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Charter8

join:2012-09-25

Fiber cable without a converter

Is there a fiber optic cable, patch cable, of any sorts I can use? If theres anything I can tweak on the software side, i'll look into it, but usually those applications aren't much help for me.

Right now im getting 50mbps down 4mbps up. Right now im running two ethernet cords to my router from the pc, both ports(onboard) bridged on a single system. From the router to the wall, just normal ethernet cable. ISP Epbfi 50mb. Other than bridging the two onboard ports, I changed the speed to 1gbps and duplex to full.

My usages are strict gaming. I've spent quite a bit of money modding this system to have it net lag. Seems like packet loss, or a stuttering effect.



LazMan
Premium
join:2003-03-26
canada

In a word? No.

Right now, you've got an electrical connection; fibre optics provide an optical pathway... They aren't interchangeable.

You may be picking up overhead from the teamed connection... A single gig-e is good for 20x your WAN speed... Depending on your router and NIC, the software and processing to parallel the two ports may actually introduce lag.


Charter8

join:2012-09-25

great reply. I never thought of bridging causing a packet loss, especially when your sending and receiving packets at a high rate/amount.

so using a single port, gig-e, on a 50mb connection is as fast as im gonna be able to send and receive right?

I'm surprised no one has custom created fiber optic cables with rj45 connectors yet.



LazMan
Premium
join:2003-03-26
canada
reply to Charter8

You're solving a problem you don't have by bridging the LAN ports; and it puts extra processing load on the NIC and router... If you needed greater then 1 gbps, or needed redundancy, that would be a different story.

As for the "RJ45" optical connection; doesn't exactly work like that; need optical tx/rx hardware; you'd either need a gbic of an sfp at both ends (NIC at the PC, the same at the router end.). Again, solving a problem you don't have... Optical is great for long distance; high bandwidth, or electrically noisy environments - none of these sound like they apply to you....



mackey
Premium
join:2007-08-20
kudos:12
reply to Charter8

said by Charter8:

Right now im running two ethernet cords to my router from the pc, both ports(onboard) bridged on a single system. From the router to the wall, just normal ethernet cable. ISP Epbfi 50mb. Other than bridging the two onboard ports, I changed the speed to 1gbps and duplex to full.

You're just making problems for yourself by doing that. Unless your internet connection is more then 1 gbit, having 2 cables does nothing but confuse the router and the computer. Also, when you said you "changed the speed to 1gbps and duplex to full" did you do it on BOTH the router and the computer? Forcing one side to full duplex but leaving the other on auto causes the side still trying to auto-negotiate to fail and assumes half-duplex. This causes a duplex mismatch with one side at half and the other at full, which causes lots of collisions and huge amounts of packet loss.

A fiber optic cable carries light. A "normal" ethernet cable carries electricity. You cannot convert between light and electrical signals without a special converter.

/M