dslreports logo
site
 
    All Forums Hot Topics Gallery
spc

spacer




how-to block ads


Search Topic:
uniqs
4978
share rss forum feed


Blackbird
Built for Speed
Premium
join:2005-01-14
Fort Wayne, IN
kudos:3
Reviews:
·Frontier Communi..
reply to plencnerb

Re: [WIN8] Windows 8 --- What benifits over W7-64?

said by plencnerb:

... there is the side that Microsoft wants to try to have the same interface on all your devices, regardless of what it is (the whole reason behind Metro, as far as I can tell). If you're using a Windows Phone, Smartphone, Tablet, Desktop, Surface Table, or Laptop, your "User Interface" is the same.

The strategm of aiming for the same interface on all devices is a Microsoft corporate tactical decision designed to increase market share/dominance across those devices... to my observation, it has not been "demanded" by users in the marketplace, particularly the desktop-using universe.
said by plencnerb:

... While allowing the end user to select their "start" GUI, Microsoft may have felt that if they give the end user the choice, few people would actually use it, which would defeat the purpose of having a new interface.

If users were to largely opt out of the Metro UI, then it would certainly prove it was never demanded by them. Instead, removal of choice is proof positive of Microsoft placing their corporate strategy ahead of meeting many users' wants/needs in their product. Not providing the user the opportunity to select their interface smacks of corporate arrogance: Microsoft will drag users kicking and screaming into a world that is dominated by Microsoft's one-size-fits-all corporate strategm aimed at cross-market domination, regardless of the wants and needs of a whole class of desktop users whose productivity will seriously suffer as a result. This is the same pathway they chose with the ribbon concept in Office products, and at least for some time, user productivity has suffered... but that's not a cost element Microsoft has to deal with; instead, users have to.
said by plencnerb:

... So, I feel Microsoft is in a sort of "rock and a hard place" with this. The question they probably asked themselves is which group of people do we upset? That can be a tough decision to make, as every person is your customer, and if at all possible, you don't want to upset any customer.

The only rock and hard place Microsoft is in has been a place they've chosen to put themselves. Nowhere is there written some natural requirement that all products must have the same interfaces. When I use a phone, I don't expect it to look or work just like an FM radio, nor do I expect a desktop computer to look or work just like a cell phone. In areas where their usages do overlap, there's no reason on earth why the interfaces can't be similar in those usage cases. But an interface that makes sense on a handheld (with its micro-display) makes no inherent sense on a computer used for... computing.
said by plencnerb:

... Finally, there is the side of this that goes along with change. Its a new version, new interface. You either adapt and learn, or you get left behind.

I have no inherent problem with change, other than that it costs. So I want that cost to be truly needful, not just to enhance the corporate master strategy of somebody else. Whenever a major change is made in how work is done, especially repetitive work like usually performed on a computer, there is both an immediate and a lingering negative impact on efficiency in doing that work... and loss of efficiency carries a cost in time, output, and dollars. This was one of the most immediate negative impacts in the business environment from MS switching Office software to the ribbon instead of menus, and it will have a similar costly impact in changing how the desktop looks and acts. But Microsoft will not experience the costs... its users will. Unless the changes to how a class of software has long worked are truly necessary for sound, cost-effective, technical reasons, they will result in wasted resources. It should prove illuminating to watch how readily business accepts Windows8, considering the negative impact to corporate user training and ongoing productivity.

A real question is what the tangible, real-world benefits of Win8 might be? Especially to the desktop using world, particularly those whose computer usage is heavily into "computing", business, etc.
--
"Is life so dear, or peace so sweet, as to be purchased at the price of chains and slavery? Forbid it, Almighty God!" -- P.Henry, 1775


JohnInSJ
Premium
join:2003-09-22
Aptos, CA
reply to Jan Janowski

Of course one real benefit of W8 over W7 would be if you were running the OS on a touch enabled desktop/laptop. Which will be all of the new ones.
--
My place : »www.schettino.us



Jan Janowski
Premium
join:2000-06-18
Skokie, IL
Reviews:
·Comcast

1 recommendation

(Touch Enabled) No, I upgraded to a Jog/Shuttle knob in W98/XT, and that allows me to build macros per button... Touch... No... That doesn't give me any improvements over Keyboard shortcuts, JogShuttle Knob, and/or Mouse control...

The whole point of my post is not for a new computer.... but is it worth the $$ to upgrade existing computer? The XT to W7-64 had very obvious feature Improvements that I'm not seeing in W8... XT to W7-64 was a "No-Brainer".... and I jumped...

These 'No-Brainer' features that I'm searching for in W8.... (That jumped right out to be Obvious in W7) seem to be lacking... That was the whole point of my post...

Still Searching.....

--
Looking for 1939 Indian Motocycle



BillRoland
Premium
join:2001-01-21
Ocala, FL
kudos:3
Reviews:
·Cox HSI
reply to JohnInSJ

said by JohnInSJ:

Of course one real benefit of W8 over W7 would be if you were running the OS on a touch enabled desktop/laptop. Which will be all of the new ones.

I really fail to see why anybody would resort to smearing greasy fingers all over the screen of their laptop/desktop when they have a superior input method available in front of them, aka a keyboard and mouse/trackpad. I've tried to be open minded about it, I really have, but...
--
Ron Paul 2012 »www.ronpaul2012.com
Beyond AM. Beyond FM. (((XM)))

Glen T

join:2003-11-03
BC

said by BillRoland:

I really fail to see why anybody would resort to smearing greasy fingers all over the screen of their laptop/desktop when they have a superior input method available in front of them, aka a keyboard and mouse/trackpad. I've tried to be open minded about it, I really have, but...

Ergonomically, it doesn't work in a normal office setting. I chuckle when I watch Daily Planet on Discovery channel, the tech segment, with their big wall display and grand, exagerated gestures, to open a window (probably powered by something like Kinect). It would give you a full body workout, but I can't see doing it all day long.

OZO
Premium
join:2003-01-17
kudos:2
reply to BillRoland

said by BillRoland:

said by JohnInSJ:

Of course one real benefit of W8 over W7 would be if you were running the OS on a touch enabled desktop/laptop. Which will be all of the new ones.

I really fail to see why anybody would resort to smearing greasy fingers all over the screen of their laptop/desktop when they have a superior input method available in front of them, aka a keyboard and mouse/trackpad. I've tried to be open minded about it, I really have, but...

Absolutely...

I don't know how the people will be able to work with it all day long. Just try to imagine you have to keep your hands not on the top of your desk, but constantly pointing with their fingers to something on the screen.... It's weird how the designers of new (and "preferred" now user interface) don't see any problems here. Don't they know some (if not many) people are buying keyboard and mouse pads to rest their palms on during all day of their work with computers? Why do they're doing that? It's because they are getting tired. And now they have to lift their hands to rich the screen directly... IMO It's dumb (from ergonomic perspective) to force people to do it whole day long.

There is a place for UI for smartphone and there is a place (and the need) for UI for old desktop environment (proven by many years to work just well in business environments). Forcing the new UI will shoot MS in the foot and push businesses to invest in another OS's. Is that the goal behind this change?
--
Keep it simple, it'll become complex by itself...


JohnInSJ
Premium
join:2003-09-22
Aptos, CA
reply to BillRoland

said by BillRoland:

said by JohnInSJ:

Of course one real benefit of W8 over W7 would be if you were running the OS on a touch enabled desktop/laptop. Which will be all of the new ones.

I really fail to see why anybody would resort to smearing greasy fingers all over the screen of their laptop/desktop when they have a superior input method available in front of them, aka a keyboard and mouse/trackpad. I've tried to be open minded about it, I really have, but...

Yep. If you use touch devices for everything else (tablets, phones, ereaders) and then sit in front of your compute device, your natural inclination to continue doing the same actions to achieve the same results is there. Especially for non-technical people (you know, the ones who spend the most money on stuff.) The "smearing" thing - you wipe the glass now and then
--
My place : »www.schettino.us


JohnInSJ
Premium
join:2003-09-22
Aptos, CA
reply to Jan Janowski

said by Jan Janowski:

The whole point of my post is not for a new computer.... but is it worth the $$ to upgrade existing computer?

And the answer has been given. If you need or want any of the new features, yes. If not, no. For you, it's a no (at release, anyway.)
--
My place : »www.schettino.us


Ericthorn
It only hurts when I laugh
Premium
join:2001-08-10
Paragould, AR
Reviews:
·Paragould.net
·Paragould.net
reply to Jan Janowski

The only reason I'll be running an 8 machine at home is simply for support purposes. Same reason I still run a stand alone XP rig. After playing with it a bit in a vm, there is just nothing there to make me change. I was on XP for years before I changed to 7, and that was only because a game I wanted to play needed Direct X 10, so I had to cave. It's pissed me off to no end that I now have to dual boot 7 and XP because one of my favorite games simply will not run reliably on 7. The company i work at is not going to move to 8, but we are going to have one rig running 8 for the customers that call and we need to help them navigate their own PC. I have firmly railed against this, as we do not support Windows. We support a custom POS system, and it's the customers job to know how to navigate their PC outside of our POS. But invariably we end up having to help customers in their Windows environment.

I feel like Walter saying 'pisses me off'

I guess it keeps the bills getting paid.
--
Ever try stuffing a melted marshmallow up a wildcat's ass? It can be done, but you have to like your job. - This Is The Way The World Ends by James Morrow - Join a DC club, it can't hurt you!



BillRoland
Premium
join:2001-01-21
Ocala, FL
kudos:3
Reviews:
·Cox HSI
reply to JohnInSJ

said by JohnInSJ:

said by BillRoland:

said by JohnInSJ:

Of course one real benefit of W8 over W7 would be if you were running the OS on a touch enabled desktop/laptop. Which will be all of the new ones.

I really fail to see why anybody would resort to smearing greasy fingers all over the screen of their laptop/desktop when they have a superior input method available in front of them, aka a keyboard and mouse/trackpad. I've tried to be open minded about it, I really have, but...

Yep. If you use touch devices for everything else (tablets, phones, ereaders) and then sit in front of your compute device, your natural inclination to continue doing the same actions to achieve the same results is there. Especially for non-technical people (you know, the ones who spend the most money on stuff.) The "smearing" thing - you wipe the glass now and then

I guess all I can say is "we'll see." I wouldn't bet my house on Windows 8 being a raving success.
--
Ron Paul 2012 »www.ronpaul2012.com
Beyond AM. Beyond FM. (((XM)))

Glen T

join:2003-11-03
BC
reply to Jan Janowski

I don't even like the touch pad on my laptops. It's so inprecise and I find it tiring. Not that I use my laptop keyboard either. I have external mice and keyboards at home and at work.

I use a mouse for everything. It is very precise and economical in terms of movement. I have the mouse scroll wheel set to scroll one visible page length per wheel increment. I can quickly scroll thought any document with small, precise movements and not miss anything, all with both of my palms resting comfortably and my elbows at the ergonomically recommended 90 degree angle.

I can't even image trying to select and highlight a few words of text to cut and paste to another location using a touch interface and touch keyboard. It would drive me nuts.

When I'm travelling, I can barely stand composing a 20 word e-mail on my Playbook. Sure, its fine for writing "i'll get back 2 u" But it would be hell trying to edit a 30 page proposal with graphics and screen captures.



JohnInSJ
Premium
join:2003-09-22
Aptos, CA
reply to BillRoland

said by BillRoland:

I guess all I can say is "we'll see." I wouldn't bet my house on Windows 8 being a raving success.

Microsoft is, along with many other big bets, all related.
--
My place : »www.schettino.us


Octavean
Premium,MVM
join:2001-03-31
New York, NY
kudos:1
reply to Jan Janowski

XP came out in 2001 or something like that. Windows 7 came out in 2009. Is it not a possibility that those people that held-out on XP are just apt to hold onto an OS they feel comfortable with for as long as they think it possible? In this case up to ~8 years or so maybe more.

Some people will use a pair of underwear until it disintegrates off their body whereas others will toss away a pair of underwear at the first sign of overuse (or buy a new pair just for the heck of it).

So for some it may not be a question of features of a new OS but one of habit.


Glen T

join:2003-11-03
BC

1 edit

In practice, we hang on to old computers until the threat of hardware failure induces us to upgrade to new hardware. And then we get the flavour of Windows of the day that comes with it. We are usually not motivated by the need for higher performance and never motivated by the need for new features (with the exception of WPA2 support on a couple of old netbooks).

The only OS's that we have actively avoided (so far) were Vista and ME. We actually bought 7 used PCs with XP Pro licenses during the Vista period, largely because we didn't want to replace all of our peripherals (printers, scanners, etc.) at the same time. Half of our machines are still running XP. The other half are Win7.



MM Blues

join:2001-10-27
Hightstown, NJ
reply to redxii

I happen to like the W8 Preview Version so far. It's not only a "tablet version" OS. You can easily access your desktop on your computer from the "home" screen.

It runs faster and crisper on my Dell laptop than any other version of windows so far (Intel 5 first generation, 8 GB memory, ATI 5400 series dedicated graphics)

As far as Windows Media Center goes, check here: »news.cnet.com/8301-10805_3-57445···preview/


dave
Premium,MVM
join:2000-05-04
not in ohio
kudos:8
Reviews:
·Verizon FiOS

1 edit
reply to JohnInSJ

I don't see why everyone assumes it's "keyboard and mouse" versus "touch screen".

The mouse is just a hack because we don't have touch screens. Before mice, we used light pens, which was just a hack to simulate touch screens. (Light pens failed, in my opinion, because they were fatiguing to use - they were pretty heavy).

I'd remind you all that the point of pointer devices is to point at something on the screen. Pointing your finger is more natural than moving a device that moves a pointer to the thing you want pointed at.

The winning combination to me looks like keyboard and touch screen.

Agreed that the 'smear' problem is a problem, though. Ditto the precision problem, though perhaps a stylus might be the answer.

But most of you luddites seem to have fixated on the only pointer device you know as the ultimate in pointer devices. It ain't. It's just a very very successful hack.



urbanriot
Premium
join:2004-10-18
Canada
kudos:3
Reviews:
·Cogeco Cable
reply to Glen T

said by Glen T:

Ergonomically, it doesn't work in a normal office setting.

What, people find it inefficient in offices to swipe the right bar, tap settings, tap power, tap shut down in Windows 8

vs.

Start. Shutdown in Windows 7?

The Windows 8 method seems to go well with a heavily paperworked corporate environment that has management forms for every task imaginable.

OZO
Premium
join:2003-01-17
kudos:2

1 edit
reply to dave

said by dave:

Pointing your finger is more natural than moving a device that moves a pointer to the thing you want pointed at.

Really? Is that so simple? And you failed to see any difference here?

Mouse is precise pointing device. You can point to one pixel on the screen. People who do graphic work, make icons, etc know how important it is. People who do simple text editing know it too. Even windows borders has just couple of pixels in width, But with mouse you can easily point on the border and change its size in a snap.

Finger, on the other hand (actually on both hands ) can point only on a small area (5x5px or bigger, depending on the size of your finger and how much beer you had) and never on one pixel.

That difference required complete re-design of UI. UI for fingers can't replace UI that was designed with precise mouse pointer in mind. Thus, you don't have windows, where you can't change their sizes - you have big tails and full screen applications instead. Of course you still can handle it with precise mouse pointer, but what's the point? It's like hammering nails with a microscope - it may work (device is heavy and feel metal in some parts) too, but again, what's the point to do it this way?

Finally, regards to point of pointing on something on the screen and is it natural or not. It could be considered natural for 1 year old child. But when one has ever tried to move mouse in front of computer and see what it does on the screen it becomes as natural as any other actions. It's like you have to try to ride a bike (and may not consider it natural at first time), but after a little practice you start thinking that it's actually natural for you (you don't need to think how to do it when you do it)...
--
Keep it simple, it'll become complex by itself...

dave
Premium,MVM
join:2000-05-04
not in ohio
kudos:8
Reviews:
·Verizon FiOS

Yeah, yeah, I get all that - that's why I said "there is a precision problem" or words to that effect.

What I'm talking about is the sheer ludditeism exhibited here, the notion that there can never be anything better than what we have today. This is not a claim that Windows 8 is better than Windows 7. I don't plan to upgrade existing systems myself.

My topic was 'I don't see why everyone assumes it's "keyboard and mouse" versus "touch screen"'.



Octavean
Premium,MVM
join:2001-03-31
New York, NY
kudos:1
reply to Jan Janowski

I thought this was an interesting read:

Why I Still Use Windows Or: the countdown to a fresh Start.



JohnInSJ
Premium
join:2003-09-22
Aptos, CA
reply to urbanriot

said by urbanriot:

said by Glen T:

Ergonomically, it doesn't work in a normal office setting.

What, people find it inefficient in offices to swipe the right bar, tap settings, tap power, tap shut down in Windows 8

vs.

Start. Shutdown in Windows 7?

The Windows 8 method seems to go well with a heavily paperworked corporate environment that has management forms for every task imaginable.

I just click an icon I made, which is a shortcut to the shutdown (and restart) command line commands. They're tiles, too. Or I press the power button (which is set to "shutdown" as its action. Or close the lid for sleep.
--
My place : »www.schettino.us

Glen T

join:2003-11-03
BC

2 edits
reply to dave

said by dave:

Yeah, yeah, I get all that - that's why I said "there is a precision problem" or words to that effect.

What I'm talking about is the sheer ludditeism exhibited here, the notion that there can never be anything better than what we have today. This is not a claim that Windows 8 is better than Windows 7. I don't plan to upgrade existing systems myself.

My topic was 'I don't see why everyone assumes it's "keyboard and mouse" versus "touch screen"'.

The topic is if there is a benefit in Win 8 over Win 7. If we all agree that the interface formerly known as Metro is the main benefit, then I have to answer, no, because touch screen computing does not make my job easier. And spending extra time working around a GUI that puts touch screen computing up front and center, does not make my job easier.

Show me touch computing where my hands are resting in an argonomically correct position, with my elbows at a 90 degree angle, while my head is held at a comfortable angle (neck not bent with head looking down) and I have precise control over the cursor at all times, and I'll see the benefit and stop being a luddite.

Maybe in Corning's vision of the future, but I think that we are a ways off of that (and note the lack of an intrusive OS):

»www.youtube.com/watch?v=jZkHpNnX···youtu.be


P.S. Another issue is that I use 1920 x 1200 resolutions screens (which are getting harder to find as vendors are chopping vertical resolution to match HD formats). In order for a 24" UXGA screen to be comfortably in my field of view (progressive lenses require more head turning/scanning) it is just beyond my reach, making touch screens absolutely useless to me.


sholling
Premium
join:2002-02-13
Hemet, CA
kudos:1
reply to Glen T

said by Glen T:

The same thing happened with the ribbon bar in MS Office. Given the choice, most users would not use it. Why? Because, for experienced users, it actually reduces their productivity. The ribbon bar is still having a negative impact on my productivity in programs like Excel.

This is a marketing decision, not a usability decision. The interface formerly known as Metro is a one-size-fits-none solution imposed by a company that is once again releasing a "Me Too" product that is too little and too late. The only way that they can ensure adoption is to impose adoption on hapless desktop users.

I agree completely - I hate the ribbon bar and Metro and I don't see any reason to have to forget everything I know about Windows and Office every time somebody in Redmond get's the bright idea to change the interface for no reason that benefits the customer. As far as I'm concerned Metro is MS Bob 2013 and will have exactly the same level of acceptance in the corporate world.
--
"Government is the great fiction, through which everybody endeavors to live at the expense of everybody else."
--FREDERIC BASTIAT--

OZO
Premium
join:2003-01-17
kudos:2
reply to Glen T

said by Glen T:

The topic is if there is a benefit in Win 8 over Win 7. If we all agree that the interface formerly known as Metro is the main benefit, then I have to answer, no, because touch screen computing does not make my job easier. And spending extra time working around a GUI that puts touch screen computing up front and center, does not make my job easier.

Show me touch computing where my hands are resting in an argonomically correct position, with my elbows at a 90 degree angle, while my head is held at a comfortable angle (neck not bent with head looking down) and I have precise control over the cursor at all times, and I'll see the benefit and stop being a luddite.

And one more thing about touch interface, that should be mentioned here. Along it's being imprecise (pointing to a big spot, not to one pixel), being against all ergonomic recommendations and requiring to clean the screen from greasy smudges, playing with smartphone a lot, I found it completely unreliable. You touch the screen and you never know if your touch is accepted as input or not (due to low pressure, brief time, etc). If you're lucky the button you touch will become green for a short while and it actually may help you to recognize, that input was accepted. But in many cases I touch it, I wait it for the action, there is nothing happened and I touch it again ... just to discover, that at the very same moment image of the button was replaced with a new button, that takes that input as a request for a new action (which I don't want/expect)...

There is a reason, why mouse has buttons, that click (hint - to give you feedback). It's the very same reason, why a good keyboard has a distinctive feedback too, BTW. There is no such thing with touch screens. Thus to make the UI work more reliable, it should be redesigned and many confirmation dialog boxes should be added for every critical action. That is also useful in cases when I may accidentally touch my smart phone screen without intention to do anything.

Bottom line the touch screen interface is (additionally to other problems mentioned earlier) unreliable and therefore requires a different UI, that is specifically designed with that "feature" in mind. That's one more reason why I don't want / need W8 on my desktop.
--
Keep it simple, it'll become complex by itself...


workablob

join:2004-06-09
Houston, TX
kudos:3
Reviews:
·Comcast
reply to Jan Janowski

I've been using it exclusively for my work PC for a couple (maybe 3) weeks) and after installing Stardock Start8 honestly It's sometimes hard to remember I'm not running Windows 7.

If I had to pay to upgrade I would not bother.

It has some nice features that Win7 does not have but if my boss told me tomorrow I could not run 8 I would go back to Win 7 without a thought.

This is the RTM version I am running.

Dave
--
I may have been born yesterday. But it wasn't at night.



kickass69

join:2002-06-03
Lake Hopatcong, NJ

1 edit

Once Stardock's Start8 comes out of beta though...it'll end up costing $4.99. This sets a bad precedent having to pay for features that were once part of the OS to have it work productively as it did before.

Sure there's Classic Shell out there thankfully, but once Windows 7 is past its prime and IF Microsoft continues with this and gets rid of the desktop interface altogether, what then?



btB

@rr.com
reply to Jan Janowski

The Desktop is there for legacy purposes. If you remove it, then you literally have WinRT.

Start8's start menu replacement looks exactly like Windows 7. It even has some Aero effects. Freebie Classic Shell is fine though. Seriously, debating the interface at this stage of the game is a waste of time as either of these 2 options will satisfy 99% of the users out there.

Anyway, the purpose of of Windows 8 is not something MS created just so they can sell you an upgrade. Likewise, it is also not just Windows 7 without a start button and replaced with Metro.

Reason for Windows 8 in the first place is that Microsoft is afraid of the term Apple term "post PC" that everybody accepts. All the so-called tech experts say that everybody will be soon be using non-PC devices that uses a mobile OS. Microsoft realized that those specs can actually run Windows. That means people can do real computing on something with mobile hardware.

Hence, Windows 8 is Microsoft's mobile OS meaning that it is capable of running on mobile hardware. With a mobile OS, you expect things like faster boot and longer battery life. Even traditional non-touch screen devices benefit from these types of improvements.

The biggest difference in this new version of Windows is that you get another OS. That is you get x86 WinRT that can run its own apps. Those apps are more commonly known as Metro/Windows 8 apps.



workablob

join:2004-06-09
Houston, TX
kudos:3
Reviews:
·Comcast
reply to kickass69

said by kickass69:

Once Stardock's Start8 comes out of beta though...it'll end up costing $4.99. This sets a bad precedent having to pay for features that were once part of the OS to have it work productively as it did before.

Sure there's Classic Shell out there thankfully, but once Windows 7 is past it's prime and IF Microsoft continues with this and gets rid of the desktop interface altogether, what then?

Start8 free expired a couple of days ago so I shelled out the 4.99.

I go through 5 buck attomizers on my eCig like water so not a big deal.

But you are very correct. Windows 8 on the desktop is going to plummet like a stone just like Microsoft Flight did, as I predicted.
»Microsoft Flight Gimme A Break

Dave
--
I may have been born yesterday. But it wasn't at night.


JohnInSJ
Premium
join:2003-09-22
Aptos, CA

said by workablob:

But you are very correct. Windows 8 on the desktop is going to plummet like a stone just like Microsoft Flight did, as I predicted.
»Microsoft Flight Gimme A Break

Been using it since it became available on MSDN on several machines. It takes about 10 minutes of actual use to get used to the differences. Doubtful any plummeting will happen. People will do what they always do - get the new OS when they get new hardware (and some pretty nifty hardware will be coming out for this OS) while corps will do their normal three year cycle, so they'll skip win8 and continue their slow grind to win7 (HP will be getting there THIS year, according to the handful of folks I know that still work there. Wow) and a smaller group of people will upgrade. Maybe more with the low upgrade price, but more is still not many.
--
My place : »www.schettino.us


workablob

join:2004-06-09
Houston, TX
kudos:3
Reviews:
·Comcast

said by JohnInSJ:

said by workablob:

But you are very correct. Windows 8 on the desktop is going to plummet like a stone just like Microsoft Flight did, as I predicted.
»Microsoft Flight Gimme A Break

Been using it since it became available on MSDN on several machines. It takes about 10 minutes of actual use to get used to the differences. Doubtful any plummeting will happen. People will do what they always do - get the new OS when they get new hardware (and some pretty nifty hardware will be coming out for this OS) while corps will do their normal three year cycle, so they'll skip win8 and continue their slow grind to win7 (HP will be getting there THIS year, according to the handful of folks I know that still work there. Wow) and a smaller group of people will upgrade. Maybe more with the low upgrade price, but more is still not many.

Plummet was a bit extreme.

I believe 8 will be as successful on the PC especially corp PC as Vista.

I had no problem with Vista and 7 was basically Vista done properly.

Our company is in the process of deploying 7 to get rid of XP so we milk the OS for as long as possible.

Dave
--
I may have been born yesterday. But it wasn't at night.