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SwedishRider
Rider on the Storm
Premium
join:2006-01-11
not Sweden
kudos:1
reply to Msradell

Re: Wheel-drive vs Track-drive vs Tractor-mounted Snow Blowers

said by Msradell:

Looking at the videos of the snow blower mouth of the tractor I see that the blower attachment is only a single stage blower. If you're talking about an area that gets any significance snow you definitely want one with two stages. The first stage runs slower and is the auger that breaks down list though and pulls it in. The second stage were as much faster to throw the snow. If you watch the video you can see the snow being thrown forward, this is snow that didn't go out the chute and is just recycling to be thrown out again!

Nah... it's a two-stage snow thrower (at least the one I might buy is). Here's the link: »www.husqvarna.com/ca/en/accessor···thrower/


SwedishRider
Rider on the Storm
Premium
join:2006-01-11
not Sweden
kudos:1
reply to Lurch77

said by Lurch77:

Trade in your Husky for this, problem solved.

(youtube clip)

That thing is just ridiculous!! I want one.


Lurch77
Premium
join:2001-11-22
Oconto, WI
kudos:4

My 10yo son said the same thing when he watched the video. He asked if I wanted it. I said yes. I wouldn't be able to use it, but I still want it.



dennismurphy
Put me on hold? I'll put YOU on hold
Premium
join:2002-11-19
Parsippany, NJ
kudos:3
Reviews:
·Verizon FiOS

1 edit
reply to SwedishRider

Now you know why I recommended the Steiner tractor back when you were evaluating the mower. Throw on the snow cab, hook up the thrower to the PTO, and you're off to the races. The Steiner even uses engine heat in the snow cab.

Awesome piece of machinery
»www.steinerturf.com/attachments.asp



stev32k
Premium
join:2000-04-27
Mobile, AL
kudos:1
reply to SwedishRider

Wow, am I glad I don't have to worry about snow removal. Just mowing the grass is bad enough.



Robert
Premium
join:2002-03-11
St John'S, NL
reply to SwedishRider

Husqvarna says it is good for up to 10 degrees. That should answer your question.



SwedishRider
Rider on the Storm
Premium
join:2006-01-11
not Sweden
kudos:1

said by Robert:

Husqvarna says it is good for up to 10 degrees. That should answer your question.

That is Husqvarna's claim... but actual use in heavy snow may be another story. If the dealer would let me try the blower out and return it if it didn't work out, I'd bite for it... but if I own it after first use, I'll be pretty upset that I wasted money on something that can't do the job.

I'd like to believe the 10-degrees claim... but logical reasoning about the realities of snow and hills is making that a tough sell for me.


Pacrat
Old and Cranky
Premium,MVM
join:2001-03-10
Cortland, OH
kudos:2
Reviews:
·Time Warner Cable
reply to SwedishRider

Y'know... if you take your good ol' time and let the tractor move at a reasonable pace, traction will not be an issue. Give the blower time to do its job instead of trying to horse it through the heavy stuff and you'll have no problem at all. It's when you try to hurry that everything bogs down and things start to slip. My Cub has some traction issues every once in awhile if I'm in a hurry. I have 168#of suitcase weights on a mounting bracket hanging off the rear end and it still slips occasionally. But if I don't try to crowd it, it rolls along just fine. I have a set of wheel chains for it, but the last couple of years I haven't bothered to put them on. If you take your time and let it do its job, you wont have any problems.

The best thing you can do for yourself to get the drive cleared down to bare pavement is get ti done before it's driven on at all. The skid shoes will ride up on hard-packed snow, keeping the scraper blade from getting all the way down to the pavement if you don't.
--
Keep your eye on the ball, your shoulder to the wheel, your nose to the grindstone, and your ear to the ground. Now, try to work in that position!!!



Daarken
Rara Avises
Premium
join:2005-01-12
Southwest LA
kudos:3
reply to SwedishRider

Here is your unit, or a simillar unit to it with a plow attachment, snow chains and wheel waits doing a driveway.

»youtu.be/DBiIoV6o7gw

--
Getting it Done.

iknow
Premium
join:2012-03-25
reply to SwedishRider

here's a video of the track drive snowblower, this is more impressive.

»www.youtube.com/watch?v=RiRP_HP6···=related


Lurch77
Premium
join:2001-11-22
Oconto, WI
kudos:4

What's so impressive about that? It's not doing anything any other snow blower couldn't do, tracked or wheeled.



SwedishRider
Rider on the Storm
Premium
join:2006-01-11
not Sweden
kudos:1
reply to Daarken

said by Daarken:

Here is your unit, or a simillar unit to it with a plow attachment, snow chains and wheel waits doing a driveway.

»youtu.be/DBiIoV6o7gw

It is very similar to mine, but I think the 13M is 2wd, so chains are allowed... and therein lies the problem for me. As far as I can tell, AWD Riders (like mine) cannot use chains nor wheel weights... only counterweights. The other issue in that video is that I don't think there is anything close to a 9 degree slope being plowed... it's relatively flat, which is not close to my situation.

I have a local dealer checking with Husqvarna tech support to confirm that chains and tire ballast are a no-no. If they are not recommended but are allowed and won't damage the machine... then it's time to consider a blower and/or snow blade. If not, I think I will then go with the track-drive snowblower option.


SwedishRider
Rider on the Storm
Premium
join:2006-01-11
not Sweden
kudos:1
reply to Lurch77

said by Lurch77:

What's so impressive about that? It's not doing anything any other snow blower couldn't do, tracked or wheeled.

Truthfully, I've seen video of the track-drive snowblowers, but always on relatively flat land. I'd like to see a video of one blowing up and down a steep driveway. For all the marketing hype, I'd like to see the performance when the rubber hits the road. For all I've seen, my AWD with a blower might perform just as well/poorly... tough to say without seeing it firsthand.


SwedishRider
Rider on the Storm
Premium
join:2006-01-11
not Sweden
kudos:1
reply to Lurch77

Found one video of hillside use of a track snowblower:

»www.youtube.com/watch?v=tTyxhnH3iQs


Msradell
P.E.
Premium
join:2008-12-25
Louisville, KY

That's the deal really isn't very impressive. Going uphill he wasn't blowing any snow, he was only following the path he made going downhill. In addition the ground is very loose and easy to get traction on, a regular snow blower with chains would do just as well!


garys_2k
Premium
join:2004-05-07
Farmington, MI
Reviews:
·Callcentric
·callwithus

said by Msradell:

That's the deal really isn't very impressive. Going uphill he wasn't blowing any snow, he was only following the path he made going downhill.

That's the way to do it. Blow the snow on the way down, when gravity is helping you improve traction, and let it carry its weight only back up, when the traction you do have on the slippery surface already has plenty to do.


Jack_in_VA
Premium
join:2007-11-26
North, VA
kudos:1
reply to SwedishRider

Following this thread makes me very happy I don't for the most part ever have to contend with snow removal. Very little snow and even less that is a problem.



tmh

@verizon.net
reply to SnowyHill

said by SnowyHill :

Steep slope - You only need to clear the path up once - then do all the rest of the hard work coming down.

Any advice for a homeowner with a 100 ft driveway on a 20 deg incline? I'm leery of walking uphill behind a powered snowblower.


HarryH3
Premium
join:2005-02-21
kudos:2
Reviews:
·Suddenlink

said by tmh :

Any advice for a homeowner with a 100 ft driveway on a 20 deg incline? I'm leery of walking uphill behind a powered snowblower.

Buy an old 4WD with a plow. Chains on all 4 tires. Keep the battery on a trickle charger.


Draiman
Let me see those devil horns in the sky

join:2012-06-01
Kill Devil Hills, NC
Reviews:
·Verizon FiOS
reply to SwedishRider

Our driveway is somewhere between 12-14% slope to the road. It's a state road so the end of the driveway gets heavy wet snow. We needed a beefy snow blower to handle it. I went with Arien's Deluxe 24 and it's been working great.
--
IF YOU FIND ANY MISTAKES IN MY WORK...Please consider that they are there for a purpose. I try to please everyone and there is always someone looking for mistakes!



jester121
Premium
join:2003-08-09
Lake Zurich, IL
reply to SwedishRider

Click for full size
Click for full size
Not so much on the super deep snow, but this one kicks ass for width. I forget how much it costs though...


SwedishRider
Rider on the Storm
Premium
join:2006-01-11
not Sweden
kudos:1

Again, that looks cool, but even with the dualie wheels, I would have to question performance on a consistent 9-degree slope. it's not the width and speed that's the issue as much as it's the traction on the way up (and also on the way down).


robbin
Premium,MVM
join:2000-09-21
Leander, TX
kudos:1

What is the availability of snow equipment for your rider? Is it something the dealer keeps in stock or at a regional warehouse or does it take a month to get it?



SwedishRider
Rider on the Storm
Premium
join:2006-01-11
not Sweden
kudos:1

said by robbin:

What is the availability of snow equipment for your rider? Is it something the dealer keeps in stock or at a regional warehouse or does it take a month to get it?

Good question. I'm in the process of getting that answer. Rider parts and accessories seem to be available, but timeframe from order to pick-up thus far has been more than for an average tractor.


pike
Premium,MVM
join:2001-02-01
Washington, DC
kudos:3

1 recommendation

reply to Draiman

said by Draiman:

It's a state road so the end of the driveway gets heavy wet snow.

Was not aware the authority responsible for maintaining the right-of-way determined the type and density of snowfall accumulation!


Draiman
Let me see those devil horns in the sky

join:2012-06-01
Kill Devil Hills, NC
Reviews:
·Verizon FiOS

said by pike:

said by Draiman:

It's a state road so the end of the driveway gets heavy wet snow.

Was not aware the authority responsible for maintaining the right-of-way determined the type and density of snowfall accumulation!

Then I'm glad I could broaden your knowledge!
--
IF YOU FIND ANY MISTAKES IN MY WORK...Please consider that they are there for a purpose. I try to please everyone and there is always someone looking for mistakes!


Pacrat
Old and Cranky
Premium,MVM
join:2001-03-10
Cortland, OH
kudos:2
Reviews:
·Time Warner Cable
reply to pike

I believe the statement referred more to the accumulation of wet/slush deposited at the end of the driveway by the snow plows. I get that around here. Seems it never fails that I just get the drive done and the city decides to send the plows around for one more pass and the end of the drive gets buried with slush. Fortunately, my Cub makes short work of all that "gunk". I have learned to delay as long as possible, before cleaning my drive.

I remember some years ago, we seemed to get a lot of very heavy snows during the day, and the slush the plows deposited at the ends of the drives in the neighborhood had a distinct tendency to freeze in a solid mass right after dark. I helped out a lot of the neighbors that year... just clearing the bottom 15' of their drives after the plows went through. At that was with my old, smaller tractor and 40" blower. The new Cub 2550 w/42" blower just eats up that stuff and tosses it aside.

I have found, through "trial & error", over the years, is that traction is no problem if you get to the drive before it has been driven on and packed down. I used to need chains on my old Cub, but the new one is considerably heavier, so far, the chains have been unnecessary. The suitcase weights I have on the back serve more to counter-balance the snow-blower attachment hanging off the front than they do for traction. I'm sure they do aid the traction, but I'm not sure they're necessary.
--
Keep your eye on the ball, your shoulder to the wheel, your nose to the grindstone, and your ear to the ground. Now, try to work in that position!!!


robbin
Premium,MVM
join:2000-09-21
Leander, TX
kudos:1

1 edit
reply to SwedishRider

Just had a thought -- what if you bought a second set of tires for winter use and put ice studs in them? It says that they can be taken out but seems easier to just keep a winter set.

»www.kenjones.com/Scripts/XListAl···ledFrom=

[edit] Then have the tires foam filled and it won't matter if the studs penetrated the tire

»www.airfreetires.com/shopping/c-···ill.aspx



dwane
I recommend Start.ca

join:2003-10-08
Pembroke, ON
Reviews:
·Start Communicat..
·Cogeco Cable
reply to SwedishRider

I own a big beast of a track driven snowblower.
It does an fine job, but pivoting and turning can require a little more physical effort than a wheeled machine.
A lot of how your blower performs has to do with what kind of snow you're moving - light powder vs. packed wet snow.
I'd dread having to move wet snow while on a steep grade, everything gets slippery.
My driveway is chipped limestone. My first winter blowing it out was last year, but like someone else commented, you purposly leave some snow down to pack and create a nice hard surface so you don't end up sending chips all over your lawn. I just set the skis higher about an inch on the front of the blower.
In the long and short of it, I don't think there's a huge benefit/difference between track driven or wheel driven blowers.
Track drives just look more kick-ass.
--
"There are no dangerous weapons, only dangerous men." - Sgt. Zim.



Chinabound
Premium
join:2002-12-21
Antioch, IL
kudos:3

1 recommendation

reply to SwedishRider

Click for full size
Hi Jim. I've read your dilemma, I've watched all of the videos, and I'm from Westport, so I'm very familiar with your environment. I think this is going to bug me until I post.

Every video gave me the same feeling inside. You get your share of heavy, wet snow in Connecticut - more than the light, fluffy stuff. I honestly don't think you will be happy with any attachment you decide on for your Swedish Rider. It doesn't move fast enough and you know the wheels are going to slip. The tires on it now are designed to be easy on turf, so I can't imagine they'd be worth a damn in the snow.

I bought a very nice used Toro two stage a few years ago. I was shoveling a 100 foot driveway for years, and decided I had had it and found a great deal on the blower. Big, powerful son-of-a-bitch. Well, it made the job a lot easier, but I was still out there for an hour or two (depending on the amount of snow), only this time I was freezing my ass off because I wasn't working my body.

That's when I decided to look into an atv. It was the best decision I could have made, and I was still unaware that we'd be buying a house three months later with a much longer driveway. 340 feet from the road to my attached garage, and then another 230 feet around to the buildings in the back.
Not only does it handle any amount of any kind of snow, including the heavy crap the plows leave at the end of our driveways, but it never slips and the added speed available is a lot of help when encountering high, dense snow drifts. The speed and momentum allows it to handle anything. Plus, I can't forget to mention it is a very fun way to do something we all find a pain in the ass to do, as well.

If you have the funds and the space to store it - this is what I'd strongly suggest. You can also use it for a lot of other tasks, depending on the size of your property.