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Morac
Cat god

join:2001-08-30
Riverside, NJ
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Comcast
reply to Morac

Re: [Connectivity] Modem keeps losing upstream channel bonding

Comcast tech came out and he was seeing upstream power levels about 4 dB too high at the tap so he put it in to the line techs.

In the mean time he swapped legs on the 3-way splitter so that my modem has the 3.5db leg. That brought the upstream power levels down from about 51/52 to 47/48.

The downside is that the 3.5dB leg had been feeding a 4-way splitter near my TV (don't ask), so now the downstream signals at my TV are barely enough to get a picture.

When things get fixed, I'll probably swap the legs back.
--
The Comcast Disney Avatar has been retired.


andyross
Premium,MVM
join:2003-05-04
Schaumburg, IL

said by Morac:

The downside is that the 3.5dB leg had been feeding a 4-way splitter near my TV (don't ask), so now the downstream signals at my TV are barely enough to get a picture.

Being for TV, you could consider an amp for that leg. Just make certain it is 'digital' or 'broadband' compatible and will pass the upstream if you have any full cable boxes on that leg. Any TV's directly connected, or using DTA, don't send a return signal, and could be OK with a cheaper amp (but I still wouldn't waste money on one.) Use a quality amp like the Motorola series, and not some cheap Radio Shack or WalMart thing.


telcodad

join:2011-09-16
Lincroft, NJ
kudos:4

As for some ideas for an amp to use on the TV side, see: »[DVR] Which AMP to use



Morac
Cat god

join:2001-08-30
Riverside, NJ
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Comcast

1 edit
reply to andyross

said by andyross:

said by Morac:

The downside is that the 3.5dB leg had been feeding a 4-way splitter near my TV (don't ask), so now the downstream signals at my TV are barely enough to get a picture.

Being for TV, you could consider an amp for that leg. Just make certain it is 'digital' or 'broadband' compatible and will pass the upstream if you have any full cable boxes on that leg. Any TV's directly connected, or using DTA, don't send a return signal, and could be OK with a cheaper amp (but I still wouldn't waste money on one.) Use a quality amp like the Motorola series, and not some cheap Radio Shack or WalMart thing.

Wouldn't an amp just introduce noise into the signal? Part of the problem is that certain frequencies are pretty strong, despite the 4-way splitters, while some are borderline. I wouldn't want to overload my boxes on the "good" channels, simply to boost the "bad" ones.

I do have another option. I have a NetGear MoCA bridge currently hooked up off the 4 way splitter. The MoCA bridge has an amplified passthru which I could then feed into a 3 way splitter. That wouldn't help 2 of the devices, but the 3rd would get a slight boost.

The downside to that is that if the bridge loses power, the signal strength goes down the toilet. I have a few DVRs connected to a UPS so they can keep recording during a brief power outage. I'd have to connect the bridge to that as well.

In case anyone is curious I have 2 TiVos, a Comcast Cable box and the MoCA bridge off the 4-way splitter. Supposedly On-Demand is coming to the TiVo sometime in the future (it's already available in some areas). Once that happens I can get rid of the box and simply use a 2-way splitter.
--
The Comcast Disney Avatar has been retired.


telcodad

join:2011-09-16
Lincroft, NJ
kudos:4

said by Morac:

said by andyross:

said by Morac:

The downside is that the 3.5dB leg had been feeding a 4-way splitter near my TV (don't ask), so now the downstream signals at my TV are barely enough to get a picture.

Being for TV, you could consider an amp for that leg. Just make certain it is 'digital' or 'broadband' compatible and will pass the upstream if you have any full cable boxes on that leg. Any TV's directly connected, or using DTA, don't send a return signal, and could be OK with a cheaper amp (but I still wouldn't waste money on one.) Use a quality amp like the Motorola series, and not some cheap Radio Shack or WalMart thing.

Wouldn't an amp just introduce noise into the signal?

If you place the (good quality) amp before the losses (splitters and cabling) then any extra noise introduced should be minimal.

See the "Cable Modem Setup #1" case at the end of this webpage: »www.cabletvamps.com/education%20···Splitter