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jlivingood
Premium,VIP
join:2007-10-28
Philadelphia, PA
kudos:3

[Speed] Heads-Up: Time to Replace Your DOCSIS 1.1 Modem

At Comcast, we actively work to provide a great broadband experience to our customers. As part of that, we regularly increase the broadband speeds for our customers. As a result, customers using DOCSIS 1.1 devices will increasingly be unable to enjoy the fullest possible broadband speeds. With this mind, we will very soon put all DOCSIS 1.1 modems into End-of-Service status -- from End-of-Life. This means we'll actively work to remove D1.1 devices from the network.

We will be sending notifications to customers using DOCSIS 1.1 modems with instructions on the upgrade process. Customers that lease a D1.1 device will will get a new device. Customers that own a D1.1 device will need to replace it.

For those of you that own a D1.1 device, we strongly recommend a D3.0 device to make that investment last as long as possible and to take advantage of channel bonding. Customers that own a D1.1 device can go to »mynewmodem.comcast.net to purchase an approved DOCSIS 3.0 cable modem (or your retail store of choice).

Thanks!
Jason

P.S. A related FAQ can be found at »customer.comcast.com/help-and-su···devices/
--
JL
Comcast


jlivingood
Premium,VIP
join:2007-10-28
Philadelphia, PA
kudos:3
From the FAQ:

What does it mean when a device is End-of-Life (EOL) or End-of-Support (EOS)?

An End-of-Life (EOL) device is any XFINITY Internet or Voice device that needs to be replaced after being made obsolete due to changes in technology. Older devices, such as cable modems, were not designed to support the faster speeds and improved security features that are available today.

For example, we have upgraded our network from the original DOCSIS 1.0 standard to the significantly improved and much more recent DOCSIS 3.0 standard. If you currently use a DOCSIS 1.1 device, you will not be able to enjoy the full benefits of our service such as higher speeds, greater security and better reliability.

In addition, an End-of-Life modem in most cases means the device's manufacturer has stopped providing support for a device, such as firmware dates and bug fixes. Occasionally, we will find a device that is defective and no longer sutable for use.

End-of-Life basically means we will no longer install the device, either as a new or replacement device. In addition, it means we no longer recommend that customers purchase these devices, whether new or used. It is also an advance warning that the device will soon need to be replaced.

Typically, if a device is identified as End-of-Life, it will subsequently move to End-of-Support (EOS) status. This means that when a device reaches End-of-Support status, it will no longer work on our network or be compatible with our network and/or services.

You can find out if your current device is End-of-Life by clicking here: »mydeviceinfo.comcast.net/end-of-life

Ready to upgrade?
If you lease a DOCSIS 1.1 device, chat online a Care agent to order a self-installation kit for a replacement device.

If you own your device, you can either choose to lease one from Comcast or purchase a new one yourself. To purchase a replacement, visit your local electronics store or go to »mynewmodem.comcast.net to buy online now.
--
JL
Comcast
Expand your moderator at work


JigglyWiggly

join:2009-07-12
Pleasanton, CA

1 edit

Re: [Speed] Heads-Up: Time to Replace Your DOCSIS 1.1 Modem

so no more TDMA I am assuming is the reason for this?


telcodad
Premium
join:2011-09-16
Lincroft, NJ
kudos:15
said by JigglyWiggly:

so no more TDMA I am ass uming is the reason for this?

I guess you're talking about Comcast possibly moving to the use of S-CDMA on the upstream, as talked about in this recent Light Reading Cable article: »www.lightreading.com/document.as···lr_cable


tshirt
Premium
join:2004-07-11
Snohomish, WA
kudos:5
reply to JigglyWiggly
And to better serve you.
Network management becomes a lot more efficient once the ENTIRE network is D3.
more efficient=more available bandwidth and speed potential.

eliminating D1.1 is the next step forward.

andyross
Premium,MVM
join:2003-05-04
Schaumburg, IL
reply to telcodad
said by telcodad:

said by JigglyWiggly:

so no more TDMA I am ass uming is the reason for this?

I guess you're talking about Comcast possibly moving to the use of S-CDMA on the upstream, as talked about in this recent Light Reading Cable article: »www.lightreading.com/document.as···lr_cable

Wouldn't getting rid of D1.x modems also allow them to eliminate 16QAM upstreams? I thought that 32 & 64QAM were new with D2. That can help upstream bandwidth a bit.

Kearnstd
Space Elf
Premium
join:2002-01-22
Mullica Hill, NJ
kudos:1
reply to jlivingood
getting rid of D1.1 also gets rid of lots of very old hardware, Old hardware that could have been causing unneeded TCs.
--
[65 Arcanist]Filan(High Elf) Zone: Broadband Reports


telcodad
Premium
join:2011-09-16
Lincroft, NJ
kudos:15
reply to andyross
Yes, the 16-QAM upstream carriers are currently needed to support any remaining DOCSIS 1.X devices on the network.

However, unless a move to S-CDMA is eventually made, I think it could be possible that some 16-QAMs might still be placed in the noisy, sub-20MHz region, where their lower SNR requirements (vs. 64-QAMs) come in handy, in order to provide a bit more (bonded) uplink speed.


newview
Ex .. Ex .. Exactly
Premium
join:2001-10-01
Parsonsburg, MD
kudos:1
Reviews:
·DIRECTV
·Comcast
reply to jlivingood
I'm glad to see that Comcast does not appear to have used this as an opportunity to sell a cable modem for $200.00 when you can get it anywhere else for $85.00.

There was a time that I saw Comcast prices upwards of $200.00 for a Motorola SB5100 ... ridiculous.


NetFixer
Bah Humbug
Premium
join:2004-06-24
The Boro
Reviews:
·Cingular Wireless
·Comcast Business..
·Vonage
said by newview:

I'm glad to see that Comcast does not appear to have used this as an opportunity to sell a cable modem for $200.00 when you can get it anywhere else for $85.00.

There was a time that I saw Comcast prices upwards of $200.00 for a Motorola SB5100 ... ridiculous.

Yes, f you read the fine print (or small logo) on the »mynewmodem.comcast.net/ site, you will see that Comcast is using Amazon.



--
We can never have enough of nature.
We need to witness our own limits transgressed, and some life pasturing freely where we never wander.


plencnerb
Premium
join:2000-09-25
Carpentersville, IL
kudos:3
reply to tshirt
said by tshirt:

And to better serve you.
Network management becomes a lot more efficient once the ENTIRE network is D3.
more efficient=more available bandwidth and speed potential.

eliminating D1.1 is the next step forward.

I totally agree with this statement.

My question is, how soon will Comcast move forward with doing something similar with the D2.x modems and eMTA's? If the eventual goal is to have everything be D3, why not just jump to that point right away?

--Brian
--
============================
--Brian Plencner

E-Mail: CoasterBrian72Cancer@gmail.com
Note: Kill Cancer to Reply via e-mail


tshirt
Premium
join:2004-07-11
Snohomish, WA
kudos:5
Reviews:
·Comcast
A good question, Maybe Jason can answer for certain.
I'd guess that because D2 is closer to D3 than D1.1, but was never widely adopted, it can co-exist for the meantime, which may not be more then a year or two which is why he suggested a D3 modem, and probably should have hinted at IPv6 CERTIFIED (per comcast's list) for best future longevitity (only the future is future-proof)
I think the logistics of replacing EVERY rented modem dictates the staged replacement ("ah, run down to bestbuy and get 10-12 million D3 modems, before lunch, would cha' " )


DrDrew
That others may surf
Premium
join:2009-01-28
SoCal
kudos:17

2 recommendations

DOCSIS isn't used by just modems and eMTAs.

Don't forget all the cables boxes (DCH, DCX, etc.) with non-D3 modems in them that will be used as iGuide is replaced.

Along with that are various status monitoring modules on plant power supplies and other things that may use DOCSIS modems for communications.


plencnerb
Premium
join:2000-09-25
Carpentersville, IL
kudos:3

1 recommendation

reply to tshirt
I do agree. Doing it in stages (remove the 1.0 first, then the 1.1 next, and then remove the 2.x last) is the best move.

Not to mention, those with D2 eMTA's (like myself) have very few (if any options) to purchase a D3 eMTA on their own. While I rent, I know there are quite a number of people who do purchase, and if they have a D2 eMTA now, and want to go buy a D3 one, the options are not very good (if any exist at all).

Hopefully when Comcast does force the D2's off the network, there will be more options to purchase a D3 eMTA then there are now.

--Brian
--
============================
--Brian Plencner

E-Mail: CoasterBrian72Cancer@gmail.com
Note: Kill Cancer to Reply via e-mail


tshirt
Premium
join:2004-07-11
Snohomish, WA
kudos:5
Reviews:
·Comcast
said by plencnerb:

Hopefully when Comcast does force the D2's off the network, there will be more options to purchase a D3 eMTA then there are now.

--Brian

That you can be sure of, this is a huge market, with new product being introduced as we speak, testing and ceritifcation coming soon.


IowaCowboy
Iowa native
Premium
join:2010-10-16
Springfield, MA
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Verizon Broadban..
·Comcast
reply to jlivingood
I saw on the rate sheet (printed flyer with Comcast rates and fees picked up from local Comcast office) for my area that you can purchase a voice/data modem from Comcast. I am wondering if it is possible to purchase an Arris TG862G or what modem I would be supplied with if I purchased a voice data. I own an Arris TM722G (that is not in use) at Best Buy when they were selling them. The only modems I see on the website you mentioned is the data only modems.

I currently rent the TG852G modem but am interested in purchasing it as I prefer to own and not rent. I would like to purchase an EMTA that supports 8x4 channel bonding vs 4x4 channel bonding.
--
I wish I still lived in Iowa; Everything there from rent and groceries to Cable TV is much cheaper in Iowa (especially with an overbuilder in town).

Oedipus

join:2005-05-09
kudos:1

1 edit
Me too. As it stands, there's no easy way to upgrade to an 8x4 EMTA.


jlivingood
Premium,VIP
join:2007-10-28
Philadelphia, PA
kudos:3
said by Oedipus:

Me too. As it stands, there's no easy way to upgrade to an 8x4 EMTA.

Excellent suggestion -- noted.
--
JL
Comcast


jlivingood
Premium,VIP
join:2007-10-28
Philadelphia, PA
kudos:3
reply to tshirt
said by tshirt:

A good question, Maybe Jason can answer for certain.
I'd guess that because D2 is closer to D3 than D1.1, but was never widely adopted, it can co-exist for the meantime, which may not be more then a year or two which is why he suggested a D3 modem, and probably should have hinted at IPv6 CERTIFIED (per comcast's list) for best future longevitity (only the future is future-proof)

Unless someone is happy to be on the Economy tier for a long time you are going to need to do channel bonding to take full advantage of your speeds in the future, and that means you want a D3 device. You also want that investment to last a long time and not learn that your D2 device is in End of Life or End Of Service status in a year or two. You also want modern features like IPv6, and to know that the vendor is still releasing firmware updates periodically.
--
JL
Comcast

ExoticFish

join:2008-08-31
Stuarts Draft, VA
All of which is dependent upon Comcast upgrading all systems to D3.
--
»www.VAJeeps.com


TriForce

join:2008-05-27
Chico, CA

1 edit
reply to jlivingood
Nevermind, wrong question to ask. D2 modems will still work but won't be capable of new speeds. D1 modems will fail to work.

rendrenner

join:2005-09-03
Grandville, MI
reply to jlivingood
With recommendations to go to a D3 modem now, is Comcast going to increase availability of D3 modems so techs can swap out devices for those customers who rent from Comcast?

cwpc

join:2003-04-13
Crum Lynne, PA
reply to jlivingood
iF i lease a D2 EMTA can i request a D3 device to ensure future compatability?


tshirt
Premium
join:2004-07-11
Snohomish, WA
kudos:5
Reviews:
·Comcast
I'm sure they will notify and ship D3 devices to you well before it is required.
for our area going all digital for tv, we just recieve a second letter with still a month to go (and we already had the new equipment delivered a week ago, plus they will attempt to call any remaining subs.
It is never in ComCasts interest to make thing more difficult that nessesary for any customer so cutting people off or forcing 2 replacemnts in short order will be rare mistake (it probably will happen, but they are working hard to avoid that.

ExoticFish

join:2008-08-31
Stuarts Draft, VA
reply to cwpc
You may have to temporally upgrade to a D3 tier, but you can drop it back down after they replace your modem.
--
»www.VAJeeps.com


koitsu
Premium,MVM
join:2002-07-16
Mountain View, CA
kudos:23
reply to jlivingood
jlivingood See Profile, I have a question pertaining to the Comcast CSR side of things when it comes to troubleshooting.

With DOCSIS 1.x and 2.x modems, a subscriber's modem negotiates a single downstream and single upstream carrier frequency (e.g. 2 channels total).

However, with DOCSIS 3.x and use of channel bonding, depending on the modem brand and the configuration on Comcast's side, a modem can have up to 8 downstream carriers and 4 (or more?) upstream carriers in use simultaneously. (For example, my SB6121 negotiates 4 downstream / 3 upstream, while my Zoom 5431J negotates 8 downstream / 3 upstream). The advantage here is that this "distributes the load" across multiple frequencies. But you know this already.

Here's my question:

Every single time I have spoken to Comcast CSRs about problems with a carrier frequency range (e.g. "an issue with a single channel") -- and here's a real-world example -- the CSR appears to have absolutely no visibility into this (or if they do, they aren't being trained how to do it). Instead, they just say "your upstream looks fine" and "your downstream looks fine". I ask them to give me numbers (for which a SB6121 should show them 4 downstream SNRs and power levels, and 3 upstream SNRs and power levels), but all they appear to have on their screen is a single downstream SNR + power level and a single upstream SNR + power level. This does not help when it comes to DOCSIS 3.x.

I hope you can see where I'm going with this... The problem quickly becomes an argument while on the phone; "no, my modem shows that downstream carrier freq. 753MHz has a serious SNR problem" "Well sir our system shows that your downstream SNR is just fine".

So with the major push to DOCSIS 3.x, is something being done about this from a customer service perspective? Visibility into all the details is extremely important when it comes to troubleshooting issues, while the existing system seems to be set up with the DOCSIS 1.x / 2.x mentality in mind.

Can you shed some light on this? Thanks!
--
Making life hard for others since 1977.
I speak for myself and not my employer/affiliates of my employer.


jlivingood
Premium,VIP
join:2007-10-28
Philadelphia, PA
kudos:3
reply to cwpc
said by cwpc:

iF i lease a D2 EMTA can i request a D3 device to ensure future compatability?

It is always dependent upon local inventory / supply but it never hurts to ask for a D3 device when you are given a new / replacement leased device.
--
JL
Comcast


jlivingood
Premium,VIP
join:2007-10-28
Philadelphia, PA
kudos:3

3 recommendations

reply to koitsu
said by koitsu:

Every single time I have spoken to Comcast CSRs about problems with a carrier frequency range (e.g. "an issue with a single channel") -- and here's a real-world example -- the CSR appears to have absolutely no visibility into this (or if they do, they aren't being trained how to do it). Instead, they just say "your upstream looks fine" and "your downstream looks fine". I ask them to give me numbers (for which a SB6121 should show them 4 downstream SNRs and power levels, and 3 upstream SNRs and power levels), but all they appear to have on their screen is a single downstream SNR + power level and a single upstream SNR + power level. This does not help when it comes to DOCSIS 3.x.

Good feedback - which relates to the tools that our Care team has. Let me give that some thought and see what we can do to solve it.
--
JL
Comcast


mb

join:2000-07-23
Washington, NJ
Just ordered a Motorola SB6141. Does it support IPV6, my SB6120 does, and can it be configured via the walled garden method or must I call in?