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Wolfie00
My dog is an elitist
Premium
join:2005-03-12
kudos:8
reply to LastDon

Re: Organic Food.. same as non organic?

TIME magazine offers a more balanced view of the Stanford study than the one-sided op-ed in the National Post:
»healthland.time.com/2012/09/04/i···rieties/

The bottom line seems to be that there are reasons to believe that organic products may sometimes be better for you, but it's a lot harder to prove it in a statistically significant way. Not surprising, since the whole business of demonstrating health effects is a very lengthy and complex process fraught with pitfalls, as any drug company can tell you. That doesn't mean health effects can be dismissed as non-existent, either positive or negative ones.

On the positive side, for instance:

quote:
The researchers did find, however, that organic milk and chicken contained higher levels of omega-3 fatty acids, a healthy fat also found in fish that can reduce the risk of heart disease. Organic produce also contained more total phenols than conventional varieties; phenols include flavonoids that work as antioxidants to fight genetic damage that can lead to cancer and even some neurological disorders like Parkinson’s. But these nutritional differences were small, and the researchers were reluctant to make much of them until further studies confirm the trends.

On the negative side of eating conventional produce subject to pesticides, artificial hormones or other contaminants, one concern is the difficulty of knowing what the "safe" level of any contaminant is. We establish levels as best we can, but it's very difficult to know what the long-term cumulative effects are. We know that incidents of various types of cancer are on the rise, but we don't usually know the root cause. Things like tobacco, or lead in gasoline, were once never considered dangerous at all. Now we know better.

There is a huge difference between not being able to prove that something is true and proving that it is false. Quoting from the article again, for instance:
quote:
Some of the studies found that children eating organic produce had lower levels of pesticide residue in their urine than those consuming conventional produce, but the numbers were too small to draw any general conclusions.

Personally, I don't obsess about organics and only buy it when it seems worthwhile in terms of obviously superior quality.
--
"Everyone is entitled to their own opinion, but not their own facts."
Daniel Patrick Moynihan