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ZWeisman
Premium
join:2008-12-20
Long Beach, CA

[connectivity] Office DSL Connection Lost During Faxes

I have a friend who has a business. They have Verizon DSL. They have 4 phone lines. Two are for calls, one is for faxing and one is for a credit card machine. They have filters on every device. The modem is a Westell Wind River F90-610015-06 Rev. F.

The problem is the internet connection seems to be dropped whenever the fax machine is sending or receiving. Verizon wants to charge a lot of money to come and fix it and I am being asked about this as a friend in IT. What I am looking for is suggestions on what this might be and how to possibly fix it. What are common causes and their solutions? This has been going on for a long time now.

Please advise. Any help would be appreciated!



trp2525
Premium
join:2008-02-24
Fall River, MA

You say that your friend has 4 phone lines but you didn't say which of those 4 phone lines has the DSL on it. Is the DSL on the phone line that is used for faxing?

You also say that there are filters "on every device." You would only need to place a filter on any device that is hooked up to the phone line that has the DSL on it. If the DSL is on the fax line, you would ONLY need to place a filter on the fax machine and nothing else (assuming there are no other devices that use that fax line).



ZWeisman
Premium
join:2008-12-20
Long Beach, CA

You are right. I know that filters need only be on that line with the DSL. I am assuming it's on the fax line as it's when they use the fax machine the internet connection disruption occurs. By every device I guess I meant just the fax machine but was using her words that filters are on every device on the line.

I mentioned that there are 4 lines just in case that somehow the lines are messing with each other. I can't see how but who knows. I haven't actually seen the office yet and I am trying to get ideas for things to look for when I am actually there. I keep telling them to just have a professional do this but they refuse to pay for it. *sigh* So I am trying to do what I can.



trp2525
Premium
join:2008-02-24
Fall River, MA

said by ZWeisman:

...I mentioned that there are 4 lines just in case that somehow the lines are messing with each other. I can't see how but who knows...

You could possibly be having a crosstalk problem of one line bleeding over to another line and causing interference. This is usually minimized by the use of twisted pairs telephone cabling. If the telephone cabling in the office (or going to the office) is very old and is non-twisted pairs (unlikely but possible), the lines would be more susceptible to crosstalk especially with data transmission.

I think your best bet would be to have Verizon install a DSL/POTS splitter at the NID and run a dedicated "home run" line directly to the DSL modem. That will eliminate any problems with internal wiring in the office and it will also eliminate the need for DSL filters on any device in the office.

There may not even be a charge to have Verizon install the DSL splitter and run the "home run" to the modem especially seeing that you are having problems. They did it for me at my home and I was not charged for the work. If you have them work on existing internal wiring after the NID, however, that is another story as far as charging for their services. As always, YMMV in your local Verizon service area.


rollinraver

join:2002-04-27
Buffalo, NY
reply to ZWeisman

If your DSL and fax are on the same phone number, please ensure you are NOT using the "extension" jack on the fax machine itself to run your modem. As odd as it may sound, I have seen this enough in my travels, especially at small businesses, to know people really do this. If you only have one jack available for both the modem and fax, then split the jack, filter the fax machine, and put the modem, UNfiltered, into the other slot.



Telcoguru
Premium
join:2005-08-22
Fresh Meadows, NY
reply to ZWeisman

Make sure the filters are plugged in at the jack and not on the back of the phones or fax machine. The filters work in one direction so they may be installed backwards. You may also have a bad filter.



Smith6612
Premium,MVM
join:2008-02-01
North Tonawanda, NY
kudos:24
Reviews:
·Verizon Online DSL
·Frontier Communi..
reply to rollinraver

said by rollinraver:

If your DSL and fax are on the same phone number, please ensure you are NOT using the "extension" jack on the fax machine itself to run your modem. As odd as it may sound, I have seen this enough in my travels, especially at small businesses, to know people really do this. If you only have one jack available for both the modem and fax, then split the jack, filter the fax machine, and put the modem, UNfiltered, into the other slot.

+1

said by Telcoguru:

Make sure the filters are plugged in at the jack and not on the back of the phones or fax machine. The filters work in one direction so they may be installed backwards. You may also have a bad filter.

+1 this as well.

If the problem isn't the above, I'd definitely take a good look at the wiring and also consider a home run to the modem. There may be crosstalk if they're using the older quad cable or there's some degraded pairs.


ZWeisman
Premium
join:2008-12-20
Long Beach, CA
reply to ZWeisman

So apparently there is one cable for this line. It goes to a splitter. From the splitter there is 2 cables. One goes to the fax machine which has a filter on it and the other cable goes to the DSL modem which goes to the PC. I am thinking that this setup could be the problem based on what was said here. Is this the likely cause?

Thanks for all the replies.



Smith6612
Premium,MVM
join:2008-02-01
North Tonawanda, NY
kudos:24
Reviews:
·Verizon Online DSL
·Frontier Communi..

If the splitter is bad it could be causing an issue. Same thing with the filter going bad or being installed incorrectly. Then again, also cannot rule out some copper issue somewhere that's causing a problem. Shorts or oxidation that "clears" when the line is off the hook can definitely knock out the DSL.