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norwegian
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reply to Name Game

Re: Australia won't back away from data retention plan

AFP denies seeking URLs for data-retention plans

The Australian Federal Police (AFP) has defined the sort of "non-content" communications data that it would like internet service providers (ISPs) to retain for up to two years, and has denied suggestions that web-browsing history would be included.

The federal government has proposed, as part of a suite of suggested modifications to telecommunications-interception legislation, that ISPs be required to retain customer "metadata" for up to two years. This metadata would be "non-content" communications data, according to law-enforcement agencies.

.......more at link.

How far would the info (IP address) go if the whole world were not involved in this storage. Proxies. Where would that leave us?

And what would a URL do that the IP address would not? Certainly having the IP would help avoid issues with DNS poisoning being the infect vector, and would allow more positive resolution that will still ultimately provide a URL anyway, so how does that provide an argument in the defense of the laws requested?
--
The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing - Edmund Burke



norwegian
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reply to Name Game
Thought it worth posting a few updates and comments to keep you updated:

»www.zdnet.com/un-sides-with-law- ··· 0006274/

UN sides with law enforcement over data retention
Summary: The United Nations has picked a side when it comes to the ongoing debate over data-retention legislation, echoing sentiments by law-enforcement organisations that a retention scheme is necessary.

More at link

-------------------

»www.activistpost.com/2012/10/un- ··· net.html

UN calls for worldwide internet surveillance and data retention in the name of fighting terrorism

The manufactured threat of terrorism has once again been used to push what would otherwise be unthinkable. In this case, the United Nations is exploiting the irrational fear of terrorism to justify international internet surveillance.

In a new 148-page UN report released at a conference in Vienna entitled “The Use of the Internet for Terrorist Purposes” the UN claimed that the lack of an “internationally agreed framework for retention of data” is problematic along with open wireless internet networks in public places.

The UN claims that terrorists are utilizing social networking sites like Facebook, Twitter and YouTube to spread what they call “propaganda.” This perspective is somewhat similar to that presented by groups like the Homeland Security Policy Institute in claiming that a major threat is the “spread of the [terrorist] entity’s narrative.”

--
The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing - Edmund Burke



norwegian
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reply to Name Game
»apo.org.au/research/telecommunic ··· overview

Telecommunications data retention - an overview

24 October 2012This background note outlines the types of communications data generated by use of the Internet, email and phones, why law enforcement agencies want it retained, and what existing access law enforcement agencies have to such data.

More obviously if you read on........
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The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing - Edmund Burke



norwegian
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reply to Name Game
»www.itnews.com.au/News/320516,da ··· law.aspx

Data retention runs counter to national privacy law

Opinion: Has the Government proposed contradicting reforms?

The Federal Government’s proposed data retention laws run counter to the spirit and letter of the national privacy principles.

If enacted, the data retention laws will make it mandatory for all Australian telcos and ISPs to store the non-content usage records of all individuals for up to two years without the consent of the individuals involved.
But they appear to contradict the Privacy Amendment (Enhancing Privacy Protection) Bill 2012, which, if passed, will prohibit the use of all personal information for direct marketing, unless exemptions apply.
The proposed privacy amendments are consistent with the "consent-based" approach that generally underpins Western thinking about privacy.

By contrast, the national security reform proposals seek to significantly extend government's surveillance powers.


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The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing - Edmund Burke



Blackbird
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said by norwegian:

»www.itnews.com.au/News/320516,da ··· law.aspx

Data retention runs counter to national privacy law

Opinion: Has the Government proposed contradicting reforms?...

Which, in the end, is always the universal crux of the matter: national security versus privacy... the leadership's need to "know" versus the people's desire to keep secrets. Since the perpetual ambition of those in power is to achieve more power (to better control events and people and to further their hold on power), the position of government will always tend toward the security side of things. That's where people are most vulnerable to tolerating the loss of their privacy and independence, since fear is such a powerful human drive. However, it's a bit unusual to see two simultaneous initiatives within a national dialogue so directly at cross purposes. Hopefully a majority of Australians will see the contradiction and compel their elected government leaders to come down on the side of privacy... but that's not how I'd bet.
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"Is life so dear, or peace so sweet, as to be purchased at the price of chains and slavery? Forbid it, Almighty God!" -- P.Henry, 1775


norwegian
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That's where you wonder just how far reaching it all ends up.

Some countries already have data retention laws which mandate the retention of data for a certain period of time, regardless of any criminal activity.

While CNET notes, “Europe, but not the U.S. or most other nations, has enacted a mandatory data-retention law,” in reality the U.S does indeed retain huge amounts of data on Americans without any link to criminal or terrorist activity.

This is evidenced by the rules adopted by the National Counterterrorism Center which “allow private data on Americans to be held when there is no suspicion of them being tied to terrorism for a whopping five years.”

Seems like there are concerns for other regions, and I remember there was discussion here recently for the US as well, it was just before this topic, but missed the link to it in a quick search of the forum.

No one wants the general population, friends, relatives, neighbors, etc to be 'taken down' but to justify taking full control and think it does clean up - certainly corrupted power can be more damaging than the initial trip or event that sets in motion these 'updated rules'; then you only have to obtain one exception and it all unfolds in it's glory.

There is a lot to be said for "KISS"
Keep it simple silly.
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The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing - Edmund Burke



StuartMW
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reply to Blackbird
said by Blackbird:

Hopefully a majority of Australians will see the contradiction and compel their elected government leaders to come down on the side of privacy... but that's not how I'd bet.

I doubt it. My bet is that Aussies, like Americans, mostly fall in the "I've nothing to hide just keep me safe" crowd and therefore don't care. They're too busy on Facebook/Twitter/etc to notice anyway.

I've said this before but I just live with the fact that everything I do on the internet is monitored. I don't believe any gummint that says they're not doing it. I don't like it but there's nothing I can do about it.

But as we all suspect this captured data can be used against you.

»NO-FLY LIST Strands man on Island in Hawaii

The "we're only looking for terrorists" is pure BS. This is "Big Brother" pure and simple.
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antdude
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I doubt it. My bet is that Aussies, like Americans, mostly fall in the "I've nothing to hide just keep me safe" crowd and therefore don't care. They're too busy on Facebook/Twitter/etc to notice anyway.

I've said this before but I just live with the fact that everything I do on the internet is monitored. I don't believe any gummint that says they're not doing it. I don't like it but there's nothing I can do about it.

But as we all suspect this captured data can be used against you.

»NO-FLY LIST Strands man on Island in Hawaii

The "we're only looking for terrorists" is pure BS. This is "Big Brother" pure and simple.

Most humans are pretty much like that.
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Ant @ AQFL.net and AntFarm.ma.cx. Please do not IM/e-mail me for technical support. Use this forum or better, »community.norton.com ! Disclaimer: The views expressed in this posting are mine, and do not necessarily reflect the views of my employer.


ashrc4
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reply to Name Game
My reasoning behind finding the new law acceptable goes along the lines of what we have grown to expect from telephone laws.
Records are kept for home phone line rental the same as for communication for net use. It makes sense.
You are still required to get a warrant to access.
The irony in all this is that company's can flout these by many approaches and spy at will.

»Re: Skype Encryption when sending and receiving IM messages?

One such example where wiretap laws aren't equal.
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