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Blackbird
Built for Speed
Premium
join:2005-01-14
Fort Wayne, IN
kudos:3
Reviews:
·Frontier Communi..

2 edits
reply to Jan Janowski

Re: [WIN8] Windows 8 --- What benifits over W7-64?

It all reminds me of the "Detroit" syndrome. Companies make the bulk of their revenue by selling things, and when their products are relatively durable (in a longevity, usefulness sense), the most significant way to spur sales is the marketing of new "features" that differentiate the new product from the still-useful older products. Marketing focuses on convincing buyers that the new product posseses "must-have" features and a "trendy" appearance, as well as contains purported essential bells and whistles lacking in the old product. For a hundred years, automobiles have been sold this way - model year after model year. And, indeed at times, technological advances have eventually made older models "obsolete" in many ways, though a functional ancient car model will still get a driver to his destination sooner or later. What makes the old car 'obsolete' is very often only the evolution of driver expectations... and it's the job of a company's marketing department to increase those expectations each time a new version is developed. The more new versions successfully marketed, the more sales revenue - at least, until the point is reached where the market resists a new version because of the investment costs relative to buyers' economic conditions.

Some software developers issue new models of basic software mainly because their older designs, while still functional, are no longer compatible with growing numbers of current platforms or with essential emergent technology. Such companies' revenue growth comes primarily from developing new, innovative products for new arenas or finding significantly better ways for their existing products to perform their prior tasks. IMO, Microsoft (as well as many other "big boys" in the software/computer industry) makes their revenue by regularly marketing "new" versions every couple of years regardless of market demand, just as Detroit markets "new" car models each year. The marketing department is then tasked with developing all manner of tactics to somehow stimulate "demand" by convincing the prospective customers that the features added into the new version are "must-have" and "trendy".

When a new version genuinely reflects major technology shifts and presents powerful new features, it will be self-evident. When that is not the case, there will be all manner of puzzlement in the marketplace as many prospective customers ask themselves (and others) what possible genuine benefits the new product offers over the old. IMHO, this is exactly the latter situation... and Windows 8 is simply a product whose time-to-release has come up (in order to meet Microsoft's recurring revenue demands), rather than a product based on genuine, pre-existent market demand. While there's absolutely nothing 'wrong' in that, it's useful to keep it clearly in mind amidst the growing hype and spin.
--
"Is life so dear, or peace so sweet, as to be purchased at the price of chains and slavery? Forbid it, Almighty God!" -- P.Henry, 1775



Octavean
Premium,MVM
join:2001-03-31
New York, NY
kudos:1

I see your point.

However, I don’t necessarily agree with the sentiment, at least not completely anyway.

The upgrade cycle for Microsoft software in general may be arbitrary and the perceived value of the feature set of the upgrade(s) may vary. However, the cost of the product / product line often remains fairly static. A company that continually produces software may be perceived as improving incrementally, although, its not extraordinary if the product seems derivative at some point.

Microsoft could stagnate and likely would still make fairly good sales in OEM preinstalled systems (for a while). However, the competition such as Apple, Google and others wouldn’t stagnate and could increase market share during such a time. Which is not to say they wont gain in market share anyway.

Apple has presumably moved to an annual OS X upgrade cycle. That’s about three OS X full version upgrades for each Windows OS upgrade. Also look how well stagnation worked out for Microsoft in the tablet segment of the market.

The technology market is similar to a lot of species of sharks,….they better keep moving or they will die.


Glen T

join:2003-11-03
BC

One of the interesting aspects of this, is that outside of the group of what I would call "enthusiasts" the typical OS consumer will likely no longer be interested in upgrading their OS. Times have changed from the 90's when we were begging for a new OS. Today, upgrade sales must be minimal because of driver issues and because hardware is cheap to replace. People will get the new OS when they buy a new box.

The other interesting issue is that Bill G. when he was designing Vista (code named Longhorn or whatever) envisioned all kinds of innovations for the new platform that, one by one, were dropped as Vista development dragged on. The interesting part of this is that I don't think any of those innovations (such as a DB based file system) have ever seen the light of day in Win7 or now, Win8.

And Bill G. got put out to pasture as a result of his failure with Vista.



JohnInSJ
Premium
join:2003-09-22
San Jose, CA

said by Glen T:

And Bill G. got put out to pasture as a result of his failure with Vista.

Wow, that's an interesting take on history.
--
My place : »www.schettino.us


MSeng
Premium,Ex-Mod 2001-08
join:2000-07-13
Ork
kudos:6
reply to Glen T

said by Glen T:

And Bill G. got put out to pasture as a result of his failure with Vista.

That's not even close to accurate.
--
A)bort, R)etry, I)nfluence with large hammer.

Glen T

join:2003-11-03
BC

How long was Vista delayed? What was the list of features that was dropped from Vista? Wasn't this the only MS project that Bill personally oversaw, since he wrote BASIC?

Yeah, I know, he retired with full honors to oversee his foundation.

Maybe I overstated. After Vista flopped, Bill put himself out to pasture.



JohnInSJ
Premium
join:2003-09-22
San Jose, CA

said by Glen T:

How long was Vista delayed? What was the list of features that was dropped from Vista? Wasn't this the only MS project that Bill personally oversaw, since he wrote BASIC?

Yeah, I know, he retired with full honors to oversee his foundation.

Maybe I overstated. After Vista flopped, Bill put himself out to pasture.

Try again. Maybe use google. Or bing.
--
My place : »www.schettino.us

Glen T

join:2003-11-03
BC

I've got a million of them. Like MS ripping off IBM when they were supposed to be working on OS/2 by using the same team to develop NT.

Really, MS has not had an original idea since BASIC.



JohnInSJ
Premium
join:2003-09-22
San Jose, CA

Ok, good talk.


dave
Premium,MVM
join:2000-05-04
not in ohio
kudos:8
reply to Glen T

Could be the first time anyone's ever expressed sympathy for poor ickle IBM.


Glen T

join:2003-11-03
BC

said by dave:

Could be the first time anyone's ever expressed sympathy for poor ickle IBM.

Yeah, as an ISV, we went straight from DOS to OS/2. I've still got an "Official OS/2 Ambassador 1992" medal sitting on my desk. We bet on the wrong horse, but OS/2 was a superior OS that died an untimely death.