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IndyGamer

join:2012-09-26
reply to travelguy

Re: [Connectivity] New SB6120/6121 Firmware Released

Was going to get one of these modems today.

Should I get a zoom instead?

My old 5120 always been reliable but firmware never updated either as far as I know.


ExoticFish

join:2008-08-31
Stuarts Draft, VA

I'd go with the Zoom.


travelguy

join:1999-09-03
Santa Fe, NM

said by ExoticFish:

I'd go with the Zoom.

I would as well, if only because the Zoom is reported to have the ability to bond more uplink channels than the Motos do, if and when Comcast ever chooses to take advantage of that.

That said, it's not clear if the recent problem reports are due to the Moto firmware, changes on the CMTS side or some combination of things. There was a least one report that a Zoom buyer didn't see any change and ended returning the modem.

IndyGamer

join:2012-09-26

I seen the 8 channel vs 4 channels. Seems that would be more reliable if and when my neighbors leave uverse.

Thanks.



Wayne99021
Premium
join:2004-12-28
Mead, WA
kudos:1

Actually the Motorola SB 6140 is a 8 down 4 up modem just like the Zoom.
I have had that modem for about 6 weeks with no problems at all.



koitsu
Premium,MVM
join:2002-07-16
Mountain View, CA
kudos:23
reply to IndyGamer

The Zoom 5341J on Comcast (at least in my area) does bond to 8 downstream frequencies/channels. Comcast only offers 8 downstream frequencies (705/717/723/729/735/741/747/753MHz) in my area.

More bonded channels does not mean more reliability. I'm happy to refer you to an issue in my area which is affecting 747 and 753MHz caused by 4G/LTE cellular tower interference -- avoiding use of those frequencies is the only workaround at this time.

Now try to imagine what my experience would be like if I had a Zoom 5341J -- and here's evidence I've actually used one -- I'd be forced to use 747 and 753MHz, which would mean roughly 1/4 (technically 2/8) DOCSIS frames coming down the wire would result in the need for retransmission, which means delays + packet loss.

More bonded channels != more reliability. More bonded channels == more load distribution across multiple frequencies, vs. just banging on one single frequency, and eventually more bandwidth (not throughput/speed, but bandwidth). That's it. I feel sorry for anyone who uses the entire downstream spectrum in their area and has SNR issues on specific frequencies -- there's absolutely nothing the customer can do in the meantime but suffer.
--
Making life hard for others since 1977.
I speak for myself and not my employer/affiliates of my employer.



Wayne99021
Premium
join:2004-12-28
Mead, WA
kudos:1
reply to Wayne99021

Sorry, That should be 6141 not 6140.


n_w95482
Premium
join:2005-08-03
Ukiah, CA
reply to koitsu

I guess I've been lucky so far, my 6120 has been flawless with both 1.0.3.3 and 1.0.6.6. Hopefully 1.0.6.8 resolves the issues other people are having, I can imagine how frustrating it is .

said by koitsu:

More bonded channels does not mean more reliability. I'm happy to refer you to an issue in my area which is affecting 747 and 753MHz caused by 4G/LTE cellular tower interference -- avoiding use of those frequencies is the only workaround at this time.

Ah, very interesting discovery. I was tracking that thread earlier but hadn't read the last couple weeks of posts. That reminds me of an issue I had earlier this month while staying in Las Vegas for a week. My phone was on LTE most of the time (voice calls made it hand off to HSPA). Any time the phone was on LTE, it caused interference on certain TV channels (starting at 6 and roughly every 5-6 thereafter). Having the phone idle on the desk a few feet away caused occasional stuttering/tiling whenever it chirped at the tower, while doing a speedtest killed it completely. Even standing in the far corner of the bathroom (~18 ft, one wall) caused it to drop out.

The last night I was there, I ended up testing every single channel, writing down which ones were fine and which ones had issues, and reported it to the hotel service desk when I checked out. Hopefully they do something about it. I have no idea if the interference spread to adjacent rooms.

Verizon just turned on LTE service in my town, but our system here is on 549-597 MHz, so we should be spared of similar problems.
--
KI6RIT


JeffRoss

@comcast.net
reply to ExoticFish

Of course, you would say that wouldn't you.