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Shaw50

@shawcable.net

Potential Issues With Temp. Coax Run?

Hey Guys,

Long story short our business is currently being fed with a temporary line due to construction outside mine or Shaw's control.

The line is run along the construction site on the pavement beside their orange fencing. This then runs up over a lawn, in parts of a gutter, up and over a few lamp standards, into our tree and down to the pedestal at the base of the tree. Was supposed to be a temp. fix but it appears the city is taking their time with easements, cost etc.

Our concern is this cable has been cut/crushed a hand full of times all ready from the construction people/machines. With winter approaching what will the elements do to this cable that is on the ground for 65% of the run? (All ready has two splices on the ground)


kevinds
Premium
join:2003-05-01
Calgary, AB
kudos:3

Tempature isn't an issue,

Water getting into the coax cable can be a concern - because the cable is copper.

Once it freezes, it isn't an issue except people breaking/cutting it.
--
Yes, I am not employed and looking for IT work. Have passport, will travel.


tlhIngan

join:2002-07-08
Richmond, BC
kudos:1

Copper doesn't corrode too badly (see statue of liberty). The biggest problem with water getting into the coax is that it changes the properties of the coax, detuning it and attenuating the signal. If your signal is marginal, this slight detuning can easily turn it into a bad signal.

If you're getting service already, then it's fine, but be ready to re-run the line if it fails.



Shaw50

@shawcable.net
reply to Shaw50

Sort of what I figured. Every time they come to replace the line on the ground they have to run a completely new line as it also carries line voltage they said (To the amp. in the pedestal I assume).

Huge fork lift going back and forth over it right now. No one seems to care its there, lol!



shaw50

@shawcable.net
reply to Shaw50

Cut and replaced again!

The guy who came out said they couldn't splice it because there is electricity running on the cable to power the amp. in the pedestal. What kind of current would that be?


kevinds
Premium
join:2003-05-01
Calgary, AB
kudos:3

Every cable has electricity.. I think 0.0 db is around 1 volt, for going into an address.

But the power to run a pedistal, depends on how many customers are being served by it I suppose.

I would suspect, there is a detection in process, to not send power down a down'd line, but I don't know for sure.

I am sure though, that eventually, after giving enough credits to customers for service offline, and having to pay people to come out and fix the cables, they'll get more active in pushing for a better solution for the cable laying on the ground.
--
Yes, I am not employed and looking for IT work. Have passport, will travel.



Shaw50

@shawcable.net
reply to Shaw50

Unfortunately we are the only customer fed on this run. It was a weird line run by CableVision/Monarch before Shaw bought them out. Never even mapped I guess. It was going to be right through the center of the new foundation being poured.

It is the city constructing a police station addition so... Any one else running wires like this and it would not be allowed


kevinds
Premium
join:2003-05-01
Calgary, AB
kudos:3

If you are the only one, then keep calling as soon as it goes down, and keep asking for credits for downtime.

After sending enough service calls out, someone will eventually come up with a better solution, or a better way to run the cable.
--
Yes, I am not employed and looking for IT work. Have passport, will travel.



nfx
The Wire
Premium
join:2001-05-21
Vancouver, BC
kudos:1
reply to kevinds

0 dB = 1 millivolt.
--
nfx


ravenchilde

join:2011-04-01
kudos:2

said by nfx:

0 dB = 1 millivolt.

Actually that rating would be dBmv


news

@videotron.ca
reply to shaw50

said by shaw50 :

Cut and replaced again!

The guy who came out said they couldn't splice it because there is electricity running on the cable to power the amp. in the pedestal. What kind of current would that be?

In a cable plant, distribution amplifiers are feeded by 60V or 90V AC (depending of plant desing). So all the cables feeding nodes or amplifiers have 60 or 90V AC and no more then 15A of AC current. On a cable line feeding only 1 amplifier, the current will only be 1 or 2A, but if you are on a cable line near the power supply, the current can be near 15A.

If a tenchnician create a short while working on a cable line with ac current, the fuse at the power supply can blow out and it will shut down the entire node, it's call a cable outage!!!

This AC current has nothing to do with the low power radiofrequencies signal mesured in dBmV.

kevinds
Premium
join:2003-05-01
Calgary, AB
kudos:3

Shouldn't that be happening each time this cable line gets cut/damaged though?
--
Yes, I am not employed and looking for IT work. Have passport, will travel.



news

@videotron.ca

said by kevinds:

Shouldn't that be happening each time this cable line gets cut/damaged though?

What? A short-Circuit? If a very fast short-circuit happens while a cable is cut, there's no problem, the short-circuit has to be maintain to blow-out a fuse.

kevinds
Premium
join:2003-05-01
Calgary, AB
kudos:3

I'm thinking breaker that auto-resets itself.

Have you ever cut through a live 120 volt line in your house? instantly trips the breaker, because it takes too long to go through the wrie, 90 volts AC isn't that much different from 120.
--
Yes, I am not employed and looking for IT work. Have passport, will travel.