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Glen1
These Are The Good Ol' Days.
Premium,MVM
join:2002-05-24
GTA Canada
kudos:8
Reviews:
·Bell Fibe
reply to nointernet

Re: [Grandfathered Plans] Bell cut my Internet

If you have DSL whether it is with Bell or an independent provider like Teksavvy, the onus is on you to notify your provider that you are disconnecting your land line. If with Bell, your dry loop fee would be waived and with other providers you are charged a nominal fee but it is up to you to tell them. You are lucky it wasn't cut off right away when you shut down the telephone service. The port might have been outside and left in place until it was assigned to a new customer. The telephone line or dry loop number is used as an "identifier" to the dsl service and needs to be there. It isn't necessary to keep the internet up but it helps to prevent it from being removed in "error".
--
My Canada includes Quebec.
Disclaimer: If I express an opinion, it is my own opinion, not that of Bell or its related companies.


Paolo
Mr. Wireless

join:2004-05-29
canada
i did not know that

yyzlhr

join:2012-09-03
Scarborough, ON
kudos:4
reply to Glen1
said by Glen1:

If you have DSL whether it is with Bell or an independent provider like Teksavvy, the onus is on you to notify your provider that you are disconnecting your land line. If with Bell, your dry loop fee would be waived and with other providers you are charged a nominal fee but it is up to you to tell them. You are lucky it wasn't cut off right away when you shut down the telephone service. The port might have been outside and left in place until it was assigned to a new customer. The telephone line or dry loop number is used as an "identifier" to the dsl service and needs to be there. It isn't necessary to keep the internet up but it helps to prevent it from being removed in "error".

It works differently if the customer is porting which the customer did in this situation. The new provider is supposed to ASK whether they have DSL and whether they wish to retain the service. The new provider is supposed to relay this information to the existing provider. I've worked for many providers throughout my career and the systems are setup to ask the rep these questions and you cannot submit the port request without answering those questions.


QuantumPimp

join:2012-02-19
Reviews:
·voip.ms
What you're suggesting is consistent with my first hand experience but VoIP.ms, for example, says the following:

Requirements
Some important requirements you need to know before starting a port request:

Make sure to provide the exact information as it is on the losing carrier's Customer Service Record. This is usually your Service Address. Please note that the service address CAN be different from your billing address. Billing addresses will usually get rejected if it's not the same as your Service Address. If you are not sure of what is the correct service information, please contact your current service provider to obtain the Customer Service Record before proceeding.

During a regular porting process your number will be working with the losing provider, which means you need to also make sure your number is active and not scheduled for cancellation, until the port gets completed.

If you decide to port your number, you will have to make sure that your balance covers the porting fee. Otherwise, our staff will not start the process until the balance is in a positive standing after you have submitted the port order.

It is the customer's responsibility to contact the losing provider after the number has been completely ported to VoIP.ms in order to request to have the number or other services disconnected from them.
Unless I am missing a crucial step documented elsewhere on their site, nowhere do they collect information about other services to be retained by the losing provider. In fact, the bold text appears to assume the default is to retain other services.

yyzlhr

join:2012-09-03
Scarborough, ON
kudos:4
The portion in bold doesn't make any reference to DSL services. What it means is that the customer should contact their old provider to make sure their account is closed.

Perhaps smaller VOIP providers don't do this, I know from experience working for the big guys, the DSL question is always asked and you cannot skip it. Also, when I worked at Rogers, I ported many customers over to Rogers home phone but some wanted to keep Bell internet. All of these customers successfully retained their DSL service without every contacting Bell.


QuantumPimp

join:2012-02-19
It appears that Rogers has a much better process than VoIP.ms when porting from Bell.

decx
Premium
join:2002-06-07
Vancouver, BC
said by QuantumPimp:

It appears that Rogers has a much better process than VoIP.ms when porting from Bell.

Why is that? What a losing provider does after a port out is up to the losing provider. All the receiving provider does is submits the port request.

despe666

join:2009-06-20
Montreal, QC
said by decx:

Why is that? What a losing provider does after a port out is up to the losing provider. All the receiving provider does is submits the port request.

Quite easy to understand actually. There must be an about equal number of Bell->Rogers ports than Rogers->Bell ports. If Bell gives Rogers a hard time, Rogers can give a hard time to Bell in return. Voip.ms does not have that kind of leverage.


QuantumPimp

join:2012-02-19
Reviews:
·voip.ms
said by despe666:

said by decx:

Why is that? What a losing provider does after a port out is up to the losing provider. All the receiving provider does is submits the port request.

Quite easy to understand actually. There must be an about equal number of Bell->Rogers ports than Rogers->Bell ports. If Bell gives Rogers a hard time, Rogers can give a hard time to Bell in return. Voip.ms does not have that kind of leverage.

Agreed. A while back I worked on VoIP provisioning systems for Tier 1 - Tier 3 service providers world wide. The actual provisioning steps for LNP activations were exclusively a business-to-business agreement. The legal requirement did not specify how to make the process seamless, only the minimum required elements to make LNP functional.

Bell and Rogers, as mid-sized Tier 2 providers in the same market, have probably worked out some of the kinks between themselves.

I'm still confused why Bell doesn't handle the process more gracefully for their own suite of services.