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yaplej
Premium
join:2001-02-10
White City, OR
reply to TuxRaiderPen

Re: Bad Linux Politics

Perhaps I am just ignorant but if the maintainers of Linux feel that the entirety of the Linux kernel should be open source then I can respect that they are determined to hold their ground on this issue.

So we have this dilemma. Kernel remains GLP and some drivers remain closed yet want the benefits of the GLP code. So in this case why are there individuals who insist that its the Kernel developers who should compromise on this issue?

Same holds true in real politics extremists demand one thing and expect everyone else to compromise to their demands. Its admirable that the Kernel team is not compromising.

Whats this mean? Pretty much nothing. You build the driver from ATI/Nvidia and taint your kernel. Big deal life goes on. People disagree and are entitled to without either of them having to compromise.

Anyone who says "party x should just do y" can just go f* off.
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said by yaplej:

the entirety of the Linux kernel should be open source

+1
said by yaplej:

You build the driver from ATI/Nvidia and taint your kernel. Big deal life goes on.

+1


Maxo
Your tax dollars at work.
Premium,VIP
join:2002-11-04
Tallahassee, FL

1 edit
Lets go over some facts.
1. The Linux kernel code is licensed under the GPLv2.
2. The GPLv2 prohibits proprietary derivatives.
3. Changing the Linux kernel code's license would require contacting every author of every line of code in the current Linux kernel and receiving permission from all of them, or those pieces would need to be rewritten.
So even if there was an atmosphere of general acceptance of proprietary derivatives in the Linux community it would be so hard to do legally as to render it impossible anyways.
People who wish to create derivatives of GPLed code either need to obey the term of the license, or accept that they find the license terms unacceptable. Proprietary software is much more restrictive, but you don't see people pitching a fit about obeying their licensing terms. Hell, in most cases creating derivatives of proprietary code is not allowed and illegal.
The viral nature of the GPL has had some big wins, including the massive amount of GPL code Microsoft wrote to get their Hypervisor to work properly on Linux. So there are some wins, and there are some losses.

Update: Fixed confusing wording.
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