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« 12 miles out
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Sukunai
Premium
join:2008-05-07
kudos:1
Reviews:
·ELECTRONICBOX
·TekSavvy DSL

Nothing strange about this objective.

Nothing strange about this objective.

Nothing remains the same, and it isn't like it has to be only the consumer that wishes the market would hurry up and evolve.

I am not even surprised that the big corporations wish to indulge dramatic changes to how business is conducted.

I'm just glad some of the communications world WANTS to enjoy the current year, and NOT be like Hollywood and insist that it can be 1950 indefinitely.

I think a world without cable and phone line, and entirely wireless sounds interesting. I actually wouldn't mind trying a world where I can use my service anywhere I want, and pay for only as much as I actually use.

In 2005 I WANTED hundreds of gigs a month. In 2010 I finally was able to see that all of those hundreds of gigs a month were mainly about replacing non digital copies of video, with digital forms. And I have with Netflix, even managed to leave needing any form of copy at all behind.

I hardly ever download a damn thing now. Accept a few game purchases.

I wish I could have access to my internet anywhere I was, and not need a free hotspot.


canestim

join:2012-01-20

1 recommendation

Do you realize how many gigs one hd stream from Netflix is? How are you going to stream movies to replaces your non-digital copies with that 10GB data cap with your Verizon LTE Home Fusion service? Hope you don't need to update Windows or Mac in the same month you decide to watch your politician documentary in HD. You may not download or save something to you hard drive anymore as you claim, but when you stream Netflix or Youtube you are actually still temporarily downloading the file to your computer.

These companies are only trying to take advantage of the consumer as usual. They say, we need more spectrum blah blah blah, but if they can't handle what traffic they have now how are they going to handle millions of DSL customers that are used to using as much data as they want without taking out a second mortgage. They refuse to build more towers now to ease spectrum crunch so what makes you think they will when they kill of DSL. What they will do is charge major overages to keep network traffic in check.

Wireless needs to complement wire, not replace it.


Sukunai
Premium
join:2008-05-07
kudos:1
Reviews:
·ELECTRONICBOX
·TekSavvy DSL

1 recommendation

reply to Sukunai

You are unfortunately thinking old thinking.

Today it is a gig, I can remember when the internet was measured in speeds that sounded almost odd. A modem was something that made all sorts of squawking noises.

Yes the video we watch uses a lot of bandwidth. And I hardly expect wireless to remain the same wireless it currently is.

I can remember when cable only sent a TV signal to a TV too.
I can remember when a phone line was only good for a phone call.

I don't really see a need to assume the old forms of transmission need remain the same.

But I think the future is more with fibre based tech actually. I am not sure wireless will actually ever be the best route. But it does have it's advantages.

I don't resent companies trying to get an edge with technology. Why should it only be the consumer that gets to enjoy all the perks?

I just hate people like Hollywood, that simply refuse to accept society has moved on, whether Hollywood likes it or not.


hottboiinnc
ME

join:2003-10-15
Cleveland, OH
reply to canestim

Wireless can replace as long as the caps are raised. And users need to realize that caps are here to stay weather you want them or not.



inteller
Sociopaths always win.

join:2003-12-08
Tulsa, OK
reply to Sukunai

Lumberjack Stephenson says...

everybody launch their chainsaw app and lets start cutting through this underbrush!


--
"WHEN THE LAUGH TRACK STARTS THEN THE FUN STARTS!"

rradina

join:2000-08-08
Chesterfield, MO
reply to Sukunai

Re: Nothing strange about this objective.

You say fiber but who's going to bury it? Google?

Verizon has given up on expanding FIOS. Too costly. They, like AT&T, love wireless and its massive margin. If Verizon has booted copper and the idea of an in-ground network, do we think AT&T will experiment with fiber only to come to Verizon's conclusion?

I do agree that how we view today's gigabyte will likely be a terabyte in the future. When that happens, video won't be an issue.


canestim

join:2012-01-20

1 recommendation

reply to Sukunai

Businesses are here to serve customers while making a profit. If they don't provide good service they don't deserve the "perks" you act like they are entitled to. Problem is monopolies or oligopolies do not provide good service unless they are forced to, and the government does a poor job at it. They don't have to provide good service because you don't have any choice. You have to earn perks right?

I can "remember" all those things as well. I also remember poor regulation and monopolies taking advantage of customers. Long distance anyone?

I agree with you, tech needs to move in that direction. But it needs to compliment it. If they gave them that power they could turn the switch off on millions of customers without notice, and that is not acceptable.


canestim

join:2012-01-20
reply to hottboiinnc

I don't think anyone is really disputing that, of course it can replace it. If it's done right. But you're trusting monopolies/oligopolies to raise caps with government oversight? Doesn't sound like a winning combination to me. The way it's playing out we will only have two providers, less competition is not good for the consumer. And look at how great the government has been at regulating it thus far.


WernerSchutz

join:2009-08-04
Sugar Land, TX
reply to hottboiinnc

Monopolies and shills should realize that customers do not like them and WILL get rid of them whether they like it or not.


Albert71292

join:2004-10-31
West Monroe, LA
reply to Sukunai

"Entirely wireless" would never do in my household. My son is a heavy online gamer. The latency would piss him off entirely.

Also, I watch a LOT of online video (Leo Laporte's "This Week in Tech" network mainly), caps would eat me alive!

What would this do to the third party DSL providers? I'm with one of them. Would it put them out of business... meaning more jobs lost?



MovieLover76

join:2009-09-11
kudos:1

1 recommendation

reply to Sukunai

Your ideas are contradictory.
Wired internet will always have much more capacity than wireless, AT&T and Verizon abandoning DSL to rural will lead to higher prices as cable will have a monopoly.

Eliminate cable, and welcome to paying $15 in overages just to watch one netflix movie in HD.

We need meaningful competition and a more expansive wired internet infrastructure, fiber optic if at all possible, as well as good national LTE coverage for when we are on the road.

These moves are about one thing and one thing only
Greed

If cable becomes a monopoly and wireless is already practically a duopoly, enjoy bending over and paying out of as* for every bit of data you consume.


hottboiinnc
ME

join:2003-10-15
Cleveland, OH
reply to canestim

and this is why unlicensed WiMax is available. Anyone is free to launch their own ISP. Why does it always have be to be on the ILEC and the major MSOs? Why can't some every day Joe launch the company that competes? Oh wait, DSLR doesn't believe in that.


hottboiinnc
ME

join:2003-10-15
Cleveland, OH
reply to WernerSchutz

as long as you have 2 or more choices you no longer have a monopoly.


hottboiinnc
ME

join:2003-10-15
Cleveland, OH
reply to canestim

and the Gov't does NOT need to but into the private businesses. If that was the case we'd be like China where the gov't owns the phone company and there is only one.

And still counting back on past history will NOT move anyone forward. it just keeps everyone behind. Why not just kill the wireline, especially in areas it does NOT make sense to keep and move those customers to wireless? It makes sense from a business stand point and customer stand point as the customer would be able to have HSI and VoIP and the business saves $$$ while bringing in more $$$ due to expanding customers serviced.


WernerSchutz

join:2009-08-04
Sugar Land, TX
reply to hottboiinnc

Because a duopoly is so much better when collusion and regulatory capture occur. My bad.


WernerSchutz

join:2009-08-04
Sugar Land, TX
reply to hottboiinnc

So much better to have giants like Bell and Standard Oil that gov't should just let screw the customers whichever way they want.


elray

join:2000-12-16
Santa Monica, CA
Reviews:
·Time Warner Cable
·EarthLink
reply to canestim

said by canestim:

Do you realize how many gigs one hd stream from Netflix is?

That's Netflix's problem, not AT&T's.

The internet does not exist to replace cable or satellite tv.

viperlmw
Premium
join:2005-01-25
reply to hottboiinnc

3 words: Middle Mile prices.


viperlmw
Premium
join:2005-01-25
reply to elray

According to at&t it does!


canestim

join:2012-01-20
reply to elray

That would be ok if duopolies and monopolies did not exist because someone would provide the service consumers want that AT&T is not willing to do. All of you guys on here are funny, I think you just like playing Devil's Advocate (while you watch Netflix on your plush cable connection). Don't understand all the siding with corporations over yourselves and the consumer.


canestim

join:2012-01-20
reply to hottboiinnc

Government shouldn't be involved in private business, free market business. Utilities, yes including Inernet (which has become a necessity basically) has to be regulated because you can't have 100 companies putting up towers or running wires. Utilities are not free market in our country the way the are set up. Maybe if they went to a model like in Europe, I don't know.


Skippy25

join:2000-09-13
Hazelwood, MO

1 recommendation

reply to hottboiinnc

Wireless will never match the speed, the latency nor the efficiency of a fiber network.

It simply is not possible based on sheer physics of wireless wave lengths compared to light.


Skippy25

join:2000-09-13
Hazelwood, MO
reply to elray

See you corporate friendly folks seem to forget what the internet was and why it was corrected.

It has been bastardized kind of like Christmas. Once companies see there is money to be made they shape and distort whatever they can into their liking and hope we dont see the smoke and mirrors behind it all. Unfortunately, we allow it to happen.

The internet exist to provide it's users whatever they want.

So if they want Netflix, then yes it is AT&T's problem. Do you remember the days when AOL thought they knew what their users wanted and tried to force that upon them? Yeah... where are they today?


Skippy25

join:2000-09-13
Hazelwood, MO
reply to hottboiinnc

Lets correct your statement and say Government does not need to buy into private business unless private business fails to deliver and the people (whom are the government) have elected for them to do so because of those failures.

Like it or not, if the people want the government to provide a service, regardless of how well the private sector provides it, then the government is obligated to serve it's people as they request. It is the entire purpose of the government.

I also like the lie you portray in your last sentence. Companies like AT&T could have their expenses completely zeroed out saving them billions and not a single customer will see a decrease in their bill. However, you can be sure that the CEO and shareholders see a big "bonus" fat check.



JigglyWiggly

join:2009-07-12
Pleasanton, CA
reply to elray

noo i need my dsl for gaming and a comcast lien for browsing >:|



88615298
Premium
join:2004-07-28
West Tenness
reply to canestim

said by canestim:

Do you realize how many gigs one hd stream from Netflix is? How are you going to stream movies to replaces your non-digital copies with that 10GB data cap with your Verizon LTE Home Fusion service?

You realize in areas where one's only option is something like HomeFusion DSL doesn't even exist anyway. Places where DSL exists are in populated areas that are serviced by cable.

decifal

join:2007-03-10
Bon Aqua, TN
kudos:1

said by 88615298:

said by canestim:

Do you realize how many gigs one hd stream from Netflix is? How are you going to stream movies to replaces your non-digital copies with that 10GB data cap with your Verizon LTE Home Fusion service?

You realize in areas where one's only option is something like HomeFusion DSL doesn't even exist anyway. Places where DSL exists are in populated areas that are serviced by cable.

Not always true.. My brother has ATT dsl, but cable comes nowhere even close to the area... I can think of quite a few places where this is the trend.. So, its not by any means a default thing..

canestim

join:2012-01-20
reply to 88615298

There are millions and millions of people where DSL is the only option for wired Internet, wired Internet aka the real Internet aka not capped and/or dodgy signal 3G, LTE, or Satellite. And these people (like me) actually do live in populated cities. So yes I do realize that but why don't you go tell that to the millions of people (who only have DSL no cable option) who could possibly have their DSL shut of because of this.

It probably doesn't matter to you and all the others on here playing DA because you all probably have both options and don't care, outta sight outta mind. But like others said all you're doing is creating another monopoly (cable) and they will start to raise prices. They should spin the company off or the FCC should let them sell/transfer their lines to another company until a real replacement is ready for the big time.



Desertisp

@verizon.net
reply to Skippy25

I have to disagree with this statement. I work for a wireless ISP in a underserved area and we routinely push 200mbit+ over our backhauls and customers see no more than 5 - 10ms on all hops within our network before it hits our backbone to the Internet. So it's entirely possible to keep up at least with latency and coax or fiber, speeds to the customer is entirely dependent on distance, line of sight and how much of the airwaves are saturated on that frequency which admittedly means speeds may not be up to par to the end user but we still can push 20mbit easily to each CPE on our network.



Oh_No
Trogglus normalus

join:2011-05-21
Chicago, IL
reply to canestim

The future is government regulation of internet and requiring there be no caps, no throttling, and a % guarantee of your download/upload speeds.
This will have to happen or then we will all be screwed by having to pay by the byte at millions of times more than the actual cost.