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septcasey

join:2006-09-07
United State

Google Earth used up almost 400MB in 20 minutes.

I have the Google Earth program downloaded on my desktop and I wanted to check it for restaurants local to me because my birthday is in 2 days and I wanted to see whats out there for a new place for me to eat at. Well I opened Google Earth, having almost 400MB download allowance left for the day. Less than 20 minutes later I noticed it was all used up. My only guess is that Google Earth did it. But why? How? Hughesnet, if I can't even use Google Earth for a few minutes without being punished by you then why am I even still with your service?

Why does Google Earth use so much data?



Nimblewill

join:2007-08-17
Dahlonega, GA

I've never seen Google Earth downloading anything like 400 megs in 20 minutes.
I suggest you check for malware. Download Free Malwarebytes at »www.malwarebytes.org/products/ma···es_free/ Install and run a full scan.



septcasey

join:2006-09-07
United State

I find it quite interesting that one of the very few websites I can go to without any problems at all when FAP'd is the restore token page. I can't even load Facebook, Google and many other websites when this happens. I have to restart my modem to load Facebook but it only lets me access it for about 30 seconds before it won't load anymore until I restart the modem again.


sharkyyoung
Premium
join:2012-03-15
Reno, NV

What are you running a 7000 or 9000, if is a 7000 than other people have been having problems also.



septcasey

join:2006-09-07
United State

HN9000. Every time I go over download allowance for the day the most common websites are not accessible. Facebook, Google, E-mail... Maybe its just my browser, FireFox. I'm thinking of going back to IE.


tobicat
Premium
join:2005-04-18
Tombstone, AZ
reply to septcasey

And how many of those resturants did you click on and download their menues and whatever? I suspect that uses more than google earth.
--
7000S SatMex 5 1050, Dlink wirless


sharkyyoung
Premium
join:2012-03-15
Reno, NV
reply to septcasey

said by septcasey:

HN9000. Every time I go over download allowance for the day the most common websites are not accessible. Facebook, Google, E-mail... Maybe its just my browser, FireFox. I'm thinking of going back to IE.

I use IE have have no problems, stopped using FF long ago.


septcasey

join:2006-09-07
United State
reply to tobicat

said by tobicat:

And how many of those resturants did you click on and download their menues and whatever? I suspect that uses more than google earth.

None. I viewed over 1 town and zoomed in to about 2 restaurants. I watched a few minutes of the news then looked back, checked the download allowance and saw it was used up. I don't know why. Maybe it was Google Earth, maybe not. The whole download allowance system is a mystery to me. I wish Hughesnet would understand their custoemrs don't want download banks and restore tokens. We want more download allowance thats fit for this day and age.

sharkyyoung
Premium
join:2012-03-15
Reno, NV

In that case you will like Gen4.



septcasey

join:2006-09-07
United State

said by sharkyyoung:

In that case you will like Gen4.

Gen4 should be given to all current users instead of having to agree to go with another 2 year contract. They didn't sell it to me because as I've said and will continue to say, Hughesnet members don't want new satellites, download banks or faster speeds. We want this HSI company to be a HSI company.


Doc Lithius

join:2009-08-19
Rock, MI

1 edit
reply to septcasey

said by septcasey:

The whole download allowance system is a mystery to me.

... seriously? Because I understood it from day one. And you've been a Hughesnet customer for how long? Still, I'll humor you on this one and explain exactly how it works:

- Everyday, you get some amount of bandwidth for download usage. My plan gives me 525 MB per day at 5 AM ET. You can check your allowance and refill time here.
- As of earlier this year, most people also gained a "rollover bank," which is double your daily allowance and puts any unused bandwidth into reserve for the next day. For example, if I have 250 MB left over when 5 AM rolls around, I get another 525 MB. This comes to a total of 750 MB that I can use for that day.

- When you download something -- anything -- there's a 95% chance* it will affect your bandwidth for the day. For example, if have 500 MB left for the day and you download a 10 MB file, your daily allowance will now be 490 MB.
- As of some time in 2010, uploads do not effect your daily bandwidth allowance whatsoever. However, constantly uploading may affect your overall download speed.**

- When your bandwidth allowance hits 0, you will have exceeded your daily allowance for the day. When this happens, your download speeds will drop to roughly 5%-10% of what your current plan promises with further throttling on your connection speed if you continue to download things.** This will continue for 24 hours from the time when you exceeded your daily allowance. For example, if you hit 0 MB remaining at 6:46 PM on a Monday, your bandwidth will refresh at 6:46 PM on Tuesday.

- If you wish to forcefully refresh your daily bandwidth, you may do so by going here, typing in your SAN, and using one of the complimentary tokens given each month or a paid token. Complimentary tokens are awarded once per-month, but you can store up to six total. There is no limit to how many paid tokens you can store.***

- All types of downloads affect your remaining bandwidth. YouTube videos, online video games, browsing the internet, automatically-refreshing advertisements on web pages, certain types of malicious software ("malware"), and the sort.
- Some programs use more bandwidth than others. For example, typical use of Google Earth may use more bandwidth than AOL Instant Messenger while Minecraft may (used to?) use more bandwidth than World of Warcraft. This does not take into consideration software patches which will likely use considerably more bandwidth than typical software usage.
- Certain programs automatically update. Windows, Flash and Java are some of them. It's highly suggested you disable automatic updates, or at least switch them over to "notify me but don't download them," if you're worried about your bandwidth disappearing due to updates.

- It is your responsibility to monitor your own usage. HughesNet provides a tool (powered by Adobe AIR) to help with this, but the hnFAPAlert tool dbirdman is much more accurate and easier to understand. You can find a copy of this tool here, though at present time, it only works under Windows operating systems. MacOS and Linux users will have to stick with the Adobe AIR tool.

- The modem itself will occasionally send or receive data by itself. This is perfectly normal and should not significantly impact your daily bandwidth, unless a major firmware update (such as the kind users experience when getting a new modem) is shipped.

- If you suspect your computer is using more bandwidth than it should be, it's suggested you update and run the latest malware, spyware, and anti-virus software. You are solely responsible for making sure your computer is clear of bandwidth-eating viruses and the such.
- If you have multiple computers in your household which are connected to the internet while bandwidth is being depleted, troubleshoot them. Turn them off one-by-one to try and isolate which one is using the most bandwidth.

- If you're using a router, it's suggested you check the local network clients list to see if there are any unknown users tapping into your network.
- It's also suggested, if you're in a residential area, that you password protect your router so no one can hijack your connection and run your bandwidth down.

* There are numerous random times throughout the day where bandwidth is not deducted from your allowance. However, there's no way of knowing when these short windows of no-deduction will happen.
** Unconfirmed, but other users claim this has happened to them.
*** There may be a limit to paid tokens, but I've never heard of anyone reaching it.

----------
I think that about covers it.
--
ISP: HughesNet Satellite Internet
Modem Model: HN9000
Service Plan: Grandfathered ProPlus -- 425 MB + 100 MB/day, 1050 MB total, 1.6 Mbps DL; 250 Kbps UL)


septcasey

join:2006-09-07
United State

Firstly, I know what the download allowance system is. What I meant by its a mystery to me is its very existence. Why has Hughesnet gone through all the trouble to implement this punishment system instead of investing into better hardware that can accommodate their users? Its not good business to limit your service like this and you know it. When it comes to common sense in the ISP world, the only way to make it sound fair with a FAP is if you debate it like they do in politics. A democrat can do many good things but the republicans will only focus on the bad.



dbirdman
Premium,MVM
join:2003-07-07
usa
kudos:5

said by septcasey:

Why has Hughesnet gone through all the trouble to implement this punishment system instead of investing into better hardware that can accommodate their users?

Now it's my turn to say "Seriously?"

You think that all they had to do was to invent a money tree, throw a bunch of that at the sky, and all would be well? You are wrong, wrong, wrong, wrong!

First: There are orbital slots every two degrees in space. For the US, that is between roughly 70 east and 130 west. A total of 60 degrees and 30 slots. Everybody and his brother wants one, and some have high priority, like the US military. Then there's TV. Not just direct-to-home services (who use 6 slots), but the big dish folks that transmit the programming to the stations and cable providers. Lots of other uses as well. So, there are a dozen+ slots for Ku-Band internet, and so far about 5 for Ka-Band satellite. Slots are FCC-allocated, and cost big bucks.

Then you have the state of satellite technology. Until 7 or 8 years ago, all you could manage in a slot was about 1 gigabit. Then it went to 10 gigabits, and this year you can manage 100 gigabits in a single slot. That sounds like a lot, but it would not be enough to provide unlimited internet to even a single small city, let alone everybody in North America who is outside those cities.

So, even if you had all the money in the world (and they don't) they could not provide high limits to all of their customers. When you move it down to having only a billion or so dollars (mostly borrowed) you can't provide more than a tiny fraction of the data the customers would really like to have.

This is not new, and it will NEVER be solved because it is impossible to solve, both financially and logistically!

Any solution that provides real significant bandwidth will have to be terrestrial, not in the sky.

So, it is necessary to keep ALL satellite users from using any significant amount of data. FAP is the accepted way, by most providers. The ones that don't, charge hefty per-megabyte charges (not in the piddly $10 range) which also tends to self-govern.
--
Motosat self-pointing dishes: 1.2-meter XF-3 on 93W, .74 meter G74 on 127W, SL-5 HD DirecTV|idirect 3100|Hughes HN7000S|Verizon UMW190 Air Card|1990 Blue Bird Wanderlodge Bus "Blue Thunder"|Author of hnFAP-Alert, PC-OPI and DSSatTool


septcasey

join:2006-09-07
United State

So does Hughesnet care to compete with only other satellite ISPs or are they trying to compete with the entire ISP world? They have enough bandwidth up there to supply new customers but for some reason they don't seem to have enough to supply current customers with anything more than their package deal. I'm sorry but you can explain it to me any way you like but I will never believe this kind of internet is fair and you know you're on the losing side of this debate.



dbirdman
Premium,MVM
join:2003-07-07
usa
kudos:5

We are arguing reality (and we win that big time). You are arguing "fair."

Fair is in the mind of the beholder. There are a few places where fair does not exist (although marketers will often tout their unfairness as being fair because it sounds good). Those places are business, government, and life itself. If somehow you have reached an age where you are able to post on the internet and have not yet learned that life is not fair, I'm sorry to disillusion you.
--
Motosat self-pointing dishes: 1.2-meter XF-3 on 93W, .74 meter G74 on 127W, SL-5 HD DirecTV|idirect 3100|Hughes HN7000S|Verizon UMW190 Air Card|1990 Blue Bird Wanderlodge Bus "Blue Thunder"|Author of hnFAP-Alert, PC-OPI and DSSatTool



septcasey

join:2006-09-07
United State

said by dbirdman:

We are arguing reality (and we win that big time). You are arguing "fair."

Fair is in the mind of the beholder. There are a few places where fair does not exist (although marketers will often tout their unfairness as being fair because it sounds good). Those places are business, government, and life itself. If somehow you have reached an age where you are able to post on the internet and have not yet learned that life is not fair, I'm sorry to disillusion you.

The water satellite ISPs sell does not quench. However, you can bring any kind of water to dehydrated people and most of them will buy it. The reality is, this is true. Is it fair to take advantage of people this way? Certainly not.

Hughesnet needs to look at the big picture. Wired and tower wireless internet is spread to new places everyday and people do not hesitate to drop their satellite ISP for that. If Hughesnet wants to stay in business in the near future, my suggestion is they should really start to make changes to keep their customers. The price is too high and the download allowance is too low. If you see the storm coming, prepare for it.


Doc Lithius

join:2009-08-19
Rock, MI
reply to septcasey

I think you might be under the impression HughesNet is trying to market itself to the general consumer... If you watch any of their commercials, they specifically say things like "Tired of slow dial-up, but don't think you can get fast Internet where you live?" in every single one of their commercials. They know that, despite the fact some high-up congressman (whose name escapes me) set aside money specifically to get high-speed Internet into rural communities, not everywhere in America has it. They market themselves as being able to "provided lightning-fast Internet where you never thought possible" and nothing more. Sure, it's possible some people in the city may consider buying HughesNet for whatever reason, but it's highly unlikely, since there are far, far better choices in (at a guess) 80% of the country.

In short, they market to people desperate for high speed Internet -- people who know, without a doubt, they have nowhere else to turn to. "Fair" has nothing, nothing, to do with it.
--
ISP: HughesNet Satellite Internet
Modem Model: HN9000
Service Plan: Grandfathered ProPlus -- 425 MB + 100 MB/day, 1050 MB total, 1.6 Mbps DL; 250 Kbps UL)


One More Too

join:2010-09-09
Galena, IL
reply to septcasey

said by septcasey:

Hughesnet needs to look at the big picture. Wired and tower wireless internet is spread to new places everyday and people do not hesitate to drop their satellite ISP for that. If Hughesnet wants to stay in business in the near future, my suggestion is they should really start to make changes to keep their customers. The price is too high and the download allowance is too low. If you see the storm coming, prepare for it.

There is no question that that, when people get alternatives to satellite, they drop their Hughes connections, but, every year, the number people who are moving into areas not served by any other type of internet service provider is greater than the number of those who gain other options for the first time. And that is the reason why Hughes' customer base has grown steadily every year and why it will do the same into the foreseeable future.

It seems, Casey, like you need to go through this same dance a couple of times a year. You expect some business to provide you with the service that you think you deserve even if it means that they will lose money in doing so. And no amount of accurate information presented by those who do have a grasp of reality seems to make any difference.


septcasey

join:2006-09-07
United State

You guys could crunch numbers and make even torture look fair and reality. I'm just one of those people who don't believe in fair access policies. Forgive me for expressing my opinion.

My computer has no malware or viruses. How much data is Google Earth supposed to use with normal use. I guess by normal I mean opening the program, going to my state then going over it looking for certain places.



dbirdman
Premium,MVM
join:2003-07-07
usa
kudos:5

said by septcasey:

How much data is Google Earth supposed to use with normal use. I guess by normal I mean opening the program, going to my state then going over it looking for certain places.

Reasonable question. I just did a few things:

Opening GE: 100K
Selecting Cheyenne, WY, where I am at the moment took 2.8MB
Zooming to 28000 feet took 2.6MB
Zooming to 11600 feet took 3.8MB
Zooming out and moving a couple miles then back to 11600 feet took 7.1MB

So, 16.4MB to look at 2 places.
--
Motosat self-pointing dishes: 1.2-meter XF-3 on 93W, .74 meter G74 on 127W, SL-5 HD DirecTV|idirect 3100|Hughes HN7000S|Verizon UMW190 Air Card|1990 Blue Bird Wanderlodge Bus "Blue Thunder"|Author of hnFAP-Alert, PC-OPI and DSSatTool


septcasey

join:2006-09-07
United State

That seems a bit much but I guess Google's mentality is everyone has unlimited internet.



dbirdman
Premium,MVM
join:2003-07-07
usa
kudos:5

said by septcasey:

That seems a bit much but I guess Google's mentality is everyone has unlimited internet.

Somebody always has to be at blame, right? So it is Google's fault that they can't find a way to fit 20MB of data into 5MB of transmission.

When you use Google Earth you are loading huge numbers of individual photos, sewn together.

With photos there are only two ways you can go: More MB, or remove the detail. Personally I would prefer they leave the detail in. I can always choose how much I view.
--
Motosat self-pointing dishes: 1.2-meter XF-3 on 93W, .74 meter G74 on 127W, SL-5 HD DirecTV|idirect 3100|Hughes HN7000S|Verizon UMW190 Air Card|1990 Blue Bird Wanderlodge Bus "Blue Thunder"|Author of hnFAP-Alert, PC-OPI and DSSatTool
Expand your moderator at work


septcasey

join:2006-09-07
United State
reply to dbirdman

Re: Google Earth used up almost 400MB in 20 minutes.

We wouldn't have to play he blame game if businesses would get with the times. I know some people are happy with satellite internet, but most aren't. We are a settling people and we settle for what we can get in most situations. The download allowance isn't even my top concern with satellite internet, its the price. I can live with the FAP if the price for the internet matched the goods but it doesn't. It simply doesn't.



dbirdman
Premium,MVM
join:2003-07-07
usa
kudos:5

Businesses are never about "getting with the times." They are about making a profit. If you can convince a business that there is actually a profit in running high-speed internet at low monthly cost to your location they will jump on it faster than you can blink your eyes. Otherwise, not going to happen.

Government, on the other hand, routinely spends money where there is no reward to speak of. I'm currently visiting with a friend who was an engineer on stimulus-paid wastewater projects, and he relates how they spent $15M to build a treatment plant in a town with 49 residents.

So, you should probably be working on your congressional critters, not on the deaf ears of business.
--
Motosat self-pointing dishes: 1.2-meter XF-3 on 93W, .74 meter G74 on 127W, SL-5 HD DirecTV|idirect 3100|Hughes HN7000S|Verizon UMW190 Air Card|1990 Blue Bird Wanderlodge Bus "Blue Thunder"|Author of hnFAP-Alert, PC-OPI and DSSatTool

Expand your moderator at work

Elkhorn

join:2009-12-31
Lyons, OR

Re: Google Earth used up almost 400MB in 20 minutes.

I've used Google Earth for years, and been on HN since '07, and, I monitor my usage carefully - I've never seen GE consume anywhere near that bandwidth, I suspect your usage problem lies elsewhere.....
--
HN7000S 99 West 1250 MHZ Professional Pro Windows 7

Expand your moderator at work