dslreports logo
site
 
    All Forums Hot Topics Gallery
spc

spacer




how-to block ads


Search Topic:
uniqs
5657
share rss forum feed

GTFan

join:2004-12-03
reply to telcodad

Re: [Price] Rate Hike and new Additional Outlet Fee

LOL, he bought a $1000 Panny 42" plasma. That should tell you everything you need to know right there, which is that he way overspent to 'cut the cord'.

And he didn't address a major issue for many, which is how to replace live sports and news. Sports in particular can get expensive a la carte if you have to subscribe to multiple feeds, and even then some of it is not available on the net (like NASCAR).


mikedz4

join:2003-04-14
Weirton, WV
It's available on SIRIUS if you JUST want to Listen to it. Plus I think you can subscribe to nascar package but that is expensive.


oj829Jr

@verizon.net
reply to GTFan
quote:
And he didn't address a major issue for many, which is how to replace live sports and news.

Sounds like sports wasn't a big deal in his house, which is the kind of house where cord-cutting might start to make some sense, as one is no longer burdened subsidizing "pro" sports.

But it ALSO sounds like he had no millenials in the house, which means that few of his gadgetry gotchas and hardware heartaches could have been addressed ahead of time. Had he rented an available nephew or niece for an afternoon, things could have gone a little bit better.

But overall, "cord cutting" has always meant getting rid of a reliable (if mediocre) appliance in favor of a high-maintenance regimen of subscriptions and configurations and connections and payments, etc. It's always been a no-brainer for tech-savvy millenial multitaskers but not necessarily worth the hassle for someone like this article's author.

So, yet another "Stupid old guy cuts cord" story. Great. Doesn't address the long-term problem cable still has of making anyone under 30 think TV is worth paying for.

TurboDan

join:2006-06-08
Lavallette, NJ

2 edits
reply to telcodad
said by telcodad:

As this article shows, the cost of "cutting the cord" may not always be as (initially) cheap as it might seem:

The Cost of Cutting Cable
By Steven Rosenbaum, Forbes - November 12, 2012
»www.forbes.com/sites/stevenrosen···g-cable/

From the article:

Today, more than a year later – we’ve recovered. We’ve re-invented how we discover, consume, and share media. But, a word of warning. It wasn’t easy – and it wasn’t cheap. Yes, we pocketed the bulk of our Time Warner bill (we dropped from $130 to just $33 for broadband). But did the $97 a month go to VOD or other subscriptions? Sort of. And what about hardware? Ugh, ok hold on for some sticker shock there.

Who was that written by? A cable industry lobbyist?

That was one of the dumbest articles I've ever read. He counts the cost of a new TV against the money saved from dropping cable? (Guess he didn't know they sell HDMI to component converters for $35.) Then he buys Apple TV, Google TV as well as TiVO and counts THAT against the cost of dropping cable? The real world consumer would buy ONE service.

At the end of the day, cable rates are exploding out of control and there is more backlash than ever to the overall ripoff of this industry. If that pushes people in the direction of being creative, I'm all for it, but articles like that are designed to "prove" dropping cable costs more money will not help the consumer decide. I honestly wonder if this writer was in the tank for the industry.

If a reliable a-la-carte option, delivered over IP, arose, I would most certainly take advantage of it, and I think this is the eventual solution. It's absurd to pay hundreds of dollars to watch maybe 20 channels. How much do I pay for 50 sports channels I never watch? Women's channels? Movie channels? Aside from the networks, I watch NatGeo, Discovery, TBS, USA, Universal HD, and a few other channels on a random basis. If some company ever comes up with a "choose 10 channels" package or "choose 20 channels package" for some flat rate, I think they'd have a hit.

I know plenty of people in the 20s set who just don't bother with paying for cable, and download the shows they like minutes after they air, either through something like Hulu Plus or simply a torrent file. Paying outrageous sums of money for hundreds of television stations is something people will laugh hysterically at eventually, like renting your phone from the phone company.

"Hey, remember back in the day when we had to pay for all those channels whether we watched them or not?"


telcodad
Premium
join:2011-09-16
Lincroft, NJ
kudos:15
Another "cut the cord" article (but without all those upfront costs):

My Life as a Television Throwback
By Taffy Brodesser-Akner, The NY Times - November 23, 2012
»www.nytimes.com/2012/11/25/arts/···edy.html


telcodad
Premium
join:2011-09-16
Lincroft, NJ
kudos:15
But as I just posted in another thread (»Re: Say goodbye to ClearQAM ), a new caveat on "going OTA":

Rovi Phasing Out Over-the-Air Guide Listings
Vendor Cites End of Data Broadcast Agreements; Service to Fully Cease by April 2013

By Todd Spangler, Multichannel News - November 27 2012
»www.multichannel.com/technology/···s/140422

From the article:
Rovi has started shutting off the TV listings data it has provided in over-the-air broadcasts to dozens of consumer-electronics device models in North America -- and will completely end the service by April 2013 -- a move that has infuriated consumers who claim it will render their DVRs useless.

The company said its agreements with data broadcasting partners CBS and National Datacast Inc. (NDI), a for-profit subsidiary of PBS, are coming to an end.
:
All Rovi guides in analog TVs, digital TVs and consumer-electronics DVRs that receive over-the-air broadcast data via an antenna or a cable TV connection in the U.S. and Canada, including the Rovi Guide Plus+ and TV Guide on Screen products, will be affected by the change.


mikedz4

join:2003-04-14
Weirton, WV
reply to nokken
latest bill ONLY SAYS:
Performance from $62.95 to $64.95
Blast! from 72.95 to 74.95
that is standalone.
Nothing about packages.


insomniac
Oh Yeah
Premium
join:2002-09-22
Naperville, IL
Reviews:
·Comcast
Mine shows increases in Internet prices for TV customers as well, in smaller print underneath the standalone price.
--
If everything seems to be going well, you've obviously overlooked something.


mikedz4

join:2003-04-14
Weirton, WV
Ours was only a small paragraph no big notice.


telcodad
Premium
join:2011-09-16
Lincroft, NJ
kudos:15
reply to telcodad
An article in yesterday's Wall Street Journal on some reasons to cut the cord:

Ten Things Cable-TV Companies Won't Say
By Jonnelle Marte, The Wall Street Journal - December 2, 2012
MarketWatch's Jonnelle Marte looks at the things cable companies won't tell you, such as why rising prices are part of their heritage and good service exists but not in your area.
»online.wsj.com/article/SB1000142···news_wsj

logger

join:2012-06-14
Carmel, NY
said by telcodad:

An article in yesterday's Wall Street Journal on some reasons to cut the cord:

Ten Things Cable-TV Companies Won't Say
By Jonnelle Marte, The Wall Street Journal - December 2, 2012
MarketWatch's Jonnelle Marte looks at the things cable companies won't tell you, such as why rising prices are part of their heritage and good service exists but not in your area.
»online.wsj.com/article/SB1000142···news_wsj

Thanks for the link. My experience is consistent with many of the reasons.

1. "Customers are fed up with us." I became fed up enough with the lack of effective customer service from the current owner of the local cable TV system that I stopped being a cable TV customer.

2. "Good service exists...just not in your area." I was a customer of the same local cable TV system under previous owners for about 20 years. The previous owners, unlike the current owner, actually provided what they said they would provide.

3. "We aren't a monopoly, but we may be your only option." That is a distinction without a difference. If there were another cable TV operator where I live, I would be a cable TV customer.

8. "Use the word 'cancel,' and you've got our attention." That was not true for me. When I canceled, they handled the request very effectively. If they had been effective at fixing problems I reported, I would have continued to have been a customer.


telcodad
Premium
join:2011-09-16
Lincroft, NJ
kudos:15
reply to owlyn
FYI - If Comcast wins this case, subscribers in Oregon may see a refund of some of the local taxes they have paid:

Oregon court cases could have big budget impact
By Jonathan Cooper, AP, in the San Francisco Chronicle - December 5, 2012
»www.sfgate.com/news/article/Oreg···4509.php
A third tax-court case has significant implications for local-government budgets. The Oregon Supreme Court will hear oral arguments next month in a case brought by Comcast Corporation, which is challenging the Department of Revenue's decision to label Comcast a communications company rather than a cable-television provider. The vagaries of a 1970s-era law mean Comcast would pay higher taxes as a communications company than as a cable provider.

The tax court ruled in Comcast's favor. If the Supreme Court upholds the ruling, local governments will owe substantial refunds to Comcast and other Internet companies.

Gov. John Kitzhaber's office is trying to broker a compromise that would update the laws for the Internet age.


Morac
Cat god

join:2001-08-30
Riverside, NJ
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Comcast
reply to nokken
Everything went up on my bill (Internet, TV, etc). Not only that, but they removed 2 of my 4 customer owned device credits.

I'm currently in a 12 month deal, but I decided to return my DTA and HD cable box (since TiVo Premiere now has On Demand).

It will be interesting to see what they do with my bill since I was told I was getting the HD cable box for free (well I'm paying a HD tech fee), but I wasn't using it so I returned it.
--
The Comcast Disney Avatar has been retired.

Zoder

join:2002-04-16
Miami, FL

1 edit
reply to telcodad
nm

dbw09
Premium
join:2001-01-18
Alexandria, VA
reply to Morac
This story is eerily similar to mine. I just got my Jan2013 bill and not only are all of my discounts/credits gone, but I am being charged the same mysterious "additional outlet fee" as well. I called and spoke to an incredibly helpful CSR was told me that the additional fee was an error and the removal of my discounts (customer owned modem as well as bundle discount) was also an error. She was able to fix the outlet fee, but could not re-institute my discounts, since apparently the billing folks can easily remove them (which someone had done to me!) but they did not have the power to put the discounts back, only the higher-ups or retention folks could. She stayed on the line with me while someone else put the bundle discount and modem credits back on. My advice is to call in and get your bills fixed, since this appears to be an across the board mess-up and not an individual one!

GTFan

join:2004-12-03
Something strange is going on (with my account at least) - I had 3 Cablecards and returned one this month because they started charging $10 outlet for each of the 2 extras. They took $10 off for one the day I returned it, as expected, but then a week later took the other $10 off for my one extra card without any action on my part. I have no STBs with them, just a DTA and two cards. Now I'm getting 2 x $2.50 credits for both cards and no outlet fees on my Jan. statement.

Knowing them, it's just another billing mistake and the system will add the outlet back for the extra card. They are so screwed up with this stuff it's not even funny.


halfband
Premium
join:2002-06-01
Huntsville, AL

1 edit
You are correct, comcast is having issues with cable cards and their billing system. Charging you the full $10 per extra outlet for a cablecard would run afoul of the FCC regulations, assuming that $10 is the charge for an additional standard cable box on an account in your area. They are required to set the cable card fee at less than a value that includes discounting for the amortized cost of the cable box over a period set by the FCC. Obviously from the "user equipment credit" comcast has set that value at about $2.50 in most areas.
In areas that do not have analog channels, Comcast can charge $10 for an additional cable card "extra outlet", but must then subtract the $2.50 user equipment discount. It appears that many local billing systems are unable to handle this change correctly and you have seen the result as a combination of the charges appearing and disappearing.
Comcast also has issues with the definition of "extra outlet" as this is poorly defined in comcasts available documentation. There are Tivo's, silicon dust primes, and other devices that accept two cable cards. Their system can not handle two cable cards on a single extra outlet, causing mass confusion and frustration for both the CSR and customer. To avoid endless CSR confrontations from irritated customers (and most Cable Card users are technologically savy) Comcast would need a clear and concise definition of what qualifies as an extra outlet. Past history hardly indicates that will happen.
--
Registered Bandwidth Offender #40812