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88615298
Premium
join:2004-07-28
West Tenness
reply to silbaco

Re: What if you cover of your cap?

said by silbaco:

Or you can buy more: 500MB for $5; 1GB for $9; 2GB for $16.

So $32 for that watching that movie on Netflix. Hmmmmm I'd rather be throttled.

silbaco
Premium
join:2009-08-03
USA

1 recommendation

said by 88615298:

So $32 for that watching that movie on Netflix. Hmmmmm I'd rather be throttled.

It would be cheaper to buy a physical disc and have it shipped to your house.

iansltx

join:2007-02-19
Austin, TX
kudos:2
Reviews:
·Time Warner Cable
·Verizon Online DSL

1 recommendation

reply to 88615298
Last I checked, Netflix movies aren't 4GB in standard-def. Heck, HD maxes out at 4.5 Mbps or so, which means that a 100 minute movie would weigh in a bit less than 4GB in HD.

Also, think about it...there's a much better way to watch video delivered by satellite, from a bandwidth perspective: Dish or DirectTV. Even with spot beams, these birds have limited capacity.


PapaMidnight

join:2009-01-13
Baltimore, MD

1 recommendation

reply to silbaco
said by silbaco:

said by 88615298:

So $32 for that watching that movie on Netflix. Hmmmmm I'd rather be throttled.

It would be cheaper to buy a physical disc and have it shipped to your house.

Sad but true...


88615298
Premium
join:2004-07-28
West Tenness
reply to iansltx
said by iansltx:

Last I checked, Netflix movies aren't 4GB in standard-def.

Who wants to watch SD movies on a HDTV? Netflix SD is like watching VHS.

Heck, HD maxes out at 4.5 Mbps or so, which means that a 100 minute movie would weigh in a bit less than 4GB in HD.

A) It's been stated that's it's 4800 kbps but Netflix also states that HD uses 2.3 GB an hour. So 4800 kbps= 2 GB an hour. So it's between 2- 2.3 GB an hour according to Netflix itself.

B) Some movies are 100 minutes some are 2 hours or more which is 120 minutes.

Also, think about it...there's a much better way to watch video delivered by satellite, from a bandwidth perspective: Dish or DirectTV. Even with spot beams, these birds have limited capacity.

maybe someone is a cord cutter and doesn't want to pay the outrageous fees pay TV charges with mostly crappy content and infomercials.

iansltx

join:2007-02-19
Austin, TX
kudos:2
Reviews:
·Time Warner Cable
·Verizon Online DSL
Then it's their problem that they picked a place where satellite broadband is the only thing they can get.

DBS is an efficient way to deliver video to widely dispersed users. Unicast satellite Internet...not so much...considering that it would only take 25,000 customers or so streaming HD video to max out the entire HughesNet satellite...the brand new one.


88615298
Premium
join:2004-07-28
West Tenness
said by iansltx:

Then it's their problem that they picked a place where satellite broadband is the only thing they can get.

Yes someone buying a house before the internet was around should have predicted the future.