested, click on the link below and follow the instructions. I could not figure out how to just attach the video. Gary Katz is a master carpenter, prominent member of Journal of Light Construction and has his own website at »www.garymkatz.com/

»hurricaneconstruction.net/?q=node/58

Scroll down the page to
HOUSEWRAP FLASHING TECHNIQUES

and Click for video, installation begins about 4:30 into the total video.



Coma
Thanks Steve
Premium
join:2001-12-30
NirvanaLand

1 recommendation

reply to rbnice1


My father, who was a builder, once told me that a crappy built house will last almost as long as a well built house.

--
September is National Blueberry Popsicle Month



John Galt
Forward, March
Premium
join:2004-09-30
Happy Camp
kudos:8

said by Coma:


My father, who was a builder, once told me that a crappy built house will last almost as long as a well built house.

Unfortunately...


Coma
Thanks Steve
Premium
join:2001-12-30
NirvanaLand


I have lived in both and I admit that I own both.

--
September is National Blueberry Popsicle Month



AVD
Respice, Adspice, Prospice
Premium
join:2003-02-06
Onion, NJ
kudos:1
reply to Coma

said by Coma:


My father, who was a builder, once told me that a crappy built house will last almost as long as a well built house.

"almost"
--
--Standard disclaimers apply.--


Jack_in_VA
Premium
join:2007-11-26
North, VA
kudos:1

Homes built years ago are still standing and yet did not use the "improved" "enhanced" building methods of today that allows all homes on average today to only last about half as long as yesteryear. That is if you are lucky to get a better one.



AVD
Respice, Adspice, Prospice
Premium
join:2003-02-06
Onion, NJ
kudos:1

said by Jack_in_VA:

Homes built years ago are still standing and yet did not use the "improved" "enhanced" building methods of today that allows all homes on average today to only last about half as long as yesteryear. That is if you are lucky to get a better one.

they don't build them like they used to.
--
--Standard disclaimers apply.--


Jack_in_VA
Premium
join:2007-11-26
North, VA
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Millenicom

said by AVD:

they don't build them like they used to.

You have the answer. Inferior building materials and the lower quality of builders as compared to the highly skilled carpenters in the past. Only a very few now in the U.S. can compare.


Coma
Thanks Steve
Premium
join:2001-12-30
NirvanaLand
reply to AVD

said by AVD:

"almost"


Yep !

That's what he said.

--
September is National Blueberry Popsicle Month


Draiman
Let me see those devil horns in the sky

join:2012-06-01
Kill Devil Hills, NC
Reviews:
·Verizon FiOS
reply to rbnice1

After almost 2 years of watching current construction across the street I wish I would have bought a new house instead of a 1960 house. Today's high efficiency houses are pretty sweet.

My own garage addition happening now is built like a tank compared to the old construction. On the flip side the crappy 1960 foundation/structure made it over 50 years. Pretty impressive given today's construction.
--
IF YOU FIND ANY MISTAKES IN MY WORK...Please consider that they are there for a purpose. I try to please everyone and there is always someone looking for mistakes!



Jack_in_VA
Premium
join:2007-11-26
North, VA
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Millenicom

Any houses built from about 1960 on are garbage compared to those prior to that. Even though they were not as energy efficient as electricity, fuel oil and gas was a cheap commodity so it didn't matter then. The construction and materials were far superior to later construction.



alkizmo

join:2007-06-25
Pierrefonds, QC
kudos:1

said by Jack_in_VA:

Any houses built from about 1960 on are garbage compared to those prior to that. Even though they were not as energy efficient as electricity, fuel oil and gas was a cheap commodity so it didn't matter then. The construction and materials were far superior to later construction.

Faults from houses in those days are manageable. Over the years they needed to be renovated anyways, so chances to upgrade the insulation in the walls and the furnace equipment HAD to be changed anyway to today's 90%-95% efficiency.

In my 1964 house, I was able to "energy efficiently" put my attic insulation higher than code (I'm at R55) and basement (R27).

I was able to properly seal most of the duct work and also notice that is hasn't shown any signs of corrosion.

What you can't change during routine renovations are the "bones" of the house (Foundation, structural beams, brick siding, etc).

I love my 1964 house. I can see the bones of it while I'm redoing the basement and insulating my attic. They look just like new. In 46 years, the electrical panel still shows no sign of rust.

If in 46 years there has been no structural problems due to construction defects, then there will never be problems like that.