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NetFixer
Snarl For The Camera Please
Premium
join:2004-06-24
The Boro
Reviews:
·Cingular Wireless
·Comcast Business..
·Vonage

3 edits

[Business] C'mon Comcast, how hard is it to change a PTR record?

It has been a month since I turned in my 75.146.8.40/29 IP address block to Comcast, and 3 weeks since I officially asked for my domain name to be removed from that IP address block that I no longer use (because it was obvious after a week that it wasn't going to be done automatically). And yet, what do still I see?



C:\>nslookup 75.146.8.40 75.75.75.75
Server:  cdns01.comcast.net
Address:  75.75.75.75
 
Name:    75-146-8-40-Nashville.hfc.comcastbusiness.net
Address:  75.146.8.40
 
C:\>nslookup 75.146.8.41 75.75.75.75
Server:  cdns01.comcast.net
Address:  75.75.75.75
 
Name:    host1.dcs-net.net
Address:  75.146.8.41
 
C:\>nslookup 75.146.8.42 75.75.75.75
Server:  cdns01.comcast.net
Address:  75.75.75.75
 
Name:    host2.dcs-net.net
Address:  75.146.8.42
 
C:\>nslookup 75.146.8.43 75.75.75.75
Server:  cdns01.comcast.net
Address:  75.75.75.75
 
Name:    host3.dcs-net.net
Address:  75.146.8.43
 
C:\>nslookup 75.146.8.44 75.75.75.75
Server:  cdns01.comcast.net
Address:  75.75.75.75
 
Name:    host4.dcs-net.net
Address:  75.146.8.44
 
C:\>nslookup 75.146.8.45 75.75.75.75
Server:  cdns01.comcast.net
Address:  75.75.75.75
 
Name:    host5.dcs-net.net
Address:  75.146.8.45
 
C:\>nslookup 75.146.8.46 75.75.75.75
Server:  cdns01.comcast.net
Address:  75.75.75.75
 
Name:    host6.dcs-net.net
Address:  75.146.8.46
 
C:\>nslookup 75.146.8.47 75.75.75.75
Server:  cdns01.comcast.net
Address:  75.75.75.75
 
Name:    75-146-8-47-Nashville.hfc.comcastbusiness.net
Address:  75.146.8.47
 
 



To make this matter even more ridiculous, it is pretty obvious that Comcast has already assigned that former 75.146.8.40/29 block into 75.146.8.40/30 and 75.146.8.44/30 IP address blocks that are already in use by other customers (as is illustrated by the ping responses shown below).



C:\>ping 75.146.8.40
 
Pinging 75.146.8.40 with 32 bytes of data:
 
Request timed out.
Request timed out.
Request timed out.
Request timed out.
 
Ping statistics for 75.146.8.40:
    Packets: Sent = 4, Received = 0, Lost = 4 (100% loss),
 
C:\>ping 75.146.8.41
 
Pinging 75.146.8.41 with 32 bytes of data:
 
Reply from 75.146.8.41: bytes=32 time=1153ms TTL=249
Reply from 75.146.8.41: bytes=32 time=1129ms TTL=249
Reply from 75.146.8.41: bytes=32 time=1124ms TTL=249
Reply from 75.146.8.41: bytes=32 time=1121ms TTL=249
 
Ping statistics for 75.146.8.41:
    Packets: Sent = 4, Received = 4, Lost = 0 (0% loss),
Approximate round trip times in milli-seconds:
    Minimum = 1121ms, Maximum = 1153ms, Average = 1131ms
 
C:\>ping 75.146.8.42
 
Pinging 75.146.8.42 with 32 bytes of data:
 
Reply from 75.146.8.42: bytes=32 time=1096ms TTL=59
Reply from 75.146.8.42: bytes=32 time=1106ms TTL=59
Reply from 75.146.8.42: bytes=32 time=1092ms TTL=59
Reply from 75.146.8.42: bytes=32 time=1116ms TTL=59
 
Ping statistics for 75.146.8.42:
    Packets: Sent = 4, Received = 4, Lost = 0 (0% loss),
Approximate round trip times in milli-seconds:
    Minimum = 1092ms, Maximum = 1116ms, Average = 1102ms
 
C:\>ping 75.146.8.43
 
Pinging 75.146.8.43 with 32 bytes of data:
 
Request timed out.
Request timed out.
Request timed out.
Request timed out.
 
Ping statistics for 75.146.8.43:
    Packets: Sent = 4, Received = 0, Lost = 4 (100% loss),
 
C:\>ping 75.146.8.44
 
Pinging 75.146.8.44 with 32 bytes of data:
 
Request timed out.
Request timed out.
Request timed out.
Request timed out.
 
Ping statistics for 75.146.8.44:
    Packets: Sent = 4, Received = 0, Lost = 4 (100% loss),
 
C:\>ping 75.146.8.45
 
Pinging 75.146.8.45 with 32 bytes of data:
 
Reply from 75.146.8.45: bytes=32 time=23ms TTL=58
Reply from 75.146.8.45: bytes=32 time=52ms TTL=58
Reply from 75.146.8.45: bytes=32 time=20ms TTL=58
Reply from 75.146.8.45: bytes=32 time=22ms TTL=58
 
Ping statistics for 75.146.8.45:
    Packets: Sent = 4, Received = 4, Lost = 0 (0% loss),
Approximate round trip times in milli-seconds:
    Minimum = 20ms, Maximum = 52ms, Average = 29ms
 
C:\>ping 75.146.8.46
 
Pinging 75.146.8.46 with 32 bytes of data:
 
Reply from 75.146.8.46: bytes=32 time=21ms TTL=59
Reply from 75.146.8.46: bytes=32 time=18ms TTL=59
Reply from 75.146.8.46: bytes=32 time=20ms TTL=59
Reply from 75.146.8.46: bytes=32 time=20ms TTL=59
 
Ping statistics for 75.146.8.46:
    Packets: Sent = 4, Received = 4, Lost = 0 (0% loss),
Approximate round trip times in milli-seconds:
    Minimum = 18ms, Maximum = 21ms, Average = 19ms
 
C:\>ping 75.146.8.47
 
Pinging 75.146.8.47 with 32 bytes of data:
 
Request timed out.
Request timed out.
Request timed out.
Request timed out.
 
Ping statistics for 75.146.8.47:
    Packets: Sent = 4, Received = 0, Lost = 4 (100% loss),
 
 



I don't have any idea what the current users of those IP addresses are doing with their connection, and I really don't care. What I do care about is that whatever is being done, there is the implication that I am doing it because the PTR records point back to one of my domains. And so far the only response I have gotten from Comcast to my request to have the PTR records changed to either point back to the default 75-146-8-4x-Nashville.hfc.comcastbusiness.net values, or point to the new users, is a not so veiled threat from a Comcast legal beagle that I should not be trying to use static IP addresses if I am not paying for them.

EDIT: I almost forgot to mention that one other thing was done as a result of my request to revert the PTR entries to their default values. Within a day of being called by the Comcast legal beagle, my SMCD3G-CCR was remotely issued a factory default reset which took it out of bridge mode. The first BC CSR I spoke to after it happened said that it had been done deliberately (following Comcast management orders) to keep me from trying to illegally use static IP addresses without paying for them, and he refused to help me any further. Now perhaps what that CSR told me was BS because he did not want to admit that he did not know how to put an SMCD3G-CCR into bridge mode, but that was what I was told (and I have never been a big believer in random coincidence).

Fortunately the BC CSR that I spoke to when I called back was more understanding, competent, and cooperative. Of course, my next step was to purchase and install an SB6121 modem, so that any future such retaliation would have minimal effect on my network. FWIW, I purchased the modem because Comcast also refused to let me lease an SB612x modem (I tried to arrange such a swap twice...once at the local Comcast office, and again by contacting Comcast support to try to setup a UPS or FedEx swap).
--
We can never have enough of nature.
We need to witness our own limits transgressed, and some life pasturing freely where we never wander.

ExoticFish

join:2008-08-31
Stuarts Draft, VA

Re: [Business] C'mon Comcast, how hard is it to change a PTR rec

So if I'm reading this correctly, you were using an IP block for your domain on a residential account. Somehow using static IPs without paying for them ?
--
»www.VAJeeps.com



JohnInSJ
Premium
join:2003-09-22
Aptos, CA

said by ExoticFish:

So if I'm reading this correctly, you were using an IP block for your domain on a residential account. Somehow using static IPs without paying for them ?

No, he had a static IP block which he requested comcast set up reverse-dns entries to point to his domain names.

to other business class users with static IP addresses: the order of operations is

1) request reset of PTR records
1a) wait for conformation...
2) cancel static IPs
--
My place : »www.schettino.us


JohnInSJ
Premium
join:2003-09-22
Aptos, CA
reply to NetFixer

said by NetFixer:

It has been a month since I turned in my 75.146.8.40/29 IP address block to Comcast,

looks reset to me
 nslookup 75.146.8.40
Server:10.0.0.1
Address:10.0.0.1#53
 
Non-authoritative answer:
40.8.146.75.in-addr.arpaname = 75-146-8-40-Nashville.hfc.comcastbusiness.net.
 
Authoritative answers can be found from:
in-addr.arpanameserver = d.in-addr-servers.arpa.
in-addr.arpanameserver = b.in-addr-servers.arpa.
in-addr.arpanameserver = f.in-addr-servers.arpa.
in-addr.arpanameserver = e.in-addr-servers.arpa.
in-addr.arpanameserver = a.in-addr-servers.arpa.
in-addr.arpanameserver = c.in-addr-servers.arpa.
 
--
My place : »www.schettino.us


cxg347

join:2009-10-08
Philadelphia, PA
reply to NetFixer

Thank you for pointing this out. We investigated the issue and it should be taken care of now.

Thanks,
Chris



NetFixer
Snarl For The Camera Please
Premium
join:2004-06-24
The Boro
Reviews:
·Cingular Wireless
·Comcast Business..
·Vonage

said by cxg347:

Thank you for pointing this out. We investigated the issue and it should be taken care of now.

Thanks,
Chris

Yes, it is now fixed. Thank you very much.
--
We can never have enough of nature.
We need to witness our own limits transgressed, and some life pasturing freely where we never wander.


NetFixer
Snarl For The Camera Please
Premium
join:2004-06-24
The Boro
Reviews:
·Cingular Wireless
·Comcast Business..
·Vonage

2 edits
reply to ExoticFish

said by ExoticFish:

So if I'm reading this correctly, you were using an IP block for your domain on a residential account. Somehow using static IPs without paying for them ?

No, I have a business class account, and I used to have a static IP address block, but I converted my account to use dynamic IP addresses instead. I did that because my VPN usage changed, and the only thing I was doing that really needed a static IP address was a directly hosted email server. The email server was easily reconfigured to use a Comcast SMTP server as a smart host, and its MX records changed to use Comcast's MX servers (which temporarily use Comcast's email servers to store incoming email which can then be polled and downloaded by my local email server). A side benefit of using Comcast's email servers as an intermediary is that I can use their bandwidth and server capacity for spam and malware filtering before my local server even sees it.

Another side benefit of using a bridged modem with Comcast Business Class service is that I now have native dual stack IPv4/IPv6. This is something that was not possible with the SMCD3G-CCR operating in gateway mode (using either static IP addresses or a DHCP supplied dynamic IP address).

However, what you claim to assume is apparently what someone in Comcast's legal department also thought I was somehow magically (hint: it doesn't work that way) and illegally doing. Apparently my request to have the PTR records changed from pointing to my domain and point back to a Comcast domain instead went directly to Comcast's legal department (to someone who had no idea what a PTR record was, but assumed it was something bad anyway), and nobody in Comcast's engineering department even saw the request.
--
We can never have enough of nature.
We need to witness our own limits transgressed, and some life pasturing freely where we never wander.


NetFixer
Snarl For The Camera Please
Premium
join:2004-06-24
The Boro
Reviews:
·Cingular Wireless
·Comcast Business..
·Vonage

2 edits
reply to JohnInSJ

said by JohnInSJ:

said by NetFixer:

It has been a month since I turned in my 75.146.8.40/29 IP address block to Comcast,

looks reset to me
 nslookup 75.146.8.40
Server:10.0.0.1
Address:10.0.0.1#53
 
Non-authoritative answer:
40.8.146.75.in-addr.arpaname = 75-146-8-40-Nashville.hfc.comcastbusiness.net.
 
Authoritative answers can be found from:
in-addr.arpanameserver = d.in-addr-servers.arpa.
in-addr.arpanameserver = b.in-addr-servers.arpa.
in-addr.arpanameserver = f.in-addr-servers.arpa.
in-addr.arpanameserver = e.in-addr-servers.arpa.
in-addr.arpanameserver = a.in-addr-servers.arpa.
in-addr.arpanameserver = c.in-addr-servers.arpa.
 

Yes, the PTR records were corrected after this thread went public. It's amazing how that works sometimes, isn't it?

OTOH, the IP address 75.146.8.40 that you used as an example (the network address), and the IP address 75.146.8.47 (the broadcast address) were not setup to point to my domain in the first place; I only had the real payload IP address PTR records point to my domain (as I showed in my original post).

--
We can never have enough of nature.
We need to witness our own limits transgressed, and some life pasturing freely where we never wander.


JohnInSJ
Premium
join:2003-09-22
Aptos, CA

Yep correct - I had run the same range as your post, noticed they were all pointing to the correct location, and cut and paste the first one. But they were all reset at the time of my post
--
My place : »www.schettino.us