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Jack_in_VA
Premium
join:2007-11-26
North, VA
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Millenicom
reply to alkizmo

Re: New Build structured wiring

said by alkizmo:

Wired for key spots (living room, den, whatever other room that isn't just a bedroom/toilet/kitchen).

Wireless to cover the randomly located networked device.

Don't forget that some people might want a "Big flat Screen" Home theater, telephone and wired computer in bathroom, basement and garage.

mr_boodog

join:2008-08-12
55824
reply to malletto
Perhaps all of your systems are not yet capable, but would fiber also be something to consider?

Even if your network is not ready, I think the cost would be minimal to future proof the house. Even the type of fiber ready tubing that can be blown in down the line. »www.emtelle.us/?id=119


garys_2k
Premium
join:2004-05-07
Farmington, MI
Reviews:
·Callcentric
reply to malletto
I used to be in the "wires everywhere, each wall in every room sould get two drops of two CAT wires, each, plus RG6" camp. Now, not so much.

In my new house I will bring network wiring to the den (likely 4-5 CAT drops + 2 RG6), the great room TV area (1 or 2 CAT drops + 2 RG6)) and one each CAT and RG6 to each bedroom. One CAT drop in the kitchen for a hard-wired phone and an RG6 there, too, for the under-cabinet TV. Otherwise it'll be wireless.

Most "computing" in the house is done via phone, tablet or laptop. The one printer uses a CAT drop now but can work over wireless. But only the points where a lot of data will need to be transferred will get hard wired drops, the rest can live with WiFi.

Liberty

join:2005-06-12
Tucson, AZ
Reviews:
·Cox HSI
reply to malletto
An important detail only one poster barely touched on so far.

There are multi grades of coax out there.
As an absolute minimum, use solid copper (not copper plated steel) conductor, 3 gig swept coax.
Minimum of one pair per station.

Quad shield if you want but solid copper, 3 gig swept quad can be a challenge to locate.


AVD
Respice, Adspice, Prospice
Premium
join:2003-02-06
Onion, NJ
kudos:1
reply to malletto
All I need is a cell phone


drew
Radiant
Premium
join:2002-07-10
Port Orchard, WA
kudos:6
reply to malletto
I put 8 RJ-45 jacks in my house about three (four?) years ago. Old construction (mid 60s) and it was just me and my brother-in-law.

Lessons learned:
•Never underestimate the need to re-run cabling in the future.
•I use two of the 7 jacks on a daily basis: 1) my main PC, 2) my media HTPC.

The only place I ran two jacks to a single faceplate was the master bedroom where the wife and I had our PCs set up at the time. Right now, I would very much like to have another two or three jacks available by the TV. One for the BD player, another for the eventual console I'll end up procuring during the next gen.

I should not show you a picture of where it all comes together. It was a "my budget didn't include patch panels, nor a rack, so this will be a couple month solution until it's done right." Guess what? It's still like that not because we can't afford to update it, but because it works just fine as is.

I would like to echo the sentiment about conduit - I'd kill for conduit in my house. I would also like to say that running wiring for key locations in the attic or basement to support WAPs is a must-have. I am sure that one day we'll have a video monitor (be it a TV or another display type) in locations unexpected (bathroom?) and not having to think about how I was going to get a strong signal out there would be nice.
--
flickr | 'Cause I've been waiting, all my life just waiting
For you to shine, shine your light on me

malletto

join:2009-01-03
Purcellville, VA
reply to malletto
I really liked the idea of conduit by the tv to run potential hdmi or whatever else I need whenever I mount the tv later. Adding that to the list of stuff to ask the installer if they can do. In our previous house we had 2 cat5e and 2 rg6 going to our tv area. I had a switch there to give myself the necessary jacks for all the home theater stuff. Everything is wireless except for the connection of the NAS, boxee box, xbox360, tv and bluray. The location of the rg6 is probably more important, never know where we will want to put a new tv in a bedroom or kitchen. The basement is not going to be finished right away so I can run cable there whenever we get around to doing it since the wiring cabinet will be in the basement.


alkizmo

join:2007-06-25
Pierrefonds, QC
kudos:1
reply to drew
said by drew:

I would very much like to have another two or three jacks available by the TV.

A gigabit switch would do nicely, and they cost very little.
Now don't go slamming the idea of sharing multiple devices on a switch over a single line. We're talking about 1gbs speed here.


drew
Radiant
Premium
join:2002-07-10
Port Orchard, WA
kudos:6
That's certainly an option, and, interestingly enough, the TV area is the *easiest* area to run new cable to. The only thing separating the TV area and the termination point is a single wall and about 12' of lateral movement.
--
flickr | 'Cause I've been waiting, all my life just waiting
For you to shine, shine your light on me


fourout

@tmodns.net
reply to malletto
as mentioned, u will more impotantly nowadays need double the ac outletsmost everywhere. costs maybe $10 more per outlets location. but much safer than running extension cords or outlet strips or multioutlet adapters. think of all the places in your home now where u have six devices running out of a dual outlet...


cableties
Premium
join:2005-01-27
reply to malletto
If I may add, pull an extra fishtape with your bundle.
Trust me, if ever a pair is bad or need to add some new wire, that tape is a lifesaver.
--
Splat


alkizmo

join:2007-06-25
Pierrefonds, QC
kudos:1
said by fourout :

think of all the places in your home now where u have six devices running out of a dual outlet...

With at least one receptacle per 6 feet, you're covered to have plenty of places to plug in things. When I was wiring my basement, I was shocked by how many receptacles I had to wire because of the 6 foot.

As for the 6 devices on one outlet, that's no big deal, if you need more plugs, buy one of those surge protectors that screw over the receptacle.

I bet you're talking about something like the TV with the Wii + bluray + HTPC , etc etc. Those combined won't use more than 5A, I know because I have a UPS that reports the wattage, on it I have:

- 55" LED TV
- Wii
- Desktop
- Desktop monitor
- VoIP box
- Wireless phone
- IPTV device
- Wireless headphones
- Two lights

All of them active use no more than 600W.

You just need to make sure that you're not overloading that circuit at other receptacles.

said by cableties:

If I may add, pull an extra fishtape with your bundle.
Trust me, if ever a pair is bad or need to add some new wire, that tape is a lifesaver.

If your wire went bad, you can use it to pull new wire.
If you can't do that because it broke off, then you shouldn't pull new wiring through the same path, because whatever broke the original wire can still break the new one.

How does network cable go bad anyway aside from physical damage? If it's only physical damage, then take preventive measures to avoid it ever happening (like conduit).
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