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Pin
Premium
join:2002-06-19
The Dungeon

[Chat] While I'm folding away, I need some pet rescue advice.

A few people at work or their relatives participate in pet rescue activities. Some adopt and some house or foster if they weren't adopted in a timely fashion ( not sure what it's called in the circles ).

I could probably just adopt a few dogs from a pet rescue, but I kinda wanted to participate in the rescue. So I was thinking about the housing or fostering of rescued dogs. In particular Weimaraner's.

I like the Weimaraner because it's an outdoor breed, but all the rescues seem to require them to be indoors.

I live on 2 acres and my wife likes to jog, so I thought it was a good match. I also don't need teething pups eating the trim off my front porch, again.

I would like any advice on how to get started in this full time volunteer position and any requirements that come along with it. My 2 labs and my dachshund have passed from age several years ago and I miss having dogs around. The cats on the other hand seem to want to live to 30 or so.

Thanks in advance,
Pin
--
time nor tide wait for no man...


Icarus
CHAOS RULES
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Re: [Chat] While I'm folding away, I need some pet rescue advic

said by Pin:



I like the Weimaraner because it's an outdoor breed, but all the rescues seem to require them to be indoors.

I think if youre saying you want to be able to have them live outdoors 24/7 then you may be out of luck as far as rescues go. I cant speak for all of them but for the rescue groups Ive dealt with,thats a big No No.
--
Just cause you got the monkey off your back doesn't mean the circus has left town.
Team Helix- Folding@Home and Rosetta@Home


Pin
Premium
join:2002-06-19
The Dungeon
I think mostly I want to be able to let them outdoors as much or as long as they want. The other reason I picked the Weimaraner is that they seem to be a pretty good indoor breed also, but I want to be able to do both.

Seems they like to run and I have some room for them to do that.
--
time nor tide wait for no man...


Icarus
CHAOS RULES
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That may require they have a fenced in area,but if youre willing to do that it shouldnt be an issue as far as my understanding of what rescue groups require. I think the problem they are trying to avoid is people who adopt animals and then tie them outdoors and neglect them.
--
Just cause you got the monkey off your back doesn't mean the circus has left town.
Team Helix- Folding@Home and Rosetta@Home


rusdi
American V
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Flippin, AR
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reply to Pin
Been my experience, next to Weimaraners, a Labrador retriever is about as loyal, and gentle "family" dog as you can get.

I love Weimaraners. Those piercing grey eyes! Playful, and as smart as many smarter than most of my human friends/relatives!
--
Come fold for a cure with us @ Team Helix.


signmeuptoo
Bless you Howie
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join:2001-11-22
NanoParticle
kudos:5
reply to Pin
If no one here has any expertise, my departed dad's girlfriend knows something about this, she is very involved in the thing. I can contact her for information. She likes Bostons, as does one of my sisters.

Me, I like medium large dogs myself, I used to have a half wolf that I rescued, he was amazing, almost human at times and I miss him terribly.
--
Join Teams Helix and Discovery. Rest in Peace, Leonard David Smith, my best friend, you are missed badly! Rest in peace, Pop, glad our last years were good. Please pray for Colin, he has ependymoma, a brain cancer, donate to a children's Hospital.


Pin
Premium
join:2002-06-19
The Dungeon
said by signmeuptoo:

If no one here has any expertise, my departed dad's girlfriend knows something about this, she is very involved in the thing.

I thought there were some here that did, maybe I am remembering wrong. I am curious about what it takes to home or foster an dog until they are adopted.

One of my concerns is that they want vet records. I only have vet records for when they were sick. When it comes to regular treatments ( heartworm, rabies, etc. ), the county 4H or FFA always had drives that I used for $5 per customer (pet) but I get no records that I kept them up to date on vacinations, etc. That worries me since they seem to want a history that I can't prove. It's a cash and carry drive thru at the local schools on specific weekends and is much more reasonable than one vacination from the vet. Local vets volunteer to administer the dosages.
--
time nor tide wait for no man...


Icarus
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reply to Pin
Jo will be here,and with lots of good info Im sure.


jopfef
Home of the BeaChi Boys
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reply to Pin
Jo, is here. Jo got hammered by the leftovers from Hurricane Isaac, so we had a whole day of wonderful, marvelous rain, and Jo had a whole day of a "wonderful" migraine from the storms. Blech.

Rescue is a heartwarming, and sometimes, heartbreaking, thing to be involved in, believe me. I've been involved in rescue driving for a number of years, also in doing overnight holds, and also in holding some critters for extended periods of time, depending on how trips get arranged. That happens more often in the winter than it does in the summer, due to Mother Nature interfering with things. A healthy vehicle is an absolute must when doing this; you cannot have a clunker that is going to break down on the road with a vehicle full of critters, specially in the summer when it's hot outside. Many times, alot of the dogs are what are called "flight risks", either from puppy mill situations or from abusive situations, and having a safe vehicle that can go point-to-point is critical for these types of animals. I'll give you an example of a flight risk that I did on an extended hold. A father-son combination of White Shepards, completely feral, and they had been live trapped somewhere in Texas. They were enroute to a Shepard rescue group in Michigan, and I volunteered to hold them until they had the space for them and the rest of the route could be worked out. They arrived in very large crates, and the drivers were kind enough to carry the crates into my livingroom. I was warned that they had not been handled since being trapped, and to be extremely cautious with them since nobody knew how they would react around people or other dogs. My first reaction was that they were glad to eat when I fed them, and didn't react to me when I put their food in their crates; good signs. So to potty them outside, I put my dogs in the bedroom, and then carefully removed them individually from the crate, triple leashed, and walked each of them in the back yard. Bologna was the order of the day; successful pottying was rewarded immediately, and both dogs were housebroken within a week. They were always fed in their crates, and gradually became friends with my dogs through the bars of their crates, to the point that by the end of the second week, I would let them out one at a time to socialize with my Yellow Lab. By the end of the third week, they were socializing with all of my dogs, and were very comfortable in the house. Of course, getting petted and hugged were also worked in along the way, and they relished being on the dog couch along with the other dogs. I documented their development on paper and with pictures, and sent it along with them when they finally left a month later. Nancy, the head of the Shepard group in Michigan, couldn't believe the dogs when they arrived! She got a set of happy, confident, socialized dogs, housebroken and leash-trained, so all she had to do was get them neutered and current on their vaccines. I made her promise me that they would go as a bonded pair when they got adopted, since I was pretty sure they needed to stay together. She did get them a home together, so it was a happy ending for everyone, except for me when they left to go to her. I cried, but it was a happy sort of crying when they left.

I can guarantee you, that a fenced yard is an absolute MUST for anyone doing rescue work, particularly if you're going to hold dogs at your home. And rescue dogs are held INSIDE the home, not outside. That is mandatory with every rescue group I've ever worked for or with, and I've never heard of any group that does anything different from those requirements. Most rescue groups will require some sort of documentation and recommendations from your vet from you, so don't be surprised if you get asked for that. Allowing dogs to "run loose" on your property, unless it's properly fenced, is absolutely OUT. Rescue dogs tend to very skittish, since their lives have been turned upside down and many of them just don't know what has happened to change everything. Some can be depressed, which can be difficult to deal with also. I had a darling little elderly Beagle here on a week's hold, and just couldn't get her to eat; she was just so sad about everything. My dogs are hogs and will eat anything in sight, and even that didn't help her. Got a package delivered one day, opened it and got the contents out, put the box on the floor, and she came to life! Had a blast destroying the box, left me a shredded box mess to clean up, but was a completely different little dog after that, and started to eat and play. So her secret was cardboard boxes -- she loved to shred them, but not eat them! I gave her a box a day to keep her happy while she was with me, and sent along the information with her when she left to go to her new family.

I'm not too sure that any rescue group is going to allow your wife to take any rescue dog out jogging with her. The risk of losing a rescue dog while out running is too great, and they already have a financial investment in that dog, and most likely aren't willing to risk the loss. Knock on wood, I have never lost a dog in my care, for which I'm very grateful. I have known people who have lost dogs in their care, and it's a devastating experience for them. So take that information to heart. Absolute care and control of their dogs is an essential part of doing rescue work; they are not your dogs, but the rescue groups' dogs. You must always remember that. And don't get too attached to every dog that comes in the door; they're going to leave again; remember that!

And I should take my own advice.


Tigger and Pooh, on my bed a few days ago

--
"I can't save them all, but I sure as hell CAN help move them to safety." - Jo

"...If the beasts were gone, we would die from a great loneliness of spirit." - Chief Seattle


Pin
Premium
join:2002-06-19
The Dungeon

1 recommendation

Thank you for the info Jo.

Guess I need to start looking at estimates for fences. I really hate fences, mostly because they don't work. Little dogs go under them and my Brittany Spaniel would just climb over the top of them. 4ft, 6ft, 8ft didn't matter; the Brittany (Rusty) would just climb them until he could get to what he was after.
--
time nor tide wait for no man...


onDvine
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reply to jopfef
Slightly off topic: Tigger and Pooh are adorable!


jopfef
Home of the BeaChi Boys
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said by onDvine:

Slightly off topic: Tigger and Pooh are adorable!

Thanks, D!

The BeaChis, as they are now known, are holy terrors, but loveable and keep me busy chasing after them, cleaning up their "destructo" messes. They tear up/shred anything they can get their little chompers on, Pooh being by far the worse of the two. I wish they would do just cardboard boxes or something easy, but NO, they like blankets, pillows, and more expensive stuff. Bad boys -- LOL!!!
--
"I can't save them all, but I sure as hell CAN help move them to safety." - Jo

"...If the beasts were gone, we would die from a great loneliness of spirit." - Chief Seattle