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aSic
application specific
Premium
join:2001-05-17
Wakulla, FL
Reviews:
·Comcast

[Rant] You dont have any what?

Cable. The came company sends out a contractor to do an installation.... without any cable.

*facepalm*

--
Background: Moved into a new place a year ago. Previous tenants had cable, but moved out and didnt pay their bill. It has taken the last 8 months of fighting with those idiots to get set up, as they insisted I pay the previous tenants bill, regardless of the name on my license, or the name on my lease.

Anyway, getting through all that crap, I set up an appointment, and inform the rep that the installer will have to run a new drop from the ped to the house, as the drop was buried very shallow across the dirt road, and the grader took it out.

Since this house previously had service, I would think they would have notes on how long the drop is, what cable used, and so forth. Nope. I had to show the guy the ped, and he measured it out by walking. Apparently the distance was beyond the limits of RG6, and required RG11. Reasonable....except he has no RG11 on board. He also had no idea it had to be buried....again, something that should've been in the service notes, from previous service as well as my conversation when setting up the appointment.

He calls in for help, another guy shows up with a ditch witch. He has RG11 on board, but nowhere near enough to do the job. Didnt the first installer tell the second how far the drop needs to run?

Two hours later, everybody ends up leaving with an order being placed for a "pre-bury", and I will need to schedule another installation appointment for a week after they get it buried. Well crap. Already waiting two weeks after fighting for 8 months...now get to add another two weeks to wait.

All in all, one would think a company would keep better records, pass along messages, and send installers with every tool that they could possibly need to complete an installation. Granted, they use external contractors to complete the job, but still.

I need to call the landlord about a new countertop after banging my head into it all afternoon. :|
--
Teamwork is a lot of people doing what I say.


graysonf
Premium,MVM
join:1999-07-16
Fort Lauderdale, FL
kudos:2
Reviews:
·Comcast



tshirt
Premium,MVM
join:2004-07-11
Snohomish, WA
kudos:5
Reviews:
·Comcast
reply to aSic
BEFORE the ditchwitch guy can legally start the machine you need EVERYTHING underground, on and off your property MARKED.
since you are going to all this trouble to get service YOU might want to hirer another company to bury a straight shot of oversized conduit for the cable contrator to pull through. it just eliminates one big step, and makes replacement easy (ier) then the grader comes through again


CableTool
Poorly Representing MYSELF.
Premium
join:2004-11-12

1 recommendation

reply to aSic
said by aSic:

Cable. The came company sends out a contractor to do an installation.... without any cable.

Since this house previously had service, I would think they would have notes on how long the drop is, what cable used, and so forth. Nope. I had to show the guy the ped, and he measured it out by walking. Apparently the distance was beyond the limits of RG6, and required RG11. Reasonable....except he has no RG11 on board. He also had no idea it had to be buried....again, something that should've been in the service notes, from previous service as well as my conversation when setting up the appointment.

To clarify-
Cable, nor Telco, nor power have records as in depth as you are stating. There is not a central database that says 123 main st has cable, it is an underground drop of 220' exiting out the rear to the NorthWest corner.

They have prints that say where the Hardline is ran. ( the line guys at least)
They have subscriber accounts stating if a house had service before or not.

Thats pretty much it. One would assume if a house previously had cable it would still have a drop but landlords and land owners pay little regard to existing lines and will usually cut them all out when a tenant leaves. House or Apt.

The tech didnt show up without cable, he showed up without the proper cable to run a long distance. Which, if he is arriving to a reconnect ( meaning previous service was installed there as you stated it was) he wouldnt need RG11 for a new service drop. Just RG6 for the inside wiring for AOs and a few jumpers. Just like every job he probably did that day.

Also as T-Shirt stated, if you are going to bury cable, you need the whole property marked out so as not to "ditch witch" the Gas line or Power or anything.
Reasonable enough I would think?

Two sides.
--
CableTechs.org/"Horrible People with Integrity"


aSic
application specific
Premium
join:2001-05-17
Wakulla, FL
Reviews:
·Comcast
Damn the forms handling in firefox. Had a rather long reply done up, which was followed by a submission error... boom gone.

Anyways, short version:
Whatever happened to being prepared to handle everything on your daily todo list?

Whatever happened to customer service that actually listened to customers instead of treating them like idiots?

Whatever happened to a company keeping accurate records of their products and equipment? (Why NOT have those in-depth records?)

How hard would it have been on the customer service associate who took my appointment to relay in the notes that a new buried drop would be required at this address like I freely shared with her?

How hard would it have been for the installer to see his list of reconnects/disconnects/new installs and realize that he is likely to need some "long distance cable" on his truck for today's run in a rural county? I mean, being a rural county, at least half of your work involves "long distance" runs from the highway.

How hard would it have been to actually notate what happens at installations? (On 7/12/2009, at 123 Main St J.Rogers installed a new aerial drop..used 450ft RG11 across three spans. PS: They have a dog that loves to bite.) Seeing a "new install" at a residence that previously had service, it isnt entirely unreasonable to expect a new drop. Again, being prepared? (edit: do installers simply not keep track of their inventory?)

I have been on both sides of the fence. This is still a fail squarely in the Comcast column.

@ tshirt See Profile, I agree, but doing locates on the property isnt required, as everything in the area is aerial except the CATV.
--
Teamwork is a lot of people doing what I say.


JigglyWiggly

join:2009-07-12
Pleasanton, CA
That sounds awful


DataRiker
Premium
join:2002-05-19
00000

2 edits

1 recommendation

reply to aSic
Most of the cable installers in this area don't even carry RG11.

The reason they don't have notes is because it would be a tremendous waste of time.

Cable is an easy system. You hook into a free tap on the pole ( or whatever you may have in your area ) and run it into the house.

If your situation happened often enough, there would be a system in place to deal with it.

Just curious, what was the drop length?


tshirt
Premium,MVM
join:2004-07-11
Snohomish, WA
kudos:5
Reviews:
·Comcast
reply to aSic
said by aSic:

@ tshirt See Profile, I agree, but doing locates on the property isnt required, as everything in the area is aerial except the CATV.

The locate is required even if there is nothing to find.
Over the years a lot of damage and injuries have happened because the homeowner was "SURE" that there was nothing RIGHT THERE or the water/gas/power/etc came from a different direction.

The contractor could lose their license for not doing the REQUIRED "call before you dig"

Of course we learned during the fios build out, Florida is very casual with ROW marking and complance issues which was why they ended up with so much damage, from shallow buries, not in ROW pipes and totally unmarked/registered utility paths.
BTW you're the one complaining about the failure to document, you have the chance to start NOW.


ptrowski
Got Helix?
Premium
join:2005-03-14
Putnam, CT
kudos:4
reply to aSic
said by aSic:

@ tshirt See Profile, I agree, but doing locates on the property isnt required, as everything in the area is aerial except the CATV.

Interesting, never heard of aerial sewer and water lines before....


TriForce

join:2008-05-27
Chico, CA
Reviews:
·Comcast
reply to aSic
No company has a playbook for every situation. Your situation is uncommon. Therefore they want to be cautious.

Customer service treats you like an idiot because people mostly are idiots and think they know better than their trained employees.

Granular notes like you insisted upon is a huge waste of time because it's useless information to go by. They don't know for sure they need the same amount as distances can change due to rewiring.

Again, customer service CANNOT take you at your word. Customers don't dictate what should be needed to do the job properly.

Rural is meaningless. You can't just assume things.

Locate is mandatory, policy. Because customer claimed there was nothing there when I hit the gas line.

neufuse

join:2006-12-06
James Creek, PA

1 recommendation

reply to ptrowski
Never been to Rome? *lol*


ptrowski
Got Helix?
Premium
join:2005-03-14
Putnam, CT
kudos:4
You got me on that one!

Austinloop

join:2001-08-19
Austin, TX
kudos:1
reply to aSic
The OP said: " locates on the property isnt required, as everything in the area is aerial except the CATV."

That may be true, especially if the contractor doing the burial of the cable enjoys receiving large bills and his insurance enjoys paying out large payments. There may be gas lines, buried fiber, and who knows what else that the trenching machine will be crossing. Depths can be very tricky when ditches are involved and the buried utility is now a lot closer to the surface than when originally buried.

I recall billing one contractor around $15K because he thought he knew where all the telephone cable was located, but managed to drill his hole dead center over a fiber optic cable.

AT&T, at least where I worked did not inventory drops such as you are asking be done. It is not cost effective. Even if your installation tech had the correct cable on the truck, he couldn't have hooked you up because of crossing the road requires that the cable be buried immediately. It isn't like a back yard where the service drop can be laid on the ground and the contractor show up a couple of days later to bury the drop.
--


aSic
application specific
Premium
join:2001-05-17
Wakulla, FL
Reviews:
·Comcast

2 edits
reply to ptrowski
said by ptrowski:

said by aSic:

@ tshirt See Profile, I agree, but doing locates on the property isnt required, as everything in the area is aerial except the CATV.

Interesting, never heard of aerial sewer and water lines before....

If we had municipal sewer and water, they probably would be aerial too considering the IQ of the neighboring populace (poo flingers!). I must remember not everyone lives in the woods like I do. All the homes have septic systems, and wells for water supply. Only "connections to the outside world" are power, phone, both aerial, and CATV, which is buried.

edit: as for the locate.. I agree with the other replies, if this was somewhere other than a private two-rut dirt easement bordering a state forest, that requires about a half mile drive off the highway to get to. There could likely be fiber, water, etc everywhere near civilization. However, the entire county is like this, minus homes on the actual highways, or near the unincorporated city center. Its not like the contractors are from another state. They live and work here. They know how it is. They know...well, at least I would know, that any home that is not on the actual highway or near a city center would more than likely need an extended drop.

I agree this situation is not common...for the rest of the world. But it is common in this area. Why wouldnt they be prepared?

I know this is like arguing with a rock, but thats why I put the Rant tag on the thread. To express my displeasure with the outcome.

--
Teamwork is a lot of people doing what I say.


ptrowski
Got Helix?
Premium
join:2005-03-14
Putnam, CT
kudos:4
Yes it's got to be frustrating, but your install is definitely not the norm so they can not have all things ready at all times.


ropeguru
Premium
join:2001-01-25
Mechanicsville, VA
reply to ptrowski
said by ptrowski:

said by aSic:

@ tshirt See Profile, I agree, but doing locates on the property isnt required, as everything in the area is aerial except the CATV.

Interesting, never heard of aerial sewer and water lines before....

Hmmm... Rural area, has well water and local septic tank. Never heard of this before?

You need to get out more.


ptrowski
Got Helix?
Premium
join:2005-03-14
Putnam, CT
kudos:4
I grew up in exactly an area like that. Was just poking fun at his comment of everything being aerial.


Streetlight

join:2005-11-07
Colorado Springs, CO
reply to ropeguru
You never know what's buried in a rural area.

I was visiting in-laws in Iowa some years ago when a massive explosion and fire occurred in the a corn/soybean field not far from us. Many Iowa farm fields have installed what are called tiles buried in their fields to drain water to fairly large drainage ditches. The machines that dig the trenches for the tiles are pretty big as the ditches are quite deep maybe as much as eight feet. During a tiling operation the trenching machine hit and ruptured a large, high pressure natural gas line setting the escaping gas on fire. The operators were all killed as was the driver of a pickup truck that had just been driven to the site. The woman driver was instantly turned to charcoal. Asphalt shingled residential roofs up to a mile away were melted. Closer houses were severely damaged.

Now, digging a trench with a small trenching machine isn't likely to go deep enough to reach such a pipe, but who knows. However, it may not go deep enough to prevent future damage to the buried Comcast cable. If you've lived in a rural area served by gravel roads you know that the road is maintained using a grader whose purpose is to rearrange the surface gravel and smooth out irregularities in the road. This maintenance could damage a buried cable close to the surface. It would seem to me that use of a directional boring machine would be appropriate. These machines bore down to about eight feet. Could such a machine run into a high pressure gas line the "knowledgeable" locals should know about? You bet!
--
There is nothing more deceptive than an obvious fact.

Sherlock Holmes in
The Boscombe Valley Mystery
A. C. Doyle
Strand Magazine, October 1891


Cthen

join:2004-08-01
Detroit, MI
Reviews:
·Verizon Wireless..
reply to DataRiker
said by DataRiker:

Cable is an easy system. You hook into a free tap on the pole ( or whatever you may have in your area ) and run it into the house.

Apparently with all these installs gone bad that we seem to see on a weekly and sometimes daily basis, that is not how it works. If it were just that easy, would Comcast need an estimated 10 pollaks to connect 1 house with 1 drop?

If it is supposed to be just that easy, why are customers not allowed to connect their own drops to the tap? It can't be theft anymore as the system has been upgraded to prevent that right?

Then to top it off, you can't even diagnose your own connection yet, your here trying to make a diagnosis to someone else's connection? »Review of Time Warner Cable by DataRiker

It supposed to easy right?
--
"I like to refer to myself as an Adult Film Efficienato." - Stuart Bondek


CableTool
Poorly Representing MYSELF.
Premium
join:2004-11-12
said by Cthen:

said by DataRiker:

Cable is an easy system. You hook into a free tap on the pole ( or whatever you may have in your area ) and run it into the house.

Apparently with all these installs gone bad that we seem to see on a weekly and sometimes daily basis, that is not how it works.

How many installs and Trouble calls would you GUESS happen each day?
And how many of those that were FLAWLESS are people running to DSLR to post how much of a non-event it was?

This guy is talking about being down a two rut dirt road in the sticks where everything is aerial EXCEPT the cable, and then goes on to state it should be a standard install and before even showing up the contractor that had "reconnect at 223 main st" on a workorder should have walked in with blueprints to the guys whole cableing system and property. This is a bit much to expect, and its cool that he does, but there isnt one company that has or keeps this info.
--
CableTechs.org/"Horrible People with Integrity"


DataRiker
Premium
join:2002-05-19
00000

4 edits
reply to Cthen
Cthen nobody is diagnosing anything. ( do you diagnose when you already know the problem? )

And yes cable is an extremely simple system, at least in comparison to VDSL. I've installed and supported both.

As for basing the "difficulty" of cable over an unhappy review of Time Warner, I will let the readers here judge the logic in that.

As an installer I loved cable, xDSL not so much.


DataRiker
Premium
join:2002-05-19
00000

3 edits

1 recommendation

reply to Cthen
said by Cthen:

It can't be theft anymore as the system has been upgraded to prevent that right?

It supposed to easy right?

You can still get about 100 channels here being hooked to any free tap.

And yes, once again, emphatically, cable is easy.

We currently run a 40+% repair/trouble ticket rate where I'm at now. With cable it was about 7 + or -%

Think about that.