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psweber

join:2012-09-18
tchad

[HN7000S] BUC compatability?

I have several sites here in Africa using DW6000 but mostly HN7000S modems. I have run 3-4 sites for 8+ years now. I bought a lot of 5 HN7000S modems complete with 1.2 dish and LNBs. The first 7000 I set up lost signal after about 2yrs. I solved the problem by swapping in the LNB from my 6000 series. The second site with a 7000 died a couple of months ago and recently I tries setting it up with new (unused) 7000 series equipment and it ran for only 24hrs on the matching LNB. Again I had an old LNB from an decommissioned 6000 and that solved the problem. I am wondering if there is a known incompatibility between the HN7000s and the LNB I am using. PN1035818-0004 (Green tag). I have found reports on -0002 and -0008 but none on this particular one. Curiously the box lists it for Asia/Eutelsat and we are in Africa on IS10. Any info or where to look would be helpful. Hughes is not very helpful when we are not subscribed through them.



dbirdman
Premium,MVM
join:2003-07-07
usa
kudos:5

I'm guessing there is a lot of confusion in your post that makes it difficult to answer. The topic is the BUC, and the part number appears to be for the BUC, but there are 5 or so references to LNBs, which are not BUCs. Perhaps you can clarify, keeping in mind that the BUC is the transmitter, sometimes called the radio, and is the finned box that can be 1 or 2-watt. The LNB is the receiver, and is mounted near the top of the guide. Together, the LNB, horn, and BUC are referred to as a tria.

Generally speaking, the BUC and LNB do not care (or know) whether they are attached to a 4000, 4020, 6000, DW7000, or HN7000S.

There may, however, be geographical differences or satellite differences that could make the hardware for one location not work in another. For example the LNBs in the US have a local oscillator of 10.75GHZ, but it is possible that in other parts of the world you might need a 10.0GHZ local oscillator.
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Motosat self-pointing dishes: 1.2-meter XF-3 on 93W, .74 meter G74 on 127W, SL-5 HD DirecTV|idirect 3100|Hughes HN7000S|Verizon UMW190 Air Card|1990 Blue Bird Wanderlodge Bus "Blue Thunder"|Author of hnFAP-Alert, PC-OPI and DSSatTool


psweber

join:2012-09-18
tchad
reply to psweber

Thank you for your reply. The number quoted is for the tria. Though I have used and installed several systems over the past 10yrs I am somewhat of an amature I presume the problem I am having is with the LNB as the issue is declining and finally dying SQF#. The modems I was sold work for a short time then refuse to get a receive signal but then work fine if I pair them with the tria I received originally with my 6000 series modems. PN1033506-0004



grohgreg
Dunno. Ask The Chief

join:2001-07-05
Dawson Springs, KY

1 edit
reply to psweber

The issue sounds to me like the power adapter. It's the small black (or gray) box in the modem power cord. Its job is to convert AC mains power to the DC operating voltage and current levels to subsequently power the modem and the TRIA. Older two way equipment used a 45 or 54 watt power adapter, which many folks simply used after upgrading to newer equipment. The HN6000 and HN7000S require either a 64w or 80w power adapter, depending upon which TRIA they're used with. This is especially critical with 2 watt TRIAs (green tagged). See attached document.

//greg//
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HN7000S - 98cm Prodelin/2w "pure" Osiris - ProPlus - G16/1001H - NOC:GTN - NAT 67.142.115.130 - Gateway 66.82.25.10 - DNS 66.82.4.12 and 66.82.4.8 - Firefox 15/MSIE9 - AV/Firewalled by NIS2012


dbirdman
Premium,MVM
join:2003-07-07
usa
kudos:5

As I recall, the old one was a 45 watt.

On edit: I see that is what the PDF says also.