dslreports logo
site
 
    All Forums Hot Topics Gallery
spc

spacer




how-to block ads


Search Topic:
uniqs
7129
share rss forum feed

Beaverbob140

join:2011-08-26
united state

1 edit

Extreme 305

For those that were wondering how many DOCSIS channels this will use it will be....0. It will be a residential service similar to their Metro Ethernet service. It will be a fiber line ran to the house (must be within a 1/3 mile of the node), and must be serviced with a Metro Ethernet headend. It will use a Ciena 3931 Service delivery switch and come with a Netgear R6300. Should be priced around $300 a month with a $500 installation/activation fee, and a hefty ETF.



whfsdude
Premium
join:2003-04-05
Washington, DC
Reviews:
·Comcast

Any idea how this will work in cities where they don't have underground conduit and only overhead wires for each block in alleys? I'm guessing it will be restricted to the 10 - 15 houses in the alley with the node.

This being important as their competitive markets (FiOS) are almost all in cities.


Xfinity_Tech

join:2012-08-31
reply to Beaverbob140

*Where and when will you be offering Extreme 305 Internet Service?

** The Extreme 305 Internet Service will be launched across our Northeast division in major markets, including Boston, Hartford, Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, Harrisburg, Wilmington, Baltimore, Washington, D.C., Richmond, and New Jersey. Currently, we’re launching these offerings in this set of initial markets and will be determining future roll-out plans at a later date.

Eligibility:
*Customer must be Metro-E serviceable. Then, fiber site survey must be completed prior to installation to qualify the home/address.

*The site must meet the following criteria:

*Single Dwelling Unit

*Located less than 1/3 of a mile from Fiber Access Node

*Aerial fiber build only (Aerial or Underground drop)

*Serviced by Metro-E capable Head-end (SUR/1G-E Port Available)

Additional Eligibility Guidelines:

*Dwelling with aerial or underground service access must be within 150 feet of the Comcast infrastructure and:

*Either have no obstructions such as hardscaping, paved or unpaved driveways, sidewalks or retaining walls
- Or -

*If these obstructions exist, intact underground conduit readily available for Comcast use must already be in place



KYL

join:2007-03-07
Wilsonville, OR
reply to Beaverbob140

Considering that most areas are getting their B1 Basic TV cut, this is going to free up spectrum and service CAN be done with 12-16 256QAM channel modems. With a CMTS line card upgrade and new modems, this can be done over existing COAX. May be different deployment per area.



bradyr
Columbia College IT
Premium
join:2008-10-27
Sonora, CA
reply to Xfinity_Tech

so does it wind up being a dedicated pair (2 strands) of fiber from the customer back to the CMTS?

I know that the build out they did out here (yes, this is west coast, not eligible for extreme 305 right now.. thats besides the point), there is a fiber splice case near every node.. but judging by the size of the fiber cable they ran, it cant be more than 96-strand fiber to the node (and that's being extremely generous, considering the small splice cases i see).

So how many customers, on average, would comcast be able to serve the extreme 305? is it first-come first-serve until they run out of free fiber?

Obviously i'm thinking about this in the terms that each endpoint requires a pair of fiber (you know, your standard networking layout.. switchrouter, etc)



gar187er
I do this for a living

join:2006-06-24
Dover, DE
kudos:4

there is a splice enclosure at every node, no matter where you are located....if there isnt a contractor needs to be fired. how else you going to splice into the main fiber run?

also you dont need separate fiber back to the head end, you can just mux the wavelengths together.
--
I'm better than you!



bradyr
Columbia College IT
Premium
join:2008-10-27
Sonora, CA

so this sounds like a FTTH setup, correct? if a lot of people on a given node sign up, there is the possibility of comcast having to size up the splice case at the node to handle the growth?

or, like in my area i know of a couple businesses that have metro-e (100Mbps symmetric...my wife works for said business) off the splice case off my node. my node is about a mile (cable length) from my house, but these businesses that had fiber ran to them from comcast are much closer (from the splice case at the node), would comcast build from me back to the to the node (mile away) or from me back to the business they already ran fiber to (less than 1/2 mile away...)



telcodad

join:2011-09-16
Lincroft, NJ
kudos:6
reply to KYL

said by KYL:

Considering that most areas are getting their B1 Basic TV cut, this is going to free up spectrum and service CAN be done with 12-16 256QAM channel modems. With a CMTS line card upgrade and new modems, this can be done over existing COAX. May be different deployment per area.

Yes, this "Extreme 305 Internet Service" does not seem to be the same offering as the "Premier" 300/75 plan that was "scooped" in the »New Internet plans Comcast is working on!! thread and »Here's Comcast's Coming Speed, Pricing Lineup news item only a month ago.


JigglyWiggly

join:2009-07-12
Pleasanton, CA

wo fiber dem pings are making me wet, do want.

however, they should be able to do 300 megabits over coax no?



whfsdude
Premium
join:2003-04-05
Washington, DC
Reviews:
·Comcast

said by JigglyWiggly:

however, they should be able to do 300 megabits over coax no?

Yes but even with more channels I think it becomes hard to scale when you have several customers who want a 300mbit tier.

Also what do you do when Verizon (FiOS) announces 500mbits, or 800mbits, etc. At some point you just have to invest in new infrastructure.


SHoTTa35

@optonline.net
reply to gar187er

Figured each fiber strand can handle 1Gbps each way with ease so 1 strand should be more than good enough per customer.



TriForce

join:2008-05-27
Chico, CA
reply to whfsdude

Coax can do higher channel bonding, it's just that the equipment isn't ready nor reliable.

Metro-E can reach 10Gbps for business customers. Comcast could rely on the Ethernet solution for higher speeds.



Mike Wolf

join:2009-05-24
Beachwood, NJ
kudos:3
reply to Beaverbob140

Is it a requirement to use the Netgear R6300?



SHoTTa35

@optonline.net

It's probably configured with a custom firmware since it's Metro-E they are doing. It would be doing the job of a Cisco router or SMG that they give out now to static customers to handle your static routing tables and who knows what else.



Mike Wolf

join:2009-05-24
Beachwood, NJ
kudos:3

But any common router can be statically set too though. I just hope its not mandatory 'cause Comcast and Netgear really haven't had that good a track record this year.


iansltx

join:2007-02-19
Austin, TX
kudos:2
Reviews:
·Time Warner Cable
·Verizon Online DSL
·Comcast
reply to SHoTTa35

My bet is that Comcast hands out DHCP upstream of their CMTS, such that they can still hand out a DHCP address to anyone on 300/75, with a standard router (behind a media converter). Nothing different than with a cable modem, except the interface is different.



whfsdude
Premium
join:2003-04-05
Washington, DC
Reviews:
·Comcast
reply to Mike Wolf

said by Mike Wolf:

But any common router can be statically set too though. I just hope its not mandatory 'cause Comcast and Netgear really haven't had that good a track record this year.

LOL Yes! The whole bit about Netgear halting their v6 deployments for a good month.


whfsdude
Premium
join:2003-04-05
Washington, DC
Reviews:
·Comcast

1 recommendation

reply to iansltx

said by iansltx:

My bet is that Comcast hands out DHCP upstream of their CMTS, such that they can still hand out a DHCP address to anyone on 300/75, with a standard router (behind a media converter). Nothing different than with a cable modem, except the interface is different.

[crazy_theory]
Since this is a new consumer offering, I wonder if Comcast will make it IPv6 only, and use Dual-Stack Lite as the transition mechanism.

This would essentially force the use of the router for a few years until linux routers start supporting DS Lite.
[/crazy_theory]


JigglyWiggly

join:2009-07-12
Pleasanton, CA

anyone else think it's just weird to hear the word comcast and fiber? Well they needed more fiber in their diet



RR Conductor
NWP RR Inc.,serving NW CA
Premium
join:2002-04-02
Redwood Valley, CA
kudos:1
reply to Beaverbob140

I'd love 305, and I'm within a half mile of our Node (it's between two poles on Vineyard Oaks Dr), but not for 300 bucks, are they kidding? The cable, power and telephone lines run to the corner of Vineyard Oaks Dr and Forsythe Dr, then drop underground at that spot as our development (Forsythe Village) has all underground utilities. This is a very rural area (Mendocino County, NW CA), so I doubt we'll even see this anytime soon.



JigglyWiggly

join:2009-07-12
Pleasanton, CA

1 edit

of course nobody is going to pay for it
but they'll roll it out slowly anyway
then one day it will only be 250$



RR Conductor
NWP RR Inc.,serving NW CA
Premium
join:2002-04-02
Redwood Valley, CA
kudos:1

said by JigglyWiggly:

of course nobody is going to pay for it
but they'll roll it out slowly anyway
then one day it will only be 250$

Lol $250, what a bargain!

n_w95482
Premium
join:2005-08-03
Ukiah, CA

1 recommendation

reply to RR Conductor

said by RR Conductor:

I'd love 305, and I'm within a half mile of our Node (it's between two poles on Vineyard Oaks Dr), but not for 300 bucks, are they kidding? The cable, power and telephone lines run to the corner of Vineyard Oaks Dr and Forsythe Dr, then drop underground at that spot as our development (Forsythe Village) has all underground utilities. This is a very rural area (Mendocino County, NW CA), so I doubt we'll even see this anytime soon.

One way to think about it would be slightly less than one dollar per megabit of downstream bandwidth, versus three times that for Blast up here. Considering the relatively specialized equipment and setup, it seems cheap to me.
--
KI6RIT


DrDrew
That others may surf
Premium
join:2009-01-28
SoCal
kudos:15
reply to RR Conductor

It's FIBER to your home



MAIZnBLUE
Premium
join:2004-01-15
Milan, MI
reply to Beaverbob140

About two months ago they were running fiber optic down our road we stopped and talked to the man and he said that it was for Comcast said that it would be much faster than the regular cable service so this makes sense now that I'm reading it... so we have coax and fiber optic ran on our poles and they are both in the air...
I live in Milan, Michigan



Zenit

join:2012-05-07
N. VA, USA
Reviews:
·Comcast
·T-Mobile US
·Verizon Online DSL
reply to Beaverbob140

Sounds like Comcast is creeping to FTTH. Metro-E sounds like an expensive, inefficient way of doing it though. (Clearly working with what they have...)

Still, a Metro-E for only $300, + 500 for Fiber to your home?

$300 is a LOT of money a month, but its pretty amazing the cost can be reduced that much...I wonder how much fiber they will run for that $500 install.

If Comcast switches to IPTV (Theoretically) and devotes all channels in the system to DOCSIS, how much bandwidth could they pull off?
I know the above is unlikely, but its probably cheaper than building a totally new system.



JigglyWiggly

join:2009-07-12
Pleasanton, CA

if they are going fiber
they may as well go all out



DrDrew
That others may surf
Premium
join:2009-01-28
SoCal
kudos:15
reply to Zenit

said by Zenit:

If Comcast switches to IPTV (Theoretically) and devotes all channels in the system to DOCSIS, how much bandwidth could they pull off?

6 gbps.
38mbps per 256QAM channel x 158 channels in 1000 Mhz bandwidth.
--
If it's important, back it up... twice. Even 99.999% availability isn't enough sometimes.


RR Conductor
NWP RR Inc.,serving NW CA
Premium
join:2002-04-02
Redwood Valley, CA
kudos:1

2 edits
reply to DrDrew

said by DrDrew:

It's FIBER to your home

Companies here in NorCal like Surewest and and Sonic are offering FTTH for FAR Less than 300 bucks. I doubt we'll see FTTH here in Mendocino County anytime soon, but who knows, I was suprised in 2000 when Adelphia announced they'd upgrade the entire system here for Digital Cable in 2001, and HSI in 2002, they did it and I rejoiced! Adelphia got the system here in Mendocino County from Century Communications, whom they acquired in 1999.

»www.wired.com/techbiz/media/news···03/18294

Then of course Comcast got us from Adelphia

Edit-They might find a lot of buyers in certain locations in the Bay Area (ie.Palo Alto, Atherton), but I doubt they would for that up here, this is a relatively poor country. I bet they're only targeting areas with existing fiber competition, but 300 seems awfully steep.


EG
The wings of love
Premium
join:2006-11-18
Union, NJ
kudos:9
reply to TriForce

said by TriForce:

Coax can do higher channel bonding, it's just that the equipment isn't ready nor reliable.

Metro-E can reach 10Gbps for business customers. Comcast could rely on the Ethernet solution for higher speeds.

Some day they will have to abandon their "last mile" hybrid fiber / coax infrastructure... It would eliminate most of the current major maintenance / cost issues for them as well.