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IowaCowboy
Iowa native
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join:2010-10-16
Springfield, MA
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reply to pandora

Re: Anyone have a suggestion for standby whole home generator?

said by pandora:

Our last electric bill for the older (smaller home, 3,200 sq ft) was about 2600 KWH over 28 days. 93 KWH per day, 3.8 KW per hour if all use was average.

I don't know what part of the country you live in but if you lived in the Northeast (New England states/New York), your electric bills would be through the roof. I live in Massachusetts and I pay twice as much per month for my side of the duplex than my former neighbor pays for a single family home in Iowa. Connecticut has even worse electric rates than we do in Massachusetts, and Maine is more reasonable. Of course I've changed almost every light with CFL/LED light bulbs (the only place I don't use CFL light bulbs is the full bath because the steam from the shower murders CFL bulbs so I use traditional incandescent light bulbs there) and my electric bills are still high.
--
I wish I still lived in Iowa; Everything there from rent and groceries to Cable TV is much cheaper in Iowa (especially with an overbuilder in town).


Jack_in_VA
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join:2007-11-26
North, VA
kudos:1
My august usage was 830 kWh. Not bad for around 1500 sq/ft at 75 deg F.


IowaCowboy
Iowa native
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Springfield, MA
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said by Jack_in_VA:

My august usage was 830 kWh. Not bad for around 1500 sq/ft at 75 deg F.

My usage was 836 kWh last month for a 936 sq ft house. Average temp was 73. One of the problems I have is my bedroom is on the east side of the building (takes the morning sun) and the duplex has wood siding that is stained a dark color along with a black roof (absorbs the heat) so I am running the bedroom A/C constantly (even when it is mild). The gadgets I have in the bedroom (cable modem, computer, DVR, HDTV, and a printer) also generate heat.

If I bought this building, I would get a lighter color roof and either paint the siding white or put on new vinyl siding that is a lighter color to reflect the heat.
--
I wish I still lived in Iowa; Everything there from rent and groceries to Cable TV is much cheaper in Iowa (especially with an overbuilder in town).

pandora
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join:2001-06-01
Outland
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reply to IowaCowboy
said by IowaCowboy:

I don't know what part of the country you live in but if you lived in the Northeast (New England states/New York), your electric bills would be through the roof. I live in Massachusetts and I pay twice as much per month for my side of the duplex than my former neighbor pays for a single family home in Iowa. Connecticut has even worse electric rates than we do in Massachusetts, and Maine is more reasonable. Of course I've changed almost every light with CFL/LED light bulbs (the only place I don't use CFL light bulbs is the full bath because the steam from the shower murders CFL bulbs so I use traditional incandescent light bulbs there) and my electric bills are still high.

Connecticut Light and Power (and I suspect it's mirror image on the other side of the state) has created a virtually incomprehensible billing system.

We do get to pick our electric provider, but CL&P charges for transmission through it's wires. The charges for CL&P are higher than the electric rates.

The "generation rate" I pay is about 7.2 cents per KWh. However, transmission, and various taxes and mystery fees raise that to nearly 20 cents per KWh. As I just lowered my rate to 7.2 cents from 8.0, I won't be able to compute the new rate until a bill comes. However it'll be in the range of 18 to 20 cents per KWh.

Connecticut is very NIMBY. Some of our richer towns, refused to have new overhead lines installed (an eyesore) the cost of burying the lines is many times higher than running them overhead. We are assessed a monthly cost for the burying of cables, the nearest of which is about 25 miles from my home, and none of the buried cables provide power to my town or any town near me.

We also have some sort of federal punishment fee added to our bills due to failure to generate locally. I believe this is about 8% of the transmission bill. Nobody will permit any new electrical generation in any town. The last effort I recall was in New Milford, it was to be a natural gas plant with oil as a backup in the event of loss of natural gas. Turns out the location (on top of a hill) was bad, because the slightly higher CO2 could run down into a nearby river and deprive the poor fish of air. To the best of my recollection no science was ever presented to prove that true, but it is the sort of nonsense that happens here all the time.

Everyone wants great infrastructure, but nobody wants it near their home.
--
"People demand freedom of speech as a compensation for the freedom of thought which they seldom use."


fifty nine

join:2002-09-25
Sussex, NJ
kudos:2
reply to IowaCowboy
said by IowaCowboy:

said by pandora:

Our last electric bill for the older (smaller home, 3,200 sq ft) was about 2600 KWH over 28 days. 93 KWH per day, 3.8 KW per hour if all use was average.

I don't know what part of the country you live in but if you lived in the Northeast (New England states/New York), your electric bills would be through the roof. I live in Massachusetts and I pay twice as much per month for my side of the duplex than my former neighbor pays for a single family home in Iowa. Connecticut has even worse electric rates than we do in Massachusetts, and Maine is more reasonable. Of course I've changed almost every light with CFL/LED light bulbs (the only place I don't use CFL light bulbs is the full bath because the steam from the shower murders CFL bulbs so I use traditional incandescent light bulbs there) and my electric bills are still high.

5000 square feet is going to cost a lot to heat/cool. We have 2700 here and our electric bill averages around $150 in the summer. I don't do any budget billing nonsense because I like having a lower bill in the winter (we use wood and propane) and like to see what effect rate hikes have.


IowaCowboy
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Springfield, MA
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1 edit
said by fifty nine:

said by IowaCowboy:

said by pandora:

Our last electric bill for the older (smaller home, 3,200 sq ft) was about 2600 KWH over 28 days. 93 KWH per day, 3.8 KW per hour if all use was average.

I don't know what part of the country you live in but if you lived in the Northeast (New England states/New York), your electric bills would be through the roof. I live in Massachusetts and I pay twice as much per month for my side of the duplex than my former neighbor pays for a single family home in Iowa. Connecticut has even worse electric rates than we do in Massachusetts, and Maine is more reasonable. Of course I've changed almost every light with CFL/LED light bulbs (the only place I don't use CFL light bulbs is the full bath because the steam from the shower murders CFL bulbs so I use traditional incandescent light bulbs there) and my electric bills are still high.

5000 square feet is going to cost a lot to heat/cool. We have 2700 here and our electric bill averages around $150 in the summer. I don't do any budget billing nonsense because I like having a lower bill in the winter (we use wood and propane) and like to see what effect rate hikes have.

For our 936 sq ft unit, the electric bill in the summer (running two room air conditioner units) is about $90 per month. In the winter, it usually goes over $200 per month and has been as high as $350 one month in January of 2004. There is a built in air conditioner (through the wall unit) provided by the landlord but the unit is so old (dates back to 1988, when the building was built) that we use a portable air conditioner in the living room (that is so much cheaper to run). In the bedroom, I have a window unit.

As for the discussion on generators, I bought a generator during the October snowstorm and I did not have to use it as power was restored a few hours later after being out three days. I am in the process of installing a manual transfer switch in the main panel. I have the switch installed and I just need to wire the inlet box. I am powering essential circuits (downstairs heat, lights, fridge). Sure beats using a so-called "suicide cord" to backfeed a generator into the house (as those will burn the house down, fry the appliances/gadgets in the neighbor's unit, or fry a utility worker). I make an effort to do things properly and in a workman like manner. I have some holes leftover from a Sattellite tv antenna that I no longer use to run the inlet box but I might drill in the front of the house and use PVC conduit to run the power inlet box. The tv holes are in the back of the house and I want to put the inlet box in front to save wire as 10/3 is very expensive.

As for installing a generator transfer switch in a rental, I have a medical condition that may be life threatening in an outage. I am going to plug the medical equipment into a UPS that will give me time to switch the power over to the portable genset. I also have the a medical alert on file with the poco so they will notify me by phone if outages may be possible. We have rarely had outages up until last year when it went out twice (once lasting three days in October), and with my worsening health, we got the portable genset. It seems that the weather here is getting more extreme. We had really bad weather last year, the Jun 1st tornado (not a common sight here), Irene, and the October snowstorm.

We've lived at our house for ten years and don't plan on moving anytime soon.

--
I wish I still lived in Iowa; Everything there from rent and groceries to Cable TV is much cheaper in Iowa (especially with an overbuilder in town).