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Craiger

join:2012-07-05
Chesterfield, MO

Will DirecTV Ever Switch To Ethernet?

Anyone think DirecTV will switch to ethernet for installing their boxes? Could the dishes have ethernet ports along with the multiswitch? Or is that even possible?



DJ
Premium
join:2001-06-13
Opelika, AL
kudos:1

Plain and simple, coax has tons more bandwidth and better shielding against outside rf interference than ethernet.



ilikeme
I live in a van down by the river.
Premium
join:2002-08-27
Sugar Land, TX
kudos:1
reply to Craiger

Nope. They already have the Ethernet adapter that sends it over the coax. Trying to send a satellite signal over Ethernet would not work well at all.



cypherstream
Premium,MVM
join:2004-12-02
Reading, PA
kudos:3
reply to Craiger

SWM/DECA is already working great. Plus theres more coax already run in homes vs. ethernet. Makes sense if its working good and it's already there, use it.

You can use the DECA adapters to bridge ethernet to coax and use existing wiring to network two computers in different parts of the house. You can take the output of a DECA adapter and run it into a small 5 port switch and get things like a gaming system, connected TV or Blue Ray Player, or a HTPC or connected A/V receiver all connected to the lan.



egnlsn
Premium
join:2003-09-26
Salt Lake City, UT
reply to Craiger

I think the OP was referring to DirecTV utilizing the internet instead of satellite to deliver ALL of their content (not just VOD) to their subs.

That is a definite NO.
--
CIAO!



DrDrew
That others may surf
Premium
join:2009-01-28
SoCal
kudos:15

2 edits

You sure about that? Check out DirecTV TVEverywhere:
»www.directv.com/DTVAPP/content/t···erywhere


88615298
Premium
join:2004-07-28
West Tenness

said by DrDrew:

You sure about that? Check out DirecTV TVEverywhere:
Http://www.directv.com/DTVAPP/content/technology/directv_everywhere

A) none of that is LIVE

B) requires and actual internet connection. Considering how many RURAL customers DirecTV has I'm not sure how feasible streaming their content over the internet is.

C) Most with internet have caps. most people will only be able to stream 5 hours day max. And that going by a bitrate near 5 Mbps. To offer something close to DirecTv current HD you'll need to have at least 8 Mbps. Now you talking maybe 3 hours a day. Once again not practical


RR Conductor
NWP RR Inc.,serving NW CA
Premium
join:2002-04-02
Redwood Valley, CA
kudos:1

I'm rural and have HSI from Comcast, I have the Blast Tier (25/4, 30/6 with Powerboost).



88615298
Premium
join:2004-07-28
West Tenness

said by RR Conductor:

I'm rural and have HSI from Comcast, I have the Blast Tier (25/4, 30/6 with Powerboost).

Good for you. I can assure you MILLIONS of rural people do NOT have HSI form anyone. I know many right in the county where I live. They have satellite TV because it's the only choice. So offering TV via stream is NOT an option for them.

Also helps your town has a population density of 630 people per square mile.


cypherstream
Premium,MVM
join:2004-12-02
Reading, PA
kudos:3
reply to Craiger

There's a good handful of live channels available for streaming to the iPad.

I think it would be a nice feature if the HRxx set top box could use these live IP video feeds if there was bad rain fade. At least you could still watch those handful of channels they are streaming.

I'm just not sure the CPU can handle streaming in current DVR's because even with a fast connection, VOD doesn't just "play" when you click on it (Like Netflix or Cable VOD). It has to download first. So you download VOD, exit, go into the playlist and then can start playing when enough of it is downloaded. This tells me either 2 things...
1- The set top box cannot stream or is not optimized for streaming (yet).
2- DirecTV's VOD infrastructure is not fully on a CDN optimized for streaming (Like Netflix or Amazon Prime). Served from their own datacenter, downloads appeared capped about 4-5mbps, even if you have a 30mbps internet connection.

An internet based DirecTV package would be great for apartment dwellers with no feasible access to a southern sky for a dish... but then again those pesky caps ISP's are introducing really ruin that possibility. It's a shame because it would be a nice value service for those who want it but can't due to physical limitations. Unless in like 20 years they figure out a way to transmit the signal like SiriusXM where you can use a silver dollar sized antenna placed anywhere outside... some of these apartment dwellers and high rise tenants are stuck with Cable. Even then I think we'd see IPTV long before technology evolves to silver dollar sized antenna's. If not wired IPTV, maybe over LTE with switched digital video multicast.



DarkLogix
Texan and Proud
Premium
join:2008-10-23
Baytown, TX
kudos:3

1 edit
reply to cypherstream

said by cypherstream:

SWM/DECA is already working great. Plus theres more coax already run in homes vs. ethernet. Makes sense if its working good and it's already there, use it.

You can use the DECA adapters to bridge ethernet to coax and use existing wiring to network two computers in different parts of the house. You can take the output of a DECA adapter and run it into a small 5 port switch and get things like a gaming system, connected TV or Blue Ray Player, or a HTPC or connected A/V receiver all connected to the lan.

Be aware of the 16 deca max per segment.
From my reading it sounds that Deca uses a TDMA collision avoidance (which while nice and better than csma/cd which Ethernet normally uses) though not as good as a full on Ethernet switch.

also so far Deca is only 100Mbit not gig yet.


DrDrew
That others may surf
Premium
join:2009-01-28
SoCal
kudos:15

4 edits
reply to 88615298

said by 88615298:

A) none of that is LIVE

B) requires and actual internet connection. Considering how many RURAL customers DirecTV has I'm not sure how feasible streaming their content over the internet is.

C) Most with internet have caps. most people will only be able to stream 5 hours day max. And that going by a bitrate near 5 Mbps. To offer something close to DirecTv current HD you'll need to have at least 8 Mbps. Now you talking maybe 3 hours a day. Once again not practical

...

I can assure you MILLIONS of rural people do NOT have HSI form anyone. I know many right in the county where I live. They have satellite TV because it's the only choice. So offering TV via stream is NOT an option for them.

Sure it's not an option for them, but it's an option for MILLIONS (BILLIONS?) of others.

There are many, many companies offering IPTV/streaming video (Netflix, Amazon, Hulu, Vimeo, Google, Apple, TWC, Comcast, Cox, Dish, Verizon, AT&T, Virgin, Sky Digital, etc.), a growing percentage is live. Lack of broadband to those rural customers you're concerned with isn't stopping anyone. 10 years ago, probably 5% had the bandwidth in the U.S. to stream video reliably, now it's more than 70%. If anything the expansion of IPTV services is one reason behind a bigger push for rural broadband expansion.

IPTV's availability will just expand as the distribution system becomes more standardized, accepted, and in demand. It won't replace satellite distribution everywhere, but it can certainly supplement it and supplant in in many situations.

People want more competition between video providers and the possibility of ala carte, this can provide both.
--
If it's important, back it up... twice. Even 99.999% availability isn't enough sometimes.


RR Conductor
NWP RR Inc.,serving NW CA
Premium
join:2002-04-02
Redwood Valley, CA
kudos:1

1 edit
reply to 88615298

said by 88615298:

said by RR Conductor:

I'm rural and have HSI from Comcast, I have the Blast Tier (25/4, 30/6 with Powerboost).

Good for you. I can assure you MILLIONS of rural people do NOT have HSI form anyone. I know many right in the county where I live. They have satellite TV because it's the only choice. So offering TV via stream is NOT an option for them.

Also helps your town has a population density of 630 people per square mile.

The same with my county of Mendocino, this is a VERY rural county, and fairly poor. My "Town" of Redwood Valley actually isn't a town, it's an unincorporated area (Census Designated Area, CDA) consisting mostly of vineyards, wineries, ranches and farms, there are only 4 incorporated towns in Mendocino County (Ukiah, Willits, Fort Bragg, Point Arena). You have a VERY incorrect idea of our area

»www.visitmendocino.com

Edit-As for the 630 people per square mile, well, for most of Redwood Valley that is NOT correct, Wiki needs to fix that article.
--
»www.amtrak.com
»www.freightrailworks.org
»www.isu.edu
»www.nwprr.net
»www.amtrakcalifornia.com
»www.cahighspeedrail.gov


thegeek
Premium
join:2008-02-21
right here
kudos:2
reply to cypherstream

said by cypherstream:

You can use the DECA adapters to bridge ethernet to coax and use existing wiring to network two computers in different parts of the house. You can take the output of a DECA adapter and run it into a small 5 port switch and get things like a gaming system, connected TV or Blue Ray Player, or a HTPC or connected A/V receiver all connected to the lan.

This is off topic but it got me thinking. I have a long house and no matter where I put my wireless access point I can't cover the entire house. But I could with two. Could I use a DECA adapter to connect a second access point on the other end of the house? If so this would finally get me the wifi coverage I want in my kitchen, dining room, and pool area.

westdc

join:2009-01-25
Amissville, VA
kudos:1

yes