dslreports logo
site
 
    All Forums Hot Topics Gallery
spc

spacer




how-to block ads


Search Topic:
uniqs
1564
share rss forum feed


PSWired

join:2006-03-26
Annapolis, MD

1 recommendation

reply to John Galt

Re: OT - Site Monitoring Device - Input Needed

Let's not forget about PacketFlux:

»www.packetflux.com/



John Galt
Forward, March
Premium
join:2004-09-30
Happy Camp
kudos:6
reply to CMack

said by CMack:

here is one sold in Canada John, we have used them before »www.remotemonitoringsystems.ca/r···ndex.php

Yep...this is what we use as a model for "our competition".

Even the RMS-100 is $595USD...ouch.

bburley

join:2010-04-30
Cold Lake, AB
reply to John Galt

said by John Galt:

said by Chele:

Make it able to handle up to 36v so that it can be connected directly to solar power systems.

Units will accept up to 48V at either the power connector or POE.

48V is not enough for 48V Solar systems. Our 48V battery bank can reach 64V during peak charging. I blew up two $700 boards that were rated at 70V due to the "stiff" supply voltage at the instant of turn-on. Finally had to install a 24V DC-DC Converter and run from that. Funny that the converter was also rated at 70V input but it survives. It was cheaper than blowing up another board.


TomS_
Git-r-done
Premium,MVM
join:2002-07-19
London, UK
kudos:5
reply to John Galt

Make it rack mountable too.

I have used a device from these guys before: »www.roomalert.com/

Worked pretty well. Two temperature sensors and a couple of analogue/digital inputs to measure temperatures, voltages, and doors.

IIRC its modular, you just buy the type of module you need to measure voltage/temp/whatever and plug it in to a socket on the device. It recognises it and produces stats accordingly.

Can do SNMP, but we didnt use traps so unsure about that.

For the most part, our door, voltage, and temperature sensors all lived in our Eaton/Powerware rectifier units.


prairiesky

join:2008-12-08
canada
kudos:2
reply to John Galt

Actually, a great idea that I liked, It may have been on that room alert, was a light output.

So there was a light stack on top with a green, yellow and red, depending on the state, it would be light up accordingly. Great if your tower is in a yard and someone is keeping an eye on it.


gunther_01
Premium
join:2004-03-29
Saybrook, IL
reply to John Galt

Do not make it rack mountable. Make provisions to make it rack mountable. As small as humanly possible is ideal. If I can't fit it in the box I already have, it just adds to the cost of the unit for me to add another box to put it in.
--
»www.wirelessdatanet.net



John Galt
Forward, March
Premium
join:2004-09-30
Happy Camp
kudos:6
reply to bburley

said by bburley:

said by John Galt:

said by Chele:

Make it able to handle up to 36v so that it can be connected directly to solar power systems.

Units will accept up to 48V at either the power connector or POE.

48V is not enough for 48V Solar systems. Our 48V battery bank can reach 64V during peak charging. I blew up two $700 boards that were rated at 70V due to the "stiff" supply voltage at the instant of turn-on. Finally had to install a 24V DC-DC Converter and run from that. Funny that the converter was also rated at 70V input but it survives. It was cheaper than blowing up another board.

Talking with the interface engineer...he says that it can accept line voltage, properly protected (fused and current-limited).

Our objective is to limit the on-board working voltages to 50 volts or less, as this is the breakpoint for Class 2 devices. The requirements are far less stringent in many applications.

A voltage divider prior to the input is easy to do...more than happy to sell you one for $99.
--
The most powerful weapon in the world is ignorance. Politicians exploit it to achieve almost anything they want.


bburley

join:2010-04-30
Cold Lake, AB

A voltage divider is usually just two resistors which is only suited for steady current loads, unless you meant something else.

The DC-DC Converter worked out well. Everything but the touchy board was running on 48V. Having 24V available allowed me to add a MikroTik Router later on.

The touchy board had an on-board regulator which allowed it to work with an input voltage as low as 15V or so. It was the regulator that kept exploding at turn-on.


Chele

join:2003-07-23
kudos:1
reply to John Galt

John

What is your best guess for ETA on these products?



John Galt
Forward, March
Premium
join:2004-09-30
Happy Camp
kudos:6

1 edit

said by Chele:

John

What is your best guess for ETA on these products?

It's in the engineering phase (hence all the questions) so "not tomorrow" is probably a good answer.

But soon...!
--
The most powerful weapon in the world is ignorance. Politicians exploit it to achieve almost anything they want.