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Jobbie
Keep It Simple
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join:2010-08-24
Mexico
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Ubisoft Scrapping Always-On DRM For PC Games

Excelent news for us gamers and hopefully increase of business on Ubi side.

For the last few years, Ubisoft's attempts at battling piracy have been something of a running punchline, seeming to achieve little but annoy the company's actual paying customers.

Looks like all the protests have finally sunk in, because the publisher has told Rock, Paper, Shotgun it'll be rolling back most of its most offensive methods.

Firstly, the controversial "always on" DRM is gone, and bizarrely, has apparently been missing from new releases for some time.

Also gone is the limit on the number of times a product can be activated, as well as the limit on the number of PCs a game can be activated on.

All you'll need to do now is activate a new game once, online, and that'll be that.

It's a welcome move from the publisher. Now, if it can just work on its customary PC version delays, they might actually get in PC gamer's good books!

UPDATE - Since the time of original posting RPS has since updated with a second story, a full-length interview about Ubisoft's decision. It's great reading.



»kotaku.com/5940535/ubisoft-gives ··· d-pc-drm

Another link:

»www.rockpapershotgun.com/2012/09 ··· c-games/
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Judge a man by the trials of his shield, not the empty reaping of his sword.


Jobbie
Keep It Simple
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join:2010-08-24
Mexico
kudos:5
In an interview on RPS today, Ubisoft tells us that they will no longer use their controversial always-on DRM. In fact, they quietly scrapped it months ago, but havent made that official until now. In what is a really remarkable turnaround, the publisher pledges that from now on they will only require a single online activation after installing, with no activation limits, nor limits on how many PCs it may be activated.

Ubisofts worldwide director for online games, Stephanie Perotti, explained that always-on has actually been gone for quite a while.

We have listened to feedback, and since June last year our policy for all of PC games is that we only require a one-time online activation when you first install the game, and from then you are free to play the game offline.

Ubisofts DRM had previously meant that you could not launch games without an internet connection, and if your connection dropped at any point the game you were playing would instantly stop, often losing progress you may have made. It was widely derided, and the bane of many gamers, but Ubisoft seemed defiant in response. Until now. Clarifying the new position, Perotti summarises it, using Assassins Creed III as an example:

Whenever you want to reach any online service, multiplayer, you will have to be connected, and obviously for online games you will also need to be online to play. But if you want to enjoy Assassins Creed III single player, you will be able to do that without being connected. And you will be able to activate the game on as many machines as you want.

In the rest of the interview, coming up in a couple of hours, we discuss Ubisofts plans to decrease delays for PC releases, try to find out why the publisher doesnt publish the numbers behind its claims about piracy, and which of the statements theyve made in recent years that they now find unfortunate.

»www.rockpapershotgun.com/2012/09 ··· terview/
--
Judge a man by the trials of his shield, not the empty reaping of his sword.


Krisnatharok
Caveat Emptor
Premium
join:2009-02-11
Earth Orbit
kudos:12
reply to Jobbie
owned

I might buy the newest AC games now...


TigerLord
For Value Received
Premium,Mod
join:2002-06-09
Canada
kudos:8
reply to Jobbie
THANK YOU UBI!

I will happily pay for your games now.


C0deZer0
Oc'D To Rhythm And Police
Premium
join:2001-10-03
Tempe, AZ
reply to Jobbie
Now why didn't they decide on this sooner?

At least now I can look forward to getting some of these games on PC. Ubi has been making some interesting stuff lately.
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Because, f*ck Sony