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shdd

@dslextreme.com

When drive doesn't show up in BIOS does that mean it's dead?

I was fortunate to never have a hard drive fail on me in my life. It happened yesterday. I would boot up, and the drive would make a clicking noise. I didn't think much of it until the afternoon when I got a SMART error when booting up again.

So I loaded a boot CD and went to the Samsung diagnostic tool. It scanned for 6 hours (this was a 2 TB drive) and at the end it simply said the drive has an error. While the drive was struggling, I think Samsung's tool effectively killed it off to put it out of its misery I guess.

Afterwards, the drive would no longer show up under my BIOS's SATA area. I unplugged it and plugged it back in. Still not there. Although I do hear some clicking noise when it boots up, not sure why SATA doesn't see it though. Does this mean the drive is totally dead and should be thrown out / recycled?

Luckily I have everything backed up so I'm not too stressed out, I just hate that the drive died so fast (it's under a year old) and wasted my money. I said to myself I will never buy Samsung again, as it was my first one since it was on sale, and now I see it looks like they sold their hard drive division to Seagate... enough said.


Candoo3

join:2005-01-24
I have a question posted here as well about Seagate RMA. This one I bought this past Christmas, so, 8 months of use. I had been using it as my back up drive for my 4 or 5 yr old WD 1T Black. Oh, the irony !!

bbear2
Premium
join:2003-10-06
94045
kudos:5
reply to shdd
If it's within the warranty period you could do an RMA. I was going to suggest that you unplug BOTH the data and power connectors to the drive and then replug them back it - while system is un-powered of course. But as long as you've done that and you system was recognizing the drive before, yada yada yada. As a last ditch effort, you could plug the drive into a different SATA port on the MB, making sure it's not related to that. Or you could also try it in another system. This will eliminate other variables as well. Clicking noise is never good to hear from a drive.


shdd

@dslextreme.com
reply to shdd
Good thing I didn't get rid of it. It's been brought back to life. Somehow.

I messed around with the cables, I'm honestly not sure what I did, but when I later booted up it showed the drive in BIOS. It was still going click-click-click though very loudly.

I then did some searching on Seagate's website since I couldn't find anything on Samsung, and they had an update for my drive. I flashed the drive, shut down the computer, turned it back on... and guess what. No clicking noise. No SMART error. Back to normal.

I never knew that a firmware can fix a mechanical problem.

Of course I'm not going to rely on the drive, but it's good that I can get some more use out of it.

For anyone with a F3 Samsung drive: »knowledge.seagate.com/articles/e···223631en


Dustyn
Premium
join:2003-02-26
Ontario, CAN
kudos:11

1 edit
That is remarkable at best that a firmware update corrected the drives mechanical issues... I'm skeptical... but if it worked, great! Since you can access it... I'd take the time to backup whatever else is remaining on the drive.
I'd be interested to see what SMART data could be retrieved off that drive!
»sourceforge.net/projects/smartmontools/
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Dogg
Premium
join:2003-06-11
Belleville, IL
reply to shdd
Have you retested the drive with the disk tools? If there are any errors, the drive is faulty.
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floydb1982

join:2004-08-25
Kent, WA

1 edit
reply to shdd
I have the GA-970A-UD3 Gigabyte brand motherboard and the BIOS can't see my 2TB hard drive or Blu-ray optical drive in my new iBUYPOWER custom built computer. Yet there both working just fine in Windows 7.


Dogg
Premium
join:2003-06-11
Belleville, IL
Reviews:
·Charter
reply to shdd
Depends on the controller configuration.

If the SATA controller(s) are in IDE mode, all connected devices will be listed during boot in the normal locations. If the SATA controller(s) are in AHCI mode, the devices are no longer listed.

In any event, they are working in Windows, so they are functional. However, I've seen several HDD's that are usable that are actually faulty and will throw an error code when tested.
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bevills1

join:2006-05-29
Reviews:
·Charter
reply to shdd
Recently I had similar problems with a Maxtor drive not recognized in BIOS 1 day when the system had been running about 8 hours, but the drive was recognized on startup the next day. I ran Sea Tools diagnostics, and the drive passed. I also tested the memory using Memtest86, and memory passed the tests, In my instance I suspect something may be overheating on the mobo since this is an old 1900 MHZ system. I suggest also testing memory if your problem recurs.

BTW a couple of years ago I also had some problems with a Seagate drive and even returned it under warranty for replacement only to have the problem recur. In that instance the Memtest 86 memory test found errors, and replacing the memory fixed the problem that time.

I suspect your problem isn't the drive since you got it recognized, and you might have some bad memory or possibly mobo issues if the problem does recur.


mmainprize

join:2001-12-06
Houghton Lake, MI
Reviews:
·Charter
reply to shdd
Your issues are not as strange as you might think.

A lot of drive are shipped with old buggy firmware and just about all MFG's have had a few models that required a firmware update to work correctly under some OS's. The Clicking sound is bad and should be looked into always. I have known of a few drives (Mainly laptop drives) that had firmware to fix the clicking noise of working drives. Many times the clicking drive will die a little later (click of death) »en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Click_of_death

Many times it is the drive trying to read a bad track (many times track 0) to get the basic drive info/boot code. Software can fix/move that track/info in some cases and make the drive work again but that is not always the case and many times the problem comes back later. If software is used to fix a drive it can not be trusted for long term use or important data any more.

If you every have a drive start to intermittently work or show up in BIOS you need to get the important data off it first before you run any diag on it. Many times the diag will kill the drive because it is a hard drive crash that has damaged the surface of the drive and the heads and it just spreads form the bad spot to the heads to other spots on the drive.

Kearnstd
Space Elf
Premium
join:2002-01-22
Mullica Hill, NJ
kudos:1
reply to shdd
I would say even if the firmware update saved it for now, I would highly suggest looking for a replacement drive or using an existing external drive or even a shared drive on a networked computer to get any mission/life critical data off that drive. So that if it does do a complete fail some evening you do not have to panic about say losing family photos, financial reports, iTunes collection, etc.
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