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MIA_LEAK

@comcast.net
reply to Mr Matt

Re: Mystery Leak

Oh dear. I haven't considered this, and yes it is a zero lot line.

I guess I will ask my neighbor's permission.


Jtmo
Premium
join:2001-05-20
Novato, CA
reply to MIA_LEAK
Great builder, exhaust into the attic space (Lint and moisture). I wonder what "other" short cuts you will find over the years.


dcurrey
Premium
join:2004-06-29
reply to Mr Matt
Never heard of zero lot line before. Guess maybe that is why the ran the dryer vent that way. You would think running it to garage roof would be better. But then that pipe sticking out the front might be considered an eyesore.

Mr Matt

join:2008-01-29
Eustis, FL
kudos:1
Reviews:
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reply to MIA_LEAK
I would check you homeowners association documents for any restrictions regarding wall penetrations along the property line. In some cases that information is spelled out, when the association is responsible for painting the exterior of the homes. There is a possibility that when the adjacent homeowner attempts to sell their home the vent would be considered an encroachment. If you can vent the dryer though the garage wall I would be very concerned that the humidity from the bathroom vents will still collect in the attic and cause rot. I owned a house where the dryer and master bath exhaust fan shared a common vent. There was no problem because the vent penetrated the roof and all condensation was exhausted outside.

Option B is to insulate the dryer vent and have a competent tradesman install proper vent stack through the roof. You are going to have to do something about the condensation from the bathroom exhaust fans collecting in the attic.


MIA_LEAK

@comcast.net
I have engaged my neighbor and the president of the HOA regarding the possible encroachment. Thanks for the heads up.


MIA_LEAK

@comcast.net
reply to Mr Matt
I wonder, do electric dryers have to terminate outside? Why can't I simply exhaust it a couple feet into a recepticle?

Would this be a code violation?

I seriously do not want to exhaust it into my neighbor's lawn, even if they are ok with it...

Bob4
Account deleted

join:2012-07-22
New Jersey
reply to MIA_LEAK
said by MIA_LEAK :

The second one is the 1/2 bath ceiling fan exhaust.

It's tied into the dryer duct? That sounds like a condensation factory to me!

zippoboy7

join:2006-06-18
USA
reply to MIA_LEAK
You could also look at something like this for the dryer »www.amazon.com/Dundas-Jafine-TDI···00DZFTC6 or this »www.amazon.com/Ace-Dryer-Lint-Tr···00RLE5X0 if you cant vent it to the outside. Since the dryer is electric and in your garage you don't need to worry about CO discharge so the only thing that would come out is the humidity and chances are the garage is not air tight or insulated anyway so the humidity should not be a huge issue.


MIA_LEAK

@comcast.net
This looks like a great solution for me. Thanks!


Ken
Premium,MVM
join:2003-06-16
Markle, IN
reply to zippoboy7
said by zippoboy7:

You could also look at something like this for the dryer »www.amazon.com/Dundas-Jafine-TDI···00DZFTC6 or this »www.amazon.com/Ace-Dryer-Lint-Tr···00RLE5X0 if you cant vent it to the outside. Since the dryer is electric and in your garage you don't need to worry about CO discharge so the only thing that would come out is the humidity and chances are the garage is not air tight or insulated anyway so the humidity should not be a huge issue.

FYI those devices and any devices like them are illegal. Code specifically requires dryer vents to exhaust to the outside. It doesn't matter if they are gas or electric dryers, they must exhaust outside. The only exception is if the dryer is a ductless dryer (which I have never seen) which apparently comes from the factory without an exhaust pipe.

The code is IRC 1501.1 if anyone wants to look it up.


MIA_LEAK

@comcast.net
Ken - even if the dryer is in the garage? The area that its in is already humid...


MIA_LEAK

@comcast.net
reply to Ken
I think what Ill end up getting is the indoor lint kit as a temporary solution.

I still need to research if venting outside to my neighbor's yard is plausible.

Mr Matt

join:2008-01-29
Eustis, FL
kudos:1
Reviews:
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If you can get permission to vent through the garage wall, to suffer minimum heartburn, I would recommend placing a 90 degree elbow at the back of the dryer and then run the vent vertically as close to the ceiling as possible, then run the vent line horizontally to the through the wall vent. The higher you install the vent the less like you will be to have problems with someone screwing around with the vent. High enough so no one can reach it without a ladder. You might have to make the wall penetration a couple of inches below the ceiling if tie beams were poured at the top of the garage walls. You might be able to tell by looking in the garage attic.


sempergoofy
Premium
join:2001-07-06
Smyrna, GA
Reviews:
·AT&T Southeast
reply to MIA_LEAK
I think you will find that it really is temporary. I tried a similar device 20 years ago. You'll end up with dust/lint and moisture for mold/mildew to enjoy all over the space, wherever it is, if indoors. Currently that's your attic. Switching it to the garage is just moving the issue. You'll be much happier in the long run with a correctly implemented outdoor exhaust.

I wouldn't worry about exhausting toward your neighbor as long as it is outside where dirt/dust and moisture are there naturally.
--
nohup rm -fr /&


Ken
Premium,MVM
join:2003-06-16
Markle, IN
reply to MIA_LEAK
said by MIA_LEAK :

Ken - even if the dryer is in the garage? The area that its in is already humid...

Yes it's very specific it must be outside and the garage is not considered outside.


AVD
Respice, Adspice, Prospice
Premium
join:2003-02-06
Onion, NJ
kudos:1
reply to garys_2k
said by garys_2k:

Definitely open up that ceiling and take a look at what is really above it. I'm betting there's a leaky pipe there. You ought to replace the damaged drywall, anyway.

+++++1
--
--Standard disclaimers apply.--


AVD
Respice, Adspice, Prospice
Premium
join:2003-02-06
Onion, NJ
kudos:1
reply to Ken
said by Ken:

The code is IRC 1501.1 if anyone wants to look it up.

AFAIKT IRC 1502.1 is more specific (but what I looked at might be NJ specific.)
--
--Standard disclaimers apply.--


Ken
Premium,MVM
join:2003-06-16
Markle, IN
I have an old code book so maybe it's under 1502.1 now?


Corehhi

join:2002-01-28
Bluffton, SC

1 edit
reply to MIA_LEAK
said by MIA_LEAK :

The pipe does not go out through the roof. It exhausts into the attic.

AC guy went up there and found no evidence of a roof leak.

Bad don't vent into the attic. Moist hot air coming from the dryer will cause a problem. I don't see the problem venting towards a neighbors house unless there a HOA rule against it. Your houses aren't connected??? Right??? There should be plaenty of room for a vent. It's not like it vents a crazy amount of lint or heat.

My house is 12 years and I had to replace all my vent pipe boots, they were shot and water had been leaking down one of them. I wasn't clear if you have checked out the boots.


MIA_LEAK

@tracfone.com
Our homes are semi-detached.

The fact that the builders went out of their way to route the exhaust into the attic makes me paranoid about rerouting to the neighbors yard.

I need to research carefully the HOA and code implications in my area before I start drilling holes in the side of my garage.


ropeguru
Premium
join:2001-01-25
Mechanicsville, VA
Being that you are in Miami, I would certainly call the building inspector's office and ask what the code is for down there. Being that you are in hurricane territory and down there they are a PITA about it, you will want to do it right and get the proper permits if needed.

We sold a home in Miramar and they went so far as to make us get a permit and inspection for a window that was installed BEFORE we even bought the house.


norbert26
Premium
join:2010-08-10
Warwick, RI
reply to MIA_LEAK
said by MIA_LEAK :

Our homes are semi-detached.

The fact that the builders went out of their way to route the exhaust into the attic makes me paranoid about rerouting to the neighbors yard.

I need to research carefully the HOA and code implications in my area before I start drilling holes in the side of my garage.

The other homes must be set up the same way and have the venting in the attic. How are those homeowners handling this problem ? If other homeowners are experiencing this issue this should be able to be brought to the HOAs attention in a meeting.

Mr Matt

join:2008-01-29
Eustis, FL
kudos:1
Reviews:
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1 edit
reply to MIA_LEAK
You might want to go to the Fantech website, where the manufacture describes the booster fans they make:

»residential.fantech.net/resident···er-fans/

You can install one of these booster fans and use a soffit or fascia vent. You might want to call customer service at Fantech and determine if the pressure from one of the bathroom fans will activate the pressure switch and turn the booster fan on. With a booster fan you will not have to worry about back pressure affecting the performance of your dryer.


AVD
Respice, Adspice, Prospice
Premium
join:2003-02-06
Onion, NJ
kudos:1
reply to Ken
said by Ken:

I have an old code book so maybe it's under 1502.1 now?

1501 is generic
1502.1 is for dryer exhaust.
--
--Standard disclaimers apply.--

MaynardKrebs
Heave Steve, for the good of the country
Premium
join:2009-06-17
kudos:4
reply to Ken
said by Ken:

The only exception is if the dryer is a ductless dryer (which I have never seen) which apparently comes from the factory without an exhaust pipe.

Had one of these on the yacht. Actually it was a European designed combined washer/dryer. Worked pretty well.

You DON'T ever want to have to vent a dryer out the side on a yacht considering when we hardened the boat and pointed upwind we'd get the gunwale practically awash in a good wind.

MaynardKrebs
Heave Steve, for the good of the country
Premium
join:2009-06-17
kudos:4
reply to MIA_LEAK
said by MIA_LEAK :

I need to research carefully the HOA and code implications in my area before I start drilling holes in the side of my garage.

You need to do more than that.
The existing exhaust pipe routed up through the house also does not meet code.
Why?
Because it links the garage space with with interior of the home (even though where the vent pipe is run is behind drywall).
Now imagine a garage with a car idling and the dryer on - where do you think the carbon monoxide is going to go? It's going to get drawn into the dryer and then leak into the house through the unsealed ducting.

Without seeing an elevation drawing for the front/side of the house, can you run some approved-for-chimney-use B-vent vertically from the current - or a slightly different dryer location in the garage - to a point on the garage roof that's hidden from street view (ie. wouldn't run afoul of the HOA rules). Sorry I'm not looking at your floor plan drawing at the moment, so forgive me it it's evident that what I'm suggesting isn't possible.

What about coring the house wall 12" above the pavement beside the garage door frame and installing the dryer vent facing the street? Can you hide a vent behind a bush in that area?

Or if the house has a soffit at more or less the garage ceiling level, run the exhaust pipe up the inside garage wall, then over to the soffit, and then vent downwards through the soffit using a 'boot' and install a grill over the boot. All the while making sure that there is NO way for CO gas to leak into the house via your piping.

MaynardKrebs
Heave Steve, for the good of the country
Premium
join:2009-06-17
kudos:4
reply to MIA_Leak
Ok, looked at your drawing again.....

Common wall between you/neighbour is the kitchen/dining/garage side ... correct? And I see that you have a bedroom partially above the garage.

So sidewall vent to the 'left' is out.
Vertical vent is out unless there's some way to ensure that the house is completely sealed from garage - in my area that means spray foam in the garage ceiling and house wall above the ceiling exposed to the garage, all covered with 5/8" drywall, taped, and mudded - your code may vary.

Can you vent to the right over near your porch?

Best option is still venting to the front via the wall beside left garage door frame.

Best location for laundry appliances would have been beside the porch, and venting through the sidewall onto the porch area.