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ArrayList
netbus developer
Premium
join:2005-03-19
Evanston, IL

the report defines an HD stream as 2 Mbps

I'd be curious to see what a real HD stream would use.


Bob4
Account deleted

join:2012-07-22
New Jersey

8 Mbps



88615298
Premium
join:2004-07-28
West Tenness

1 recommendation

reply to ArrayList

Netflix uses around 5 Mbps



88615298
Premium
join:2004-07-28
West Tenness
reply to Bob4

said by Bob4:

8 Mbps

Only Vudu actually uses bitrates that high and you'll pay extra for that too.


fifty nine

join:2002-09-25
Sussex, NJ
kudos:2
reply to ArrayList

said by ArrayList:

I'd be curious to see what a real HD stream would use.

It depends on the codec and compression.

19MBps is the maximum that broadcast HDTV can use and they use a less efficient codec (MPEG2). Blu-ray Disc (BD) can use more than that. Streaming tends to use less because of home internet connections typically being lower bandwidth. It is a chicken and egg scenario.

Bob4
Account deleted

join:2012-07-22
New Jersey
reply to 88615298

I guess I was approaching it from the standpoint of: What connection speed is required to be able to receive any true HD stream?


Sukunai
Premium
join:2008-05-07
kudos:1
reply to ArrayList

Looking at the map it is hardly shocking the states that have the least broadband correspond nicely with Canada's northern wilderness.

Hardly shocking eh. Why would there be a lot of broadband in places where there is a lot of no one around.


Wilsdom

join:2009-08-06
reply to ArrayList

200mb/s



Paulg
Displaced Yooper
Premium
join:2004-03-15
Neenah, WI
kudos:1
reply to Sukunai

Uh, what? I was unaware that any U.S. state was part of the Canadian "northern wilderness."


Bob4
Account deleted

join:2012-07-22
New Jersey
Reviews:
·Optimum Online

said by Paulg:

Uh, what? I was unaware that any U.S. state was part of the Canadian "northern wilderness."

Alaska?


MovieLover76

join:2009-09-11
kudos:1
reply to ArrayList

Even netflix is 5Mbps for HD, a 2 mbps "HD Stream" isn't even close to HD


mr2
Premium
join:2002-08-07
Cabin John, MD
reply to ArrayList

Bluray isn't perfect, but it is a valid reference point for semi-high-quality 1080p24 HD video.

Put your Bluray player into info/diag mode, play a bluray movie and watch the data rate. A simple movie like Blazing Saddles is encoded VC-1 (very compact, similar to h.264/Mpeg4-part10). It shows sustained data rate of 20 to 24Mbps, with peaks to 40.

Imagine a movie containing scenes with high entropy (some of the exciting moments in Event Horizon?).

There's no magic. Lossy encoding throws away information. If you want high quality, you pay the price: high data rate. Cable&Sat providers transmit low BW because it saves them money on distribution and it relegates any pirated copies to inferior quality.

Now imagine the future: 48 frame per second content. 4K video. Data rates SHOULD go up to maintain fidelity. Only last-mile systems with very small node sizes (and lots of aggregate capacity), such as XGPON or point-to-point FTTH will be able to service lots of viewers streaming OTT video at very high data rates. Coaxial-based providers (cable companies) are just stalling, trying to delay rebuilding their OSP. (Deferring an expense puts more money in their executive bonus checks.)



ArrayList
netbus developer
Premium
join:2005-03-19
Evanston, IL
reply to fifty nine

I don't consider something with compression as HD



gjrhine

join:2001-12-12
Pawleys Island, SC

Even all HD is compressed.


Bob4
Account deleted

join:2012-07-22
New Jersey

Uncompressed would be 1200 Mbps (1.2 Gbps). So all HD is compressed.



mgraves1
Premium
join:2004-04-05
Houston, TX

said by Bob4:

Uncompressed would be 1200 Mbps (1.2 Gbps). So all HD is compressed.

Actually, SMPTE 292M specifies 1.485 Gbps as the nominal data rate for uncompressed HD.

It gets confusing in transmission because the channel usually receives several streams multiplexed together, often at least 1 HD and 1-2 SD streams, into that bandwidth.

Uncompressed HD video is very pretty, but not often seen in the wild.
--
Michael Graves
Houston TX
»www.mgraves.org

Sukunai
Premium
join:2008-05-07
kudos:1
Reviews:
·ELECTRONICBOX
·TekSavvy DSL
reply to Paulg

said by Paulg:

Uh, what? I was unaware that any U.S. state was part of the Canadian "northern wilderness."

What part of correspond was too complicated?


Anonymous_
Anonymous
Premium
join:2004-06-21
127.0.0.1
kudos:2
Reviews:
·Time Warner Cable
reply to fifty nine

said by fifty nine:

said by ArrayList:

I'd be curious to see what a real HD stream would use.

It depends on the codec and compression.

19MBps is the maximum that broadcast HDTV can use and they use a less efficient codec (MPEG2). Blu-ray Disc (BD) can use more than that. Streaming tends to use less because of home internet connections typically being lower bandwidth. It is a chicken and egg scenario.

I am sure he wanted to know the uncompressed rate
10-bit Uncompressed HD - 1080i at 59.94 fps 155 MB/s
10-bit Uncompressed HD - 1080p at 23.98 fps 125 MB/s
source
»www.matrox.com/video/en/support/···storage/
--
Well, does your car at least turn into something else? Sometimes I turn it into a trashcan. Hmm...