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Beezel

join:2008-12-15
Las Vegas, NV
reply to Doctor Olds

Re: Dealership mechanics abuse customers Camaro SS

Yea that is what happens when you have the traction control on with the brakes fully applied (overpowering clamping force). If he was serious about burning tires, then he would have the traction control off and just nail it. The pain about replacing it is the clutch is on the rear end.



Cho Baka
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said by Beezel:

Yea that is what happens when you have the traction control on with the brakes fully applied (overpowering clamping force).

That isn't how it works. Traction Control will not cause a clutch to fail.
--
The talented hawk speaks French.


DeltaElite
We Dont Dial 911

join:2002-03-29
Tucker, GA
kudos:1
reply to sailor

Excessive operator head spaces causes clutch's to burn like that....traction control only spends more of your money!

Or, as Bugs Bunny used to say: "What a maroon!"
--
Protect your right to keep and arm bears!



Blogger
Jedi Poster
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join:2012-10-18
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1 edit
reply to Cho Baka

A man's got to know his limitations. If you are a skilled driver and are going to "push" your car hard, especially if it is a high performance car you should all ways have the traction and stability control disengaged. On the other hand if you are just driving "normally" and especially on a winding road then traction and stability control is generally advisable to all ways be on.



Cho Baka
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said by Blogger:

A man's got to know his limitations.

Just as true a statement when dispensing advice.

said by Blogger:

If you are a skilled driver and are going to "push" your car hard, especially if it is a high performance car you should all ways have the traction and stability control disengaged. On the other hand if you are just driving "normally" and especially on a winding road then traction and stability control is generally advisable to all ways be on.

Oh, yes. I can see the logic there. Always. Sure.
While driving near the limit of grip it is a good idea to turn off stability and traction control. Just like on Top Gear.

99.99 % of drivers who think they are skilled drivers should always have the traction and stability control engaged.

I had a chance to go for a ride-along in a pace car at an Indy race (road circuit). This was a skilled driver pushing it. They left the traction and stability control on. It didn't get in their way.

Pushing it ought to be saved for a track anyhow.

A properly skilled driver will not exceed the limits, so the traction and stability control should not intrude. Right? Always?
--
The talented hawk speaks French.


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1 edit

Hmm, your post all most sound like a troll, but perhaps I'm being over sensitive or misreading your intent and good will to simply offer your opinion as opposed to "advice" just as I was simply attempting to offer my opinion.

Obviously your bar for what constitutes a skilled driver is much lower than mine. You know your limitations. That is good. Truly.

If you, like me are driving a high performance de-tuned quai-race car on a fast two lane highway well known to me in Mexico like I've done many times in the years past you turn of traction and stability control. You can drive faster that way and are more challenged too. Yes, that is why on Top Gear they turn if off when testing high performance car's maximum performance--because traction control and stability control DOES lower the optimal performance. In fact they often bitch about traction and stability control that you can't turn off on some high performance vehicles they test.

The only time it is a bad idea in my specific scenario and clearly narrowly defined variables is if you've got a car that is a high performance car but whose power train, weight distribution, and suspension are poorly or terribly matched and combined--like the Mercedes AMG C model. That car will kill you if you try to push it hard without stability and traction control no matter how good you are.

Say how about those traction control and stability controls on F1, NASCAR, open wheel Indy cars and other closed circuit road course cars such as those that race at Le Mans?

Wait! I heard a "rumor" that traction and stability controls are actually legally banned from Formula One, (F1) cars. Surely this can't be true!


Beezel

join:2008-12-15
Las Vegas, NV

1 recommendation

reply to Cho Baka

said by Cho Baka:

said by Beezel:

Yea that is what happens when you have the traction control on with the brakes fully applied (overpowering clamping force).

That isn't how it works. Traction Control will not cause a clutch to fail.

I also mentioned the brakes fully applied, which you can see they are (he is trying to power brake). If the car is immobilized by the brakes and the clutch can't over power their clamping force, then the clutch has only so much friction. Thus the clutch clamping force (friction) will be overpowered by the torque of the engine output. Then there goes the clutch being burnt up.


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said by Beezel:

said by Cho Baka:

said by Beezel:

Yea that is what happens when you have the traction control on with the brakes fully applied (overpowering clamping force).

That isn't how it works. Traction Control will not cause a clutch to fail.

I also mentioned the brakes fully applied, which you can see they are (he is trying to power brake). If the car is immobilized by the brakes and the clutch can't over power their clamping force, then the clutch has only so much friction. Thus the clutch clamping force (friction) will be overpowered by the torque of the engine output. Then there goes the clutch being burnt up.

+1


Cho Baka
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reply to Beezel

said by Beezel:

said by Cho Baka:

said by Beezel:

Yea that is what happens when you have the traction control on with the brakes fully applied (overpowering clamping force).

That isn't how it works. Traction Control will not cause a clutch to fail.

I also mentioned the brakes fully applied, which you can see they are (he is trying to power brake). If the car is immobilized by the brakes and the clutch can't over power their clamping force, then the clutch has only so much friction. Thus the clutch clamping force (friction) will be overpowered by the torque of the engine output. Then there goes the clutch being burnt up.

That still isn't how it works. Engine output will not cause a normally functioning clutch to slip, regardless of whether the brakes are applied.
--
The talented hawk speaks French.

Beezel

join:2008-12-15
Las Vegas, NV

1 edit

said by Cho Baka:

That still isn't how it works. Engine output will not cause a normally functioning clutch to slip, regardless of whether the brakes are applied.

You obviously don't know crap when it comes to mechanics and basic physics. I am not going to waste the time and argue, that it can cause a normal function clutch to fail by making it slip. Why do you think they have metallic, button, and multi-plate clutches? TO INCREASE CLAMPING FORCE SO THEY DON'T SLIP UNDER HIGH HP/TORQUE. Also you must not be old enough to know how we used to side step and power brake back in the day.

BTW.. Thank you for keeping us professionals in business by your cars to the shop because you don't know how to repair your own car.


Cho Baka
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said by Beezel:

BTW.. Thank you for keeping us professionals in business by your cars to the shop because you don't know how to repair your own car.

I fail to see any evidence of professionalism in your posts.
--
The talented hawk speaks French.