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UHF
All static, all day, Forever
Premium,MVM
join:2002-05-24
Reviews:
·Mediacom
·Callcentric
·Dish Network
reply to itguy05

Re: VZW Home Phone Connect

said by itguy05:

One thing to remember is that cell phones still use the POTS network to complete a call. Few cell sites are connected via RF for phone calls. So if the POTS is down to that cell site you're still out of luck....

The cell is connected generally by fiber optic or copper back to a MTSO where the call officially hits the POTS network. If copper, it likely goes through a telco switch somewhere, or more likely, several switches. If fiber, it all depends on who owns the fiber, but it like goes through a POP somewhere that needs to remain powered up.

It used to be that a lot of cell sites actually WERE RF connected via microwave, and may still be, but most of the newer cell towers I'm seeing no longer have the microwave dishes on them. Either way, they have to get back to the MTSO to hop on the POTS network.

itguy05

join:2005-06-17
Carlisle, PA
That's my point. If it can't get out of the cell tower it can't get to the POTS network. IOW: if that tree takes out the phone pole too (many around here are electric, phone, and cable, etc) it won't matter.


AVD
Respice, Adspice, Prospice
Premium
join:2003-02-06
Onion, NJ
kudos:1
said by itguy05:

That's my point. If it can't get out of the cell tower it can't get to the POTS network. IOW: if that tree takes out the phone pole too (many around here are electric, phone, and cable, etc) it won't matter.

the cell tower can be miles away from your house, and I'm sure their communications feed is a lot harder than the pots line to your house.
--
--Standard disclaimers apply.--

itguy05

join:2005-06-17
Carlisle, PA
said by AVD:

the cell tower can be miles away from your house, and I'm sure their communications feed is a lot harder than the pots line to your house.

In many areas they all run over the same lines. And in many cases they also run on the same telephone poles.

Where I work we have many data circuits (T1, DS-x, etc). They all terminate at one or 2 poles outside of our office. From the pole to the building is underground but the rest of it is the same pole that carries power, CATV, and phone lines. If that "last mile" is down you're SOL. (Its why ours come in from 2 separate poles that have separate paths.


49528867
Premium
join:2010-04-16
Fort Lauderdale, FL
kudos:3
reply to UHF
said by UHF:

If copper, it likely goes through a telco switch somewhere, or more likely, several switches.

No if it is copper it will be a point to point DS1 between the site and the MTSO usually being a DS1 to a CO and from there muxed up to fiber, however that is becoming quite rare as the carriers discovered when they moved from 2G to 3G their bandwidth demands made it uneconomical to just keep on piling DS1’s into a site versus pulling in fiber and be done with it once and for all.

Wayne
--
Madness takes its toll, please have exact change ready…


UHF
All static, all day, Forever
Premium,MVM
join:2002-05-24
Reviews:
·Mediacom
·Callcentric
·Dish Network
said by 49528867:

No if it is copper it will be a point to point DS1 between the site and the MTSO usually being a DS1 to a CO and from there muxed up to fiber

I've never seen a DS1 to a cell tower that did not pass through a CO at some point. Almost always goes to a local CO where it hits a DCS before heading on to where ever it's going. Then again, I've only dealt with cellular in a rural setting, where thousands of square miles and several area codes are covered by a single MTSO. And I've been out of that business since 1999.

But in the case were a line, either DS1 or fiber is leased from the telco or a third party, there's going to a POP somewhere that could become vulnerable.

I guess what I'm saying is nothing is 100% fail proof


49528867
Premium
join:2010-04-16
Fort Lauderdale, FL
kudos:3
said by UHF:

I've never seen a DS1 to a cell tower that did not pass through a CO at some point. Almost always goes to a local CO where it hits a DCS before heading on to where ever it's going.

But a DACS while commonly referred to as a switch is really a mapped test point device and unlike a CO switch has its inputs and outputs nailed up and unless the mapping is changed it really does little switching what so ever.

For the most part the only non-mapped switching in say a 3/1 DACS is to take a DS3 break it out to a DS1 level and then allow those individual DS1’s to be connected to a test-point for A or Z end testing.

But in the case were a line, either DS1 or fiber is leased from the telco or a third party, there's going to a POP somewhere that could become vulnerable.

Maybe but in my opinion most of the POP’s are well up in the network and as such are rather hardened.

I guess what I'm saying is nothing is 100% fail proof

It ain’t 99.999 anymore that is for sure…

Wayne
--
Madness takes its toll, please have exact change ready…


dennismurphy
Put me on hold? I'll put YOU on hold
Premium
join:2002-11-19
Parsippany, NJ
kudos:3
Reviews:
·Verizon FiOS
said by 49528867:

It ain’t 99.999 anymore that is for sure…

Some parts of the network are, but certainly not the entire thing ...

Typical HLR uptime is somewhere in the 99.99999 range or so.


UHF
All static, all day, Forever
Premium,MVM
join:2002-05-24
Reviews:
·Mediacom
·Callcentric
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said by dennismurphy:

said by 49528867:

It ain’t 99.999 anymore that is for sure…

Some parts of the network are, but certainly not the entire thing ...

Typical HLR uptime is somewhere in the 99.99999 range or so.

I think Bell tried to have five nines uptime at the customer premises. I don't know what the uptime of my wireless carrier is, but I can't remember the last time I was unable to make a phone call.


nunya
LXI 483
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join:2000-12-23
O Fallon, MO
kudos:12
Reviews:
·Charter
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In the olden days, "Five Nines" wasn't a try, it was reality. Up until deregulation, quality and customer service was of the utmost importance (contrary to what a lot of people on DSLR will say). If it took 3 hours of over-time or 1-1/2 day to restore a single customer, so be it. Breakup (divestiture) "slit the wrists" of that mindset, and TA96 was a 50 yard, 30-06, "headshot" to the idea that quality work was an essential part of providing good customer service.
--
If someone refers to herself / himself as a "guru", they probably aren't.


Jack_in_VA
Premium
join:2007-11-26
North, VA
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Millenicom
reply to UHF
said by UHF:

said by dennismurphy:

said by 49528867:

It ain’t 99.999 anymore that is for sure…

Some parts of the network are, but certainly not the entire thing ...

Typical HLR uptime is somewhere in the 99.99999 range or so.

I think Bell tried to have five nines uptime at the customer premises. I don't know what the uptime of my wireless carrier is, but I can't remember the last time I was unable to make a phone call.

I can. It was about 2 weeks out of every two months. That's how long it took Verizon to get the report and schedule the repair. Even when it was up the hum and static sometimes made hearing impossible. We went to home connect out of desperation and so far it's been great.


Jack_in_VA
Premium
join:2007-11-26
North, VA
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Millenicom
reply to nunya
said by nunya:

In the olden days, "Five Nines" wasn't a try, it was reality. Up until deregulation, quality and customer service was of the utmost importance (contrary to what a lot of people on DSLR will say). If it took 3 hours of over-time or 1-1/2 day to restore a single customer, so be it. Breakup (divestiture) "slit the wrists" of that mindset, and TA96 was a 50 yard, 30-06, "headshot" to the idea that quality work was an essential part of providing good customer service.

That's absolutely right. My first wife and many of my classmates went to work for C&P out of high school. I assure you they didn't have the rabble that evolved when C&P became Bell Atlantic and then Verizon.