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nointernet

@uwo.ca

[Grandfathered Plans] Bell cut my Internet

Hi

Bell cut my Internet service last night (it's the grandfathered unlimited plan, but we barely use that much, usually between 20-60 gigs). We called earlier today and they said they'd cut the Internet because we had cancelled the phone service.

We stopped the phone service with Bell months ago, and when we cancelled, they'd never said anything about the fact we need to have it in order to have Internet.

They said they'll restore it in a few days but this is really annoying because Internet is so vital in this day and age. We were thinking of switching ISP anyway, and this is just more reason.

Is there anything else we can do?
(Can we sue?)



HiVolt
Premium
join:2000-12-28
Toronto, ON
kudos:21

You don't need a phone service for DSL. What Bell failed to do is to convert your line to a dry-loop DSL.

Simple as that.


yyzlhr

join:2012-09-03
Scarborough, ON
kudos:2
reply to nointernet

Did you cancel your home phone all together or did you port your number to another provider? If you port your number, the new provider is supposed to inform Bell that you are retaining DSL service.

Expand your moderator at work


QuantumPimp

join:2012-02-19
Reviews:
·voip.ms
reply to yyzlhr

Re: [Grandfathered Plans] Bell cut my Internet

said by yyzlhr:

Did you cancel your home phone all together or did you port your number to another provider? If you port your number, the new provider is supposed to inform Bell that you are retaining DSL service.

Never heard that one before. How is the winning provider supposed to know what Bell services are associated with the phone number? It seems Bell should check their own records but inter-departmental politics sometimes prevents the transfer from happening smoothly.


nointernet

@uwo.ca
reply to yyzlhr

We went with a VOIP company for phone. (Which relies on the Internet. Double whammy)



Paolo
Mr. Wireless

join:2004-05-29
canada

ive heard of this problem before but aren't bell internet and bell telephone seperate services? can one subscribe to bell internet without a bell telephone service? and if so they do not need to pay a dry loop? or yes?
--
Happiness is like peeing your pants... Everyone can see it, but only you can feel its Warmth!!


Dunlop

join:2011-07-13
kudos:2
Reviews:
·Bell Fibe
·ELECTRONICBOX
reply to nointernet

Not sure where you are physically located but I recommend anyone to switch off of Bell and go with a iisp (i.e Teksavvy). You will be forced to pay a dry loop fee (unless you can use cable internet) but it is usually still cheaper and you will have a MUCH larger download limit


bt

join:2009-02-26
canada
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Start Communicat..
reply to Paolo

said by Paolo:

can one subscribe to bell internet without a bell telephone service? and if so they do not need to pay a dry loop?

Yes, and no.


jasmo34

join:2008-03-20
London, ON

1 edit
reply to nointernet

I think if you make ANY changes to a Bell grandfathered plan or account, you will lose that 'grandfathered' status.

Bell wants to eliminate unlimited grandfathers!

When/If they hook you back up via a dry loop (should be free), check your account status, and see what plan you are now on.

I would also recommend you at least consider some Indie ISP, like Start.ca or Teksavvy.com; both offer DSL and/or Cable internet services. EBox also offers DSL, in Ontario.

Look at startup costs, monthly costs, speeds, and monthly usage allowances. Some DSL plans have some free 'off-peak downloading', which might allow you to choose a lower usage plan. And check Bell's cncellation requirements, on your "possibly new plan".

uwo.ca... they didn't force this to be converted to "wu.ca"?


yyzlhr

join:2012-09-03
Scarborough, ON
kudos:2
reply to QuantumPimp

said by QuantumPimp:

said by yyzlhr:

Did you cancel your home phone all together or did you port your number to another provider? If you port your number, the new provider is supposed to inform Bell that you are retaining DSL service.

Never heard that one before. How is the winning provider supposed to know what Bell services are associated with the phone number? It seems Bell should check their own records but inter-departmental politics sometimes prevents the transfer from happening smoothly.

It doesn't, the system tells the sales rep to ASK the customer whether they have DSL and whether they wish to keep it.

decx
Premium
join:2002-06-07
Vancouver, BC
reply to nointernet

The grandfather plans are around $80 after tax now. Since there are various truly unlimited plans with higher bandwidth available from independents for less or equal money (even factoring in dry loop fees) why stick with the old Bell HSE/Ultra plans?



RMerlin

join:2009-10-09
Montreal, QC

said by decx:

The grandfather plans are around $80 after tax now. Since there are various truly unlimited plans with higher bandwidth available from independents for less or equal money (even factoring in dry loop fees) why stick with the old Bell HSE/Ultra plans?

Especially since you mention never using over 60 GB - even staying with Bell but switching to a different package could save you over 20$/month (and even more if you were switching provider).


Glen1
These Are The Good Ol' Days.
Premium,MVM
join:2002-05-24
GTA Canada
kudos:8
Reviews:
·Bell Fibe
reply to nointernet

If you have DSL whether it is with Bell or an independent provider like Teksavvy, the onus is on you to notify your provider that you are disconnecting your land line. If with Bell, your dry loop fee would be waived and with other providers you are charged a nominal fee but it is up to you to tell them. You are lucky it wasn't cut off right away when you shut down the telephone service. The port might have been outside and left in place until it was assigned to a new customer. The telephone line or dry loop number is used as an "identifier" to the dsl service and needs to be there. It isn't necessary to keep the internet up but it helps to prevent it from being removed in "error".
--
My Canada includes Quebec.
Disclaimer: If I express an opinion, it is my own opinion, not that of Bell or its related companies.



Paolo
Mr. Wireless

join:2004-05-29
canada

i did not know that


yyzlhr

join:2012-09-03
Scarborough, ON
kudos:2
reply to Glen1

said by Glen1:

If you have DSL whether it is with Bell or an independent provider like Teksavvy, the onus is on you to notify your provider that you are disconnecting your land line. If with Bell, your dry loop fee would be waived and with other providers you are charged a nominal fee but it is up to you to tell them. You are lucky it wasn't cut off right away when you shut down the telephone service. The port might have been outside and left in place until it was assigned to a new customer. The telephone line or dry loop number is used as an "identifier" to the dsl service and needs to be there. It isn't necessary to keep the internet up but it helps to prevent it from being removed in "error".

It works differently if the customer is porting which the customer did in this situation. The new provider is supposed to ASK whether they have DSL and whether they wish to retain the service. The new provider is supposed to relay this information to the existing provider. I've worked for many providers throughout my career and the systems are setup to ask the rep these questions and you cannot submit the port request without answering those questions.


QuantumPimp

join:2012-02-19
Reviews:
·voip.ms

What you're suggesting is consistent with my first hand experience but VoIP.ms, for example, says the following:

Requirements

Some important requirements you need to know before starting a port request:

Make sure to provide the exact information as it is on the losing carrier's Customer Service Record. This is usually your Service Address. Please note that the service address CAN be different from your billing address. Billing addresses will usually get rejected if it's not the same as your Service Address. If you are not sure of what is the correct service information, please contact your current service provider to obtain the Customer Service Record before proceeding.

During a regular porting process your number will be working with the losing provider, which means you need to also make sure your number is active and not scheduled for cancellation, until the port gets completed.

If you decide to port your number, you will have to make sure that your balance covers the porting fee. Otherwise, our staff will not start the process until the balance is in a positive standing after you have submitted the port order.

It is the customer's responsibility to contact the losing provider after the number has been completely ported to VoIP.ms in order to request to have the number or other services disconnected from them.
Unless I am missing a crucial step documented elsewhere on their site, nowhere do they collect information about other services to be retained by the losing provider. In fact, the bold text appears to assume the default is to retain other services.

yyzlhr

join:2012-09-03
Scarborough, ON
kudos:2

The portion in bold doesn't make any reference to DSL services. What it means is that the customer should contact their old provider to make sure their account is closed.

Perhaps smaller VOIP providers don't do this, I know from experience working for the big guys, the DSL question is always asked and you cannot skip it. Also, when I worked at Rogers, I ported many customers over to Rogers home phone but some wanted to keep Bell internet. All of these customers successfully retained their DSL service without every contacting Bell.



QuantumPimp

join:2012-02-19

It appears that Rogers has a much better process than VoIP.ms when porting from Bell.


decx
Premium
join:2002-06-07
Vancouver, BC

said by QuantumPimp:

It appears that Rogers has a much better process than VoIP.ms when porting from Bell.

Why is that? What a losing provider does after a port out is up to the losing provider. All the receiving provider does is submits the port request.

despe666

join:2009-06-20
Montreal, QC

said by decx:

Why is that? What a losing provider does after a port out is up to the losing provider. All the receiving provider does is submits the port request.

Quite easy to understand actually. There must be an about equal number of Bell->Rogers ports than Rogers->Bell ports. If Bell gives Rogers a hard time, Rogers can give a hard time to Bell in return. Voip.ms does not have that kind of leverage.


QuantumPimp

join:2012-02-19
Reviews:
·voip.ms

said by despe666:

said by decx:

Why is that? What a losing provider does after a port out is up to the losing provider. All the receiving provider does is submits the port request.

Quite easy to understand actually. There must be an about equal number of Bell->Rogers ports than Rogers->Bell ports. If Bell gives Rogers a hard time, Rogers can give a hard time to Bell in return. Voip.ms does not have that kind of leverage.

Agreed. A while back I worked on VoIP provisioning systems for Tier 1 - Tier 3 service providers world wide. The actual provisioning steps for LNP activations were exclusively a business-to-business agreement. The legal requirement did not specify how to make the process seamless, only the minimum required elements to make LNP functional.

Bell and Rogers, as mid-sized Tier 2 providers in the same market, have probably worked out some of the kinks between themselves.

I'm still confused why Bell doesn't handle the process more gracefully for their own suite of services.

decx
Premium
join:2002-06-07
Vancouver, BC
reply to nointernet

The point is regardless of who is the receiving provider, the what the loosing provider do after (whether it cancels the account or leave it active but orphaned) has nothing to do with the receiving provider. Bell isn't going to cancel an account because it's ported to Rogers but leave it active because it's ported to Voip.ms. If there is a difference in results it because an oversight happened somewhere. Normally most providers cancel an account upon port out.

Btw, most Voip providers like VoIP.ms don't submit ports to the loosing provider by themselves. They're submitted through the provider's their upstream ILECs like ISP Telecom (for Voip.ms in much of Ontario). So LNP transactions between Bell and the receiving provider would actually be quite substantial.