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lemonade

join:2003-12-13
Los Angeles, CA

Free land and electricity?

Wow, i didn't know Google get free land and electricity.
Oh well, no matter what I see Google as a lesser of evils


Austinloop

join:2001-08-19
Austin, TX
kudos:1

It is quite common for telecommunications companies to get "free" space in a building and "free" electricity, be it in a government building, or in a private sector location, such as an office building. The reasoning being that the provisioning of fiber facilities, at least in the private sector location is that the fiber adds value to the building.


majortom1029

join:2006-10-19
Lindenhurst, NY
kudos:1

The problem is they often do it thinking they have permission since its a public building. Here in work in 200 verizon came in without asking anybody and installed a fiber line to their CO and installed a CO box so they can run new lines for the village to here instead of their CO. I started and had the worst time trying to find anybody at Verizon to figure out what the box does.

I had one verizon tech tell me to unplug it. So I did .nobody from verizon figured out it was unplugged . since nobody at verizon claimed it even after me going all the way up we chucked it.

They never asked permission to install it here at the library. They figured they could get away with the free power and space since it was a public building.

I wouldnt doubt verizon and google are doing this all over and nobody has the knowledge to ask why is this here.


Austinloop

join:2001-08-19
Austin, TX
kudos:1

1 recommendation

Interesting. However all of the government and private building installations that I ever participated in had building officials and customers present and entrance facilities for the fiber and power requirements, including the type of electrical plugs were discussed, and agreed to, or the installation proceeded no further.

In short, in some 20 years of dealing with customer premise (both government and private) I have never seen an example such as you posted.


iansltx

join:2007-02-19
Austin, TX
kudos:2
Reviews:
·Time Warner Cable
·Verizon Online DSL
·Comcast
reply to lemonade

Particularly since it appears as though the gear being installed is PON equipment (Passive Optical Network). Which doesn't take much space or power. Maybe a rack per building and a kilowatt of electricity, if that. It's not as if Google is asking to run a server farm at KC's expense.


axus

join:2001-06-18
Washington, DC
reply to Austinloop

I think it also opens up Google Fiber to providing wholesale access to new companies that wish to resell their service, similar to how DSL was able to be resold due to telco subsidies. More competition sounds good.


tmc8080

join:2004-04-24
Brooklyn, NY
Reviews:
·ooma
·Optimum Online
·Verizon FiOS
reply to lemonade

said by lemonade:

Wow, i didn't know Google get free land and electricity.
Oh well, no matter what I see Google as a lesser of evils

The two Kansas Cities knew what they were getting themselves into (and obligated to subsidize) just to get google fiber.. Think of it as a minor bidding war to win the opportunity and this is a small price to pay to put the telco & cableco on some major incumbent punishment. Hopefully in this "contract" if google pulls out, I hope the existing infrastructure would be able to be "bought" on the cheap by the cities and run it as full muni, as I doubt they would dismantle the infrastructure once "IN-PLACE"...

Let's see what happens in NOVEMBER first.. then you can almost predict the future..


battleop

join:2005-09-28
00000
reply to Austinloop

It's quite the opposite. It's more common that the building owner wants to charge you for space and electricity if you can even get in to begin with.

I was once a landlord before I got in to telecom when everyone was beating on your door to bring fiber into your building. Just like anyone else they had to sign a lease pay some rent to get to the tenants.
--
I do not, have not, and will not work for AT&T/Comcast/Verizon/Charter or similar sized company.


Chubbysumo

join:2009-12-01
Superior, WI
Reviews:
·Charter
reply to Austinloop

me neither, after quite a few years working with governments(local and state), any ISP coming into a building(or anything at that), every little detail had to be discussed, from the hardware they were installing(serials and models) or would need so the building could keep track of it(if it gets stolen, which happens more often than you think in public buildings), and even down to exactly, to the foot, where it was going, and what kind of power requirements and plugs it would need. Then, once everything that was needed was discussed, each department would have to notified of the install, and where it was(so it could be added to building maintenance maps), and then each department would have to show up to put in what they needed to put in(ie. electrical would put in an outlet with a locking plug, networking would come and run the appropriate cables to it to hook into their existing network, general maintenece would come and drill a hole thru the wall or floor or wherever and put a fish cable thru for the installer, and then the installer would be the last step, and would just make the cable run and plug it into the wall and verify its getting internet, and then networking would come and hook it to their network. its an overly complex system, and an installer would not be allowed into many of the places of the building they would need access to without an escort of some kind, and without everyone knowing exactly what was happening long beforehand. In gov't stuff, installers just dont "show up" and put something in, every little thing has to be approved and set up ahead of time, and someone else is usually involved. I know this process better than most, since I helped get FTTP into our local libraries, and the steps needed were quite obnoxious, and very tech restricting. Took me 3 months to get the fiber from the ground in front to getting the modem connected to the libraries internal network for 1 building. I did 3 buildings, and it was over a year long process. Most cities have fiber for business users and such "downtown", and here is no different. If you have the cash, charter, and even centurylink will install FTTH, but its expensive service.


Austinloop

join:2001-08-19
Austin, TX
kudos:1
reply to battleop

Not, really in my experience. We usually dealt directly with the end user and let them handle the landlord. It usually involved the end user discussing the lease. We only had one or two cases of property owner wanting pay and that building didn't get service. We provided basic copper service to the building and that was that.



battleop

join:2005-09-28
00000

If you want to drop fiber and equipment to take the building OnNET then they want money. IF you are doing simple copper cross connects they don't seem to care.
--
I do not, have not, and will not work for AT&T/Comcast/Verizon/Charter or similar sized company.



its me

@verizon.net
reply to majortom1029

Hello...these public buildings (libraries, govt offices, the school PTA office) are wired with FREE service (VZ or Google) so the least they could do is foot the the minimal bill for the juice to run the stuff.

BTW I don't the VZ or Google collocate in govt/muni bldgs


InvalidError

join:2008-02-03
kudos:5
reply to axus

said by axus:

I think it also opens up Google Fiber to providing wholesale access to new companies

One problem with that: you need an awfully large company with extensive pre-existing peering arrangements to afford offering unmetered 1Gbps for $70/month.

I doubt "Mom&Pop" ISPs could afford to try competing against Google's own internet on Google's infrastructure since their internet transit costs would be several times higher (likely more than an order of magnitude) than Google's.


LSURULES

@lusfiber.net
reply to iansltx

said by iansltx:

Particularly since it appears as though the gear being installed is PON equipment (Passive Optical Network). Which doesn't take much space or power. Maybe a rack per building and a kilowatt of electricity, if that. It's not as if Google is asking to run a server farm at KC's expense.

What do you think a Central Office location consist of? They are going to be housing many servers, transport, & many many video related devices in this location.


LSURULES

@lusfiber.net
reply to Austinloop

While I agree it is common to get free space in commercial buildings being served by a provider, it is absolutely not common to get free space in a Central Office environment. CoLocation cost do apply and at a premium for both space and power in most locations. If you were to co-locate in a ILEC central office you could expect to pay a hefty price as a provider.