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AlanR917

@charter.com

Good certifications for Cyber Crime division of the FBI?

Hello everyone. I was wondering what are some good certifications/online courses to take in the field of computer security if I want to work for the Cyber Crimes division of the FBI? I plan on applying at MIT for computer science with a focus on computer security. Thank you



Name Game
Premium
join:2002-07-07
Grand Rapids, MI
kudos:7

1 edit

Hi Alan. Glad you stopped by. I will IM a few members that I know will steer you in the right direction. Best of Luck to you wiz. Great audio app.

Regards, John

Be patient..some times people who are not signed up as members get their posts held for review before they can be viewed.

Expand your moderator at work


AlanR917

@charter.com
reply to Name Game

Re: Good certifications for Cyber Crime division of the FBI?

Hey John, thank you for the reply. Are you referring to the Woodson Art Museum app I created? How did you know about that and how did you know it was me? Thanks again


AlanR917

join:2012-10-04
united state
reply to Name Game

I was using an anonymous screen name before, you should be able to IM me now, thank you. And how did you know I made an audio app?



EGeezer
zichrona livracha
Premium
join:2002-08-04
Midwest
kudos:8
Reviews:
·Callcentric

1 edit
reply to AlanR917

I know of people in that position - the SA in charge of our area cybercrime unit has several GIAC gold certifications. Last count they had several contract personnel with SANS certifications in coding, networking, security and forensics. Criminal justice and cyber law would be a plus.

Forensics, Intrusion analysis, security and Incident handling are IT fields to concentrate on. EnCase seems to be the prevalent forensics suite in law enforcement, so experience and/or certification in that would be beneficial.

You will still have to pass the fitness test. See
»www.fbijobs.gov/1113.asp

I'll see if I can get more information. If you register here at broadbandreports, you can IM me - and vice versa.

Anybody that does sockets programming is at least one up on me.....



Name Game
Premium
join:2002-07-07
Grand Rapids, MI
kudos:7
reply to AlanR917

said by AlanR917:

I was using an anonymous screen name before, you should be able to IM me now, thank you. And how did you know I made an audio app?

IM sent and others will help..have a nice evening.


Krisnatharok
Caveat Emptor
Premium
join:2009-02-11
Earth Orbit
kudos:12
reply to AlanR917

said by AlanR917:

And how did you know I made an audio app?

For someone who wants to go into cyber investigations, you have a lot to learn.

You seem to have a very extensive internet presence all tied to one username. Are you really registered on Multi-Player Game Hacking?
--
If we lose this freedom of ours, history will record with the greatest astonishment, those who had the most to lose, did the least to prevent its happening.


Ellexa

join:2010-11-08

1 recommendation

reply to AlanR917

1) Classes - Classes are great for giving a foundation. Definitely get the basics (hardware, networks, programming . . . which it looks like you may already have). And definitely take some security courses just so that you understand the mentality, culture, and scope of the business. Remember that there are two different sides of Security. One is technical, and the other is more administrative. Take classes in both so that you can understand both sides of the business.

2) Certifications - Look into the CEH, CCE, and CISSP. The FBI *loves* that kind of stuff on your resume. Also, I wouldn't be surprised if those certs are a requirement to even apply for the job. If you don't have the right certs, and can't check those boxes when you apply for the job, you won't even be considered, regardless of what other background you may have.

You can get all these certs by studying on your own, but depending upon your experience, it may be easier to just take a boot camp class and get it out of the way. However, those boot camp classes are majorly expensive. Once you have those certs, you could even apply for an internship with the FBI even before you have your degree.

Something else to remember as you work towards this goal - make sure your background is spic and span. Your credit, what your friends and professors know about you, any criminal background, and what you say online will be scrutinized. If you want to work for the FBI, start preparing yourself now.

. . . . just my two cents.



AlanR

@charter.com
reply to Krisnatharok

said by Krisnatharok:

For someone who wants to go into cyber investigations, you have a lot to learn.

Ohhh, I guess I didnt think that through very well, did I? :P


Krisnatharok
Caveat Emptor
Premium
join:2009-02-11
Earth Orbit
kudos:12

I sure hope that "Alan R." is not your real name.


HELLFIRE
Premium
join:2009-11-25
kudos:18
reply to AlanR917

CISSP is a recognized one, I forgot about CEH. I should warn looking at the requirements of CISSP is DEFINATELY
not for the faint of heart. Ripped from Wikipedia :

Possess a minimum of five years of direct full-time security work experience in two or more of the ten (ISC)² information security domains (CBK). One year may be waived for having either a four-year college degree, a Master's degree in Information Security, or for possessing one of a number of other certifications from other organizations.[9] A candidate not possessing the necessary five years of experience may earn the Associate of (ISC)² designation by passing the required CISSP examination. The Associate of (ISC)² for CISSP designation is valid for a maximum of six years from the date (ISC)² notifies the candidate of having passed the exam. During those six years a candidate will need to obtain the required experience and submit the required endorsement form for certification as a CISSP. Upon completion of the professional experience requirements the certification will be converted to CISSP status.[10]

Attest to the truth of their assertions regarding professional experience and accept the CISSP Code of Ethics.[11]

Answer four questions regarding criminal history and related background.[12]

Pass the CISSP exam with a scaled score of 700 points or greater out of 1000 possible points. The exam is multiple choice, consisting of 250 questions with four options each, to be answered over a period of six hours. 25 of the questions are experimental questions which are not graded.[12]

Have their qualifications endorsed by another CISSP in good standing. The endorser attests that the candidate's assertions regarding professional experience are true to the best of their knowledge, and that the candidate is in good standing within the information security industry.[13]

Best of luck, regardless.

Regards
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