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gordonwd

join:2002-02-06
Rochester, MI

Looking for Equipment/Cabling Overview

U-verse just became available at my address, so I'm in the learning phase. I'd be getting a TV/Internet/Phone bundle and am trying to get the entire picture of what pieces of equipment will be installed and the cabling options between them.

I've previously rejected cable providers' offers because I don't want an installer coming out and wrapping cable around the outside of my house, drilling holes in our (new) siding, etc. At least U-verse has a wireless receiver for our 2nd TV, but I'm still concerned about cabling that might be required.

We currently have one provider for Internet/phone, and that equipment is on the west end of the 2nd floor with a CAT5 run from the cable modem to my wired/wireless router, also on the 2nd floor. At the east end of the 1st floor (IOW, as far away as you can get in our house) is our main TV and DVR, which are on DISH satellite with a short cable run from the receiver to the dish.

There is standard phone wiring throughout the house, but it's not clear to me how this relates to U-verse.

So is there any single diagram or document that explains all the connection options, including TV, Internet, and phone? Thanks for any info!


Nuckfuts
Premium
join:2003-10-18
Joliet, IL
They tech will need to run a "homerun" from the NID on the outside of your house. They can use coax or cat3 or cat5. I had coax but am now on cat5. If you have existing lines they can possibly reuse them. The standard phone wiring will be used for the voip. They will run a cat3 from your RG to a phone jack and it will make all your phone jacks work for your phones. If he uses cat3 or cat5 for the homerun the tech will use a single pair from the NID and tie-in all other phone lines inside the house to the voip line. U-Verse can also use HPNA over coax. They use coax from the RG to splitter which will connect any TV's or if your homerun is coax they will use a diplexer inside then split off that to a coax splitter. Or if they can run cat5 from the RG to a switch and tie in your receivers that way with cat5 runs to the receivers. I have had TV's when I had U-Verse hooked up with cat5 and coax and their was no difference. I guess it comes down to where you want the RG. Don't let him decide where he wants it. Put it where it works best for your equipment. Also, the tech will determine when he is there the distance from your home to the VRAD which will determine your available profile (32/5, 25/2, 19/2) which will determine how many HD feeds you can get and what internet speed packages you will qualify for. Sorry, do not have a diagram for you but someone here will post one sooner or later. Hope it works out for you.

gordonwd

join:2002-02-06
Rochester, MI
Thanks! This helps a lot and I was even able to figure out most of the acronyms. I assume that the NID and RG are separate devices?

How is the connection into the house done? We of course have an existing 4-wire copper line coming in (currently disconnected since we're using a cable phone service), but I assume that they wouldn't just re-connect it since that would feed into the whole house phone wiring spaghetti.

Another question: Does the RG also serve as my Internet router and wireless access point? I have a bunch of wireless devices and currently have my own Linksys router connected to the cable modem. Would I keep this or use the RG's wireless?


Msradell
P.E.
Premium
join:2008-12-25
Louisville, KY
said by gordonwd:

Another question: Does the RG also serve as my Internet router and wireless access point? I have a bunch of wireless devices and currently have my own Linksys router connected to the cable modem. Would I keep this or use the RG's wireless?

The RG serves as the router/access point. You can however still use your existing Linksys one without a problem. Just set it up downstream of the RG.

gordonwd

join:2002-02-06
Rochester, MI
said by Msradell:

The RG serves as the router/access point. You can however still use your existing Linksys one without a problem. Just set it up downstream of the RG.

Really? You can have two levels of routing, i.e., a router connected to a port on another router?


Mangix

join:2012-02-16
united state
yes. but some things do fail if they're wrong. second router must be of a different subnet(eg. 192.168.2.x).

personally i would just bridge the router to the 2wire so that it just provides 802.11n(2wire is b/g only). I mean unless features like traffic monitoring, UPnP, IPv6, etc... are needed, having a router behind a router is pretty useless.


Nuckfuts
Premium
join:2003-10-18
Joliet, IL
reply to gordonwd
Have him run a new homerun to the RG location. The NID is just a box on the outside of your house that the drop (service line) connects to and then the homerun goes from the NID to your RG in the house.