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Name Game
Premium
join:2002-07-07
Grand Rapids, MI
kudos:7

Apple Granted Patent: Disable Cameras According To Location


Recording, communicating during protests, political events could be restricted
Steve Watson

Sept 3, 2012

Apple was granted a patent last week that will enable it to wirelessly disable the camera on iphones in certain locations, sparking fears that such techniques could be used to prevent citizens from communicating with each other or taking video during protests or events such as political conventions and gatherings.
The camera phone has revolutionized the flow of information in the digital age. Any time a major event takes place, news networks and video websites are immediately inundated with footage and photographs from the scene.
That could all change in the future however, with a flick of a switch, according to U.S. Patent No. 8,254,902, published on Tuesday, titled, “Apparatus and methods for enforcement of policies upon a wireless device.”

»www.infowars.com/apple-granted-p···ocation/
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trparky
Apple... YUM
Premium,MVM
join:2000-05-24
Cleveland, OH
kudos:2

WTF! Seriously, WTF! How the hell did that get patented!?!?

This is so f'in obvious of an idea that it should've been shot down the moment it passed some guy's desk at the patent office!

So great... now we have another damn patent that Apple can bludgeon Android with.



Juggernaut
Irreverent or irrelevant?
Premium
join:2006-09-05
Kelowna, BC
kudos:2
reply to Name Game

I'm sure Apple will lose a lot of clients, once this gets out. Way to shoot yourself in the foot, morons. No concerts, club scenes, or other such stuff will be included, no doubt.

It reeks of the Big Brother aspect to boot. I'll never own a Apple product. Ever.
--
Better to have it and not need it, then need it and not have it.



Name Game
Premium
join:2002-07-07
Grand Rapids, MI
kudos:7
reply to Name Game

Among a bevy of patents awarded to Apple this week was one that would enable or disable certain features of a phone depending on its location. It could be useful, but it also raises serious questions about who really owns your device.

It's similar to an application made public in 2011 that would use a sensor in the phone to detect whether it was allowed to take pictures or make calls. The new patent relies on GPS, cell tower or Wi-Fi data to determine location, and then "changing one or more functional or operational aspects" of the device.

The suggestions for use are innocuous and practical: a movie theater that automatically sets phones to silent; a classroom that prevents outgoing calls; turning off Wi-Fi in a hospital. But it's not hard to imagine abuses of the system as well: it could be a useful tool for any oppressive regime, for instance, or be used to force the shutdown of phones at a protest — something that happened last year in San Francisco.

»www.nbcnews.com/technology/gadge···n-972677

"This policy enforcement capability is useful for a variety of reasons, including for example to disable noise and/or light emanating from wireless devices (such as at a movie theater), for preventing wireless devices from communicating with other wireless devices (such as in academic settings), and for forcing certain electronic devices to enter "sleep mode" when entering a sensitive area."

In case covert police or government operations require complete "blackout" conditions, Apple would help out by flicking the same switch.

The patent application also states that, as wireless devices, such as the iPhone, become ubiquitous, “[they] frequently disrupt meetings, the presentation of movies, religious ceremonies, weddings, funerals, academic lectures, and test-taking environments.”

Michael Zhang at Tech site Peta Pixel (highlighted by presstv.ir), believes that the future of amateur photography doesn’t look too bright, if Apple can just switch off your iPhone.

“If this type of technology became widely adopted and baked into cameras, photography could be prevented by simply setting a ‘geofence’ around a particular location, whether it's a movie theater, celebrity hangout spot, protest site, or the top secret rooms at 1 Infinite Loop, Cupertino, California.”

»news.softpedia.com/news/Apple-Gr···70.shtml
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state
stress magnet
Premium,Mod
join:2002-02-08
Purgatory
kudos:6
reply to Name Game

A patent doesn't necessarily mean implementation. But...

GPS off. Airplane mode on.

Done.



kdshapiro

join:2000-03-29
Eatontown, NJ
reply to Name Game

Think I'll stay with my BB for the foreseeable future.
--
Ken



rcdailey
Dragoonfly
Premium
join:2005-03-29
Rialto, CA
Reviews:
·Time Warner Cable

3 edits
reply to Name Game

An immediate application might be museums that restrict the use of cameras. Oh, wait, even better: casinos - no cameras working in casinos . . .

Then, someone will jail-break this feature and the question will become: Will jail-breaking your phone send you to jail?



kickass69

join:2002-06-03
Lake Hopatcong, NJ
reply to Name Game

I knew there was a reason I still use/have a film camera aside from high quality on top of never having and never will buy Apple hardware/software.



rcdailey
Dragoonfly
Premium
join:2005-03-29
Rialto, CA
Reviews:
·Time Warner Cable

Hang onto that camera, at least until they don't make film anymore. At that point, it will be a collector's item and worth more than you could get for it now.
--
It is easier for a camel to put on a bikini than an old man to thread a needle.



Ian
Premium
join:2002-06-18
ON
kudos:3
reply to kickass69

said by kickass69:

I knew there was a reason I still use/have a film camera aside from high quality on top of never having and never will buy Apple hardware/software.

Seems to me that purpose-built digital cameras that do not, and have not, ever had any networking capability whatsoever would fit the bill as well..

I'm not sure if this idea will amount to anything. At this stage it is merely yet another reason not to buy Apple products as well, if they were to implement it...
--
“Any claim that the root of a problem is simple should be treated the same as a claim that the root of a problem is Bigfoot. Simplicity and Bigfoot are found in the real world with about the same frequency.” – David Wong


DataDoc
My avatar looks like me, if I was 2D.
Premium
join:2000-05-14
Martinsburg, WV
Reviews:
·Suddenlink
reply to state

said by state:

A patent doesn't necessarily mean implementation. But...
GPS off. Airplane mode on.
Done.

And if they just turn it back on? If they can control a camera, they can control everything.
--
US Border Agent Brian Terry was disarmed by the very bureaucrats that armed his killers.
"People do things the president wants to do even though it's wrong, and the president can be wrong."


Kilroy
Premium,MVM
join:2002-11-21
Saint Paul, MN
reply to Name Game

This is the problem that I have:

said by Name Game:

It could be useful, but it also raises serious questions about who really owns your device.

If I paid for the device you have no business doing anything to it without my permission.

Yes, I see this as a great, though obvious, feature. But, I also see great opportunity for misuse.
--
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EUS
Kill cancer
Premium
join:2002-09-10
canada
Reviews:
·voip.ms

1 recommendation

reply to Juggernaut

I think you overestimate people's level of caring. Most people I see with any type of smart device can't bear to be without it for more than 10 mins.
IMHO any loss of sales going forward would be due to saturation.
--
~ Project Hope ~



Msradell
P.E.
Premium
join:2008-12-25
Louisville, KY
reply to trparky

said by trparky:

So great... now we have another damn patent that Apple can bludgeon Android with.

Actually it should be a huge plus for Android phones! People are going to be much more likely to buy a phone that the manufacturer can't control!


proprietary

@centurytel.net
reply to Kilroy

said by Kilroy:

This is the problem that I have:

said by Name Game:

It could be useful, but it also raises serious questions about who really owns your device.

If I paid for the device you have no business doing anything to it without my permission.

Yes, I see this as a great, though obvious, feature. But, I also see great opportunity for misuse.

You paid for the device per say but its my proprietary software so if I as the provider want to update my software you shouldn't have control over it.

Proprietary is not freedom until you learn this you will be forced to update.


mackey
Premium
join:2007-08-20
kudos:12

1 recommendation

reply to Kilroy

said by Kilroy:

If I paid for the device you have no business doing anything to it without my permission.

They DO have your permission to do whatever they want. It's right there in the Terms of Service and License Agreement you agreed to by buying and using their device or service.

/M


StuartMW
Who Is John Galt?
Premium
join:2000-08-06
Galt's Gulch
kudos:2

2 recommendations

+1

But who reads their TOS?



EGeezer
zichrona livracha
Premium
join:2002-08-04
Midwest
kudos:8
reply to Name Game

Looks like it's time for these -

»www.spytechs.com/body-worn-camera.htm



StuartMW
Who Is John Galt?
Premium
join:2000-08-06
Galt's Gulch
kudos:2

Or

»Re: Apple Granted Patent: Disable Cameras According To Location

Harder to hack film
--
Don't feed trolls--it only makes them grow!



KrK
Heavy Artillery For The Little Guy
Premium
join:2000-01-17
Tulsa, OK
reply to Name Game

OMG Another one of these patents?

FFS. Classic example of patenting an obvious idea but one that opens so many cans of worms that nobody felt anyone would actually do it.

Cue Apple.

Yes, totally fails obviousness test, and is a bad idea to boot.
--
"Fascism should more properly be called corporatism because it is the merger of state and corporate power." -- Benito Mussolini



KrK
Heavy Artillery For The Little Guy
Premium
join:2000-01-17
Tulsa, OK
reply to trparky

Obviously I should now file for the exact same patent but add the following words:

"while in a vehicle or other transportation apparatus."

That means I would have the patent on the idea of remote shutdown of vehicles when in certain areas or when the authorities say so.
--
"Fascism should more properly be called corporatism because it is the merger of state and corporate power." -- Benito Mussolini



StuartMW
Who Is John Galt?
Premium
join:2000-08-06
Galt's Gulch
kudos:2

said by KrK:

That means I would have the patent on the idea of remote shutdown of vehicles when in certain areas or when the authorities say so.

I believe cops have already shutdown vehicles via OnStar or similar services.

I will not own a vehicle equipped with one, with totally electronic (key-less) ignitions etc.
--
Don't feed trolls--it only makes them grow!


SparkChaser
Premium
join:2000-06-06
Downingtown, PA
kudos:3

Just going to mention GM Onstar has 500 patents. You're a day late ..



StuartMW
Who Is John Galt?
Premium
join:2000-08-06
Galt's Gulch
kudos:2

said by SparkChaser:

You're a day late ..

And a dollar short?
--
Don't feed trolls--it only makes them grow!


StuartMW
Who Is John Galt?
Premium
join:2000-08-06
Galt's Gulch
kudos:2
reply to KrK

Here's some more info on OnStar.

quote:
According to the New York Times, OnStar notified customers of changes in the company's policies. Two things of note are: when you cancel your service, communication will no longer be shut down completely; plus, OnStar now reserves the right to share your data with any third-party it chooses.

The new terms and conditions state whether enrolled or not, "OnStar will maintain the two-way connection to your Vehicle...for an indefinite period of time to be determined by OnStar at our sole discretion."

The data OnStar collects includes vehicle identification number (VIN), make, model, year, date of purchase, seat belt usage and speed.

»www.cbsnews.com/8301-501465_162-···465.html

Sound familiar? The point is that many wireless services (Cell phone, OnStar etc) have similar ToS's.
--
Don't feed trolls--it only makes them grow!


DrStrange
Technically feasible
Premium
join:2001-07-23
West Hartford, CT
kudos:1
reply to Name Game

I'm glad I have the Samsung version of that phone.

Back to actual cameras and two-way radios, I guess.



Mike
Premium,Mod
join:2000-09-17
Pittsburgh, PA
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Verizon FiOS
reply to Name Game

A patent doesn't necessarily mean implementation.
A patent doesn't necessarily mean implementation.
A patent doesn't necessarily mean implementation.
A patent doesn't necessarily mean implementation.
--
"If something about the human body disgusts you, complain to the manufacturer" - Lenny Bruce
What this country needs is a good five dollar plasma weapon.


OZO
Premium
join:2003-01-17
kudos:2

1 recommendation

reply to Name Game

If you try to see a bigger picture, it's not about the Apple. Apple here is just one of the pillars, that makes a base for Corporate America. Big corporations (like Apple or Microsoft or others) work for government and the government works for them. And both are interested in a total control over population (The People). If you able to see that, there is nothing new in granting this particular patent. It's just one step in the direction of gaining total control, nothing less and nothing more. And, as usual, it's presented as benefiting The People, of course. No more disturbance in theaters... And if you're not convinced yet, they will find an example, where it protects our children too... Don't worry, be happy. That's what all we need. Right?

Today it's Apple, tomorrow it will be another corporation. For example, Microsoft has registered similar (by intention) patents. Remember "Legal Intercept" 20110153809? Or other monitoring you patents ("Monitoring group activities" 20070300174, "Organizational behavior monitoring analysis and influence" 20110276369, "Social Context Monitor" 20070156522) and many, many others... This time it's about shutting down ability to document some presumably political events, tomorrow smartphone apps will track users even when shut down. It's just yet another step in that direction.

The main problem is - vast majority of people in the US can't see the forest behind a tree... And if someone would try to tell them to open eyes, take a look and see by yourself, they will immediately label those folks as "conspiracy theorists" (as they were always taught to). God bless stupidity of America...
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Keep it simple, it'll become complex by itself...



StuartMW
Who Is John Galt?
Premium
join:2000-08-06
Galt's Gulch
kudos:2

said by OZO:

The main problem is - vast majority of people in the US can't see the forest behind a tree... And if someone would try to tell them to open eyes, take a look and see by yourself, they will immediately label those folks as "conspiracy theorists"...

+10
--
Don't feed trolls--it only makes them grow!


FF4m3

@bhn.net
reply to OZO

Well said.