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cowboyro
Premium
join:2000-10-11
Shelton, CT

2 recommendations

reply to Mr Matt

Re: Using Dry Ice for Cooling backup for refrigerator?

Fill 4-5 1-gal jugs of water and put in freezer. When the scheduled day comes move the frozen jugs in the refrigerator. Maybe leave 1 in the freezer part.
I prepared 7-8 when Irene hit last year, they lasted for 2 days.
It won't matter if you open the refrigerator few times, the thermal capacity of the stuff inside is orders of magnitude higher than the thermal capacity of all air inside.



Ken
Premium,MVM
join:2003-06-16
Markle, IN

said by cowboyro:

Fill 4-5 1-gal jugs of water and put in freezer. When the scheduled day comes move the frozen jugs in the refrigerator. Maybe leave 1 in the freezer part.
I prepared 7-8 when Irene hit last year, they lasted for 2 days.
It won't matter if you open the refrigerator few times, the thermal capacity of the stuff inside is orders of magnitude higher than the thermal capacity of all air inside.

This is exactly what I was going to recommend. The key is to have your fridge packed as full as possible. The less air space you have the longer the items will stay cold.


alkizmo

join:2007-06-25
Pierrefonds, QC
kudos:1
reply to cowboyro

said by cowboyro:

Fill 4-5 1-gal jugs of water and put in freezer.

This
Dry ice is overkill and might actually freeze stuff around it (Don't want to freeze your eggs now do you?).

Also for the frozen jugs, try to find containers with as much SURFACE to volume ratio. It will increase the amount of cold is expels over time, so instead of "somewhat cold", it will keep the fridge properly cold.

As for packing the fridge, ya do that, but don't actually go buy anything to put in the fridge. What you can do is fill up tons of bottles with water. They'll absorb plenty of coldness which will be useful when the electricity is out.

For the freezer section, try to consume as much stuff inside before the power outage. Frozen foods cannot be "re-frozen" so gracefully. Everything will ice/frost on the surface (from the water being unfrozen on the surface during the power outage). Chicken wing bags will become one big clump of chicken wings. Ice cream will have a frozen slab at the top. You might end up having to defrost your freezer after the power outage anyway. (Actually maybe that's where you WOULD use dry ice).

averagedude

join:2002-01-30
San Diego, CA
Reviews:
·Cox HSI
reply to cowboyro

said by cowboyro:

Fill 4-5 1-gal jugs of water and put in freezer. When the scheduled day comes move the frozen jugs in the refrigerator. Maybe leave 1 in the freezer part.
I prepared 7-8 when Irene hit last year, they lasted for 2 days.
It won't matter if you open the refrigerator few times, the thermal capacity of the stuff inside is orders of magnitude higher than the thermal capacity of all air inside.

^^2nd^^