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SwedishRider
Rider on the Storm
Premium
join:2006-01-11
not Sweden
kudos:1
reply to Grumpy

Re: Portable Generator question

said by Grumpy:

Just a thought - install by other than a licensed pro could void renter's insurance coverage.

If by some chance your install was at fault for a claim, your personal assets liability is the excess of your coverage limits. In other words, if sued successfully for $250,000 and your coverage is $100,000 - you are on the hook for the difference, ie $150, 000 as supplied by your personal assets, in addition to your legal fees to defend yourself once your insurance carrier steps aside for the excess portion of your trial.

See also, »en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Subrogation

Just sayin...

I don't think the licensed pro has anything to do with it. One can do their own work and the insurance will cover it IF a proper building inspection permit is pulled, work is inspected, and approval is granted.

Getting a pro to do the work and not having it inspected is equally problematic. In the end, it's the homeowner's responsibility to make sure all proper permits are in place (at least it's that way in Connecticut). Failure to do so can create insurance payment problems in the event of a claim.

Zach1
Premium
join:2006-11-26
NW Minnesota
In this case, the OP is a tenant. So without the landlord's blessing, he can't (legally) do anything to the electrical system. Even with the go-ahead from the LL, he can't legally (in most jurisdictions) do the work unless he's licensed and pulls the proper permits. In most places the owner can legally do his/her own work provided the premises are owner-occupied. I know people do what the want but when things go wrong, one can find themselves referred to as "the defendant" with out any help from the insurance company(ies). I get several calls a year from people get who get busted doing unlicensed work and are willing to pay to "use my license" to pull permits and stand-by for inspections. Uh, not only NO but HELL NO!
--
Zach


SwedishRider
Rider on the Storm
Premium
join:2006-01-11
not Sweden
kudos:1
said by Zach1:

In this case, the OP is a tenant. So without the landlord's blessing, he can't (legally) do anything to the electrical system. Even with the go-ahead from the LL, he can't legally (in most jurisdictions) do the work unless he's licensed and pulls the proper permits. In most places the owner can legally do his/her own work provided the premises are owner-occupied. I know people do what the want but when things go wrong, one can find themselves referred to as "the defendant" with out any help from the insurance company(ies). I get several calls a year from people get who get busted doing unlicensed work and are willing to pay to "use my license" to pull permits and stand-by for inspections. Uh, not only NO but HELL NO!

You are right. Wasn't thinking about the tenant/landlord angle, but you are correct as pro is required in that case. I think permits are still required even if pro is doing the work as far as I know..


fifty nine

join:2002-09-25
Sussex, NJ
kudos:2
reply to Zach1
said by Zach1:

In this case, the OP is a tenant. So without the landlord's blessing, he can't (legally) do anything to the electrical system. Even with the go-ahead from the LL, he can't legally (in most jurisdictions) do the work unless he's licensed and pulls the proper permits. In most places the owner can legally do his/her own work provided the premises are owner-occupied. I know people do what the want but when things go wrong, one can find themselves referred to as "the defendant" with out any help from the insurance company(ies). I get several calls a year from people get who get busted doing unlicensed work and are willing to pay to "use my license" to pull permits and stand-by for inspections. Uh, not only NO but HELL NO!

That's why generlink is perfect. It's utility equipment like th meter. In most places no permit is required.